In my father's house : Africa in the philosophy of culture (Book, 1992) [WorldCat.org]
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In my father's house : Africa in the philosophy of culture

Author: Anthony Appiah; Allen R Grossman
Publisher: New York : Oxford University Press, 1992.
Edition/Format:   Print book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
"Africa's intellectuals have long been engaged in a conversation among themselves and with Europeans and Americans about what it means to be African. At the heart of these debates on African identity are the seminal works of politicians, creative writers, and philosophers from Africa and its diaspora. In this book, Appiah asks how we should think about the cultural situation of these intellectuals, reading their  Read more...
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Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Appiah, Anthony.
In my father's house.
New York : Oxford University Press, 1992
(OCoLC)810356667
Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Anthony Appiah; Allen R Grossman
ISBN: 0195068513 9780195068511 0195068521 9780195068528
OCLC Number: 24375250
Awards: Anisfield-Wolf Book Award, 1993.
Description: xi, 225 pages ; 25 cm
Contents: The invention of Africa --
Illusions of race --
Topologies of nativism --
The myth of an African world --
Ethnophilosophy and its critics --
Old gods, new worlds --
The postcolonial and the postmodern --
Altered states --
African identities.
Responsibility: Kwame Anthony Appiah.
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Abstract:

"Africa's intellectuals have long been engaged in a conversation among themselves and with Europeans and Americans about what it means to be African. At the heart of these debates on African identity are the seminal works of politicians, creative writers, and philosophers from Africa and its diaspora. In this book, Appiah asks how we should think about the cultural situation of these intellectuals, reading their works in the context both of European and American ideas and of Africa's own indigenous traditions." "Appiah draws on his experiences as a Ghanaian in the New World to explore the writings of African and African-American thinkers. In the process, he contributes his own vision of the possibilities and pitfalls of an African identity in the late twentieth century." "Setting out to dismantle the specious oppositions between "us" and "them," the West and the Rest, that have governed so much of the cultural debate about Africa in the modern world, Appiah maintains that all of us, wherever we live on the planet, must explore together the relations between our local cultures and an increasingly global civilization. Appiah combines philosophical analysis with more personal reflections, addressing the major issues in the philosophy of culture through an exploration of the contemporary African predicament."--Jacket.

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A wonderfully crafted collection of essays. * In My Father's House * Appiah's book on the place of Africa in contemporary philosophy powerfully exposes the dangers of any simplistic notion of African Read more...

 
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