The indigenous diaspora in academics and the impact of the Red Power Movement on inclusion of American Indian scholarship (Book, 2000) [WorldCat.org]
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The indigenous diaspora in academics and the impact of the Red Power Movement on inclusion of American Indian scholarship

Author: Sara C Sutler-Cohen
Publisher: 2000.
Dissertation: M.A. Humboldt State University 2000
Edition/Format:   Thesis/dissertation : Thesis/dissertation : Manuscript   Archival Material : English
Summary:
This thesis investigates the degree to which American Indians are left out of the academic discourse around race analysis. Further, it investigates the way in which, since the 1960s' Red Power Movement, the gates of the Ivory Tower have opened for Indigenous scholars. Henceforth, scholarship from Native people continues to flourish, as does the Native student body. This work contributes to our general understanding  Read more...
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Details

Genre/Form: Academic theses
Material Type: Thesis/dissertation, Manuscript, Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Archival Material, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Sara C Sutler-Cohen
OCLC Number: 45652894
Description: vi, 71 leaves ; 29 cm
Responsibility: by Sara C. Sutler-Cohen.

Abstract:

This thesis investigates the degree to which American Indians are left out of the academic discourse around race analysis. Further, it investigates the way in which, since the 1960s' Red Power Movement, the gates of the Ivory Tower have opened for Indigenous scholars. Henceforth, scholarship from Native people continues to flourish, as does the Native student body. This work contributes to our general understanding of race and ethnic relations by utilizing theoretical tools with which we are already equipped. I draw from theories of race and ethnic studies, social construction, and social history. I also bring in work by Indian scholars from American Studies, philosophy, psychology, history, and the work of White scholars on the issues of American Indians. It is my goal to promote the study of Indigenous issues within the realm of sociology, and to do this with all of the intellectual integrity possible.

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