The Individualist Anarchists : Anthology of Liberty, 1881-1908 (eBook, 2017) [WorldCat.org]
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The Individualist Anarchists : Anthology of Liberty, 1881-1908

Author: Frank H Brooks
Publisher: Milton : Taylor and Francis, 2017.
Edition/Format:   eBook : Document : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
"Among the political ideologies generally considered to be of continuing significance, anarchism alone has never been implemented. Perhaps its rigors are too strong and its advocates are too weak. That it is still considered worth studying is testimony to its intellectual credibility, particularly its single-minded emphasis on individual liberty. Obsession with liberty and skepticism of government are as alive today  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Electronic books
History
Additional Physical Format: Print version:
Brooks, Frank H.
Individualist Anarchists : Anthology of Liberty, 1881-1908.
Milton : Taylor and Francis, ©2017
Material Type: Document, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: Frank H Brooks
ISBN: 9781351480918 135148091X 9781315132662 1315132664
OCLC Number: 999651535
Notes: B. The Economic Freedom of Women (Florence Finch Kelly, 1885).
Description: 1 online resource (343 pages)
Contents: Cover; Half Title; Title; Copyright; Dedication; Contents; Preface; Introduction: Putting Liberty in Context; Part I: The Political Theory of Individualist Anarchism; 1. General Theories of Individualist Anarchism; A. Anarchism and Consent (Benjamin Tucker, 1882); B. The Beliefs of Anarchists (""An English Anarchist, "" 1885); C. The Relation of the State to the Individual (Benjamin Tucker, 1890); D.A Business Government (John Beverley Robinson, 1894); E. ""Anarchy or Government"" (Victor Yarros vs. William Salter, 1896); 2. Critique of the Liberal Legacy. A. The Root of Despotism (Benjamin Tucker, 1881)B. The Sin of Herbert Spencer (Benjamin Tucker, 1884); C. Mr. Spencer and Socialism (Gertrude B. Kelly, 1885); D. Justice and Anarchism (Victor Yarros, 1891); E. The Reasons Why (Victor Yarros, 1887); F. Morality and Its Origin (John F. Kelly, 1887); G. The Fiction of Natural Rights (Dyer D. Lum, 1890); H. Rights and Contract (Benjamin Tucker vs. J. William Lloyd, 1895); J. The Liberty of Egoism (E. Horn, 1894); 3. Libertarian Socialism; A. State Socialism and Anarchism: How Far They Agree, And Wherein They Differ (Benjamin Tucker, 1888). B. Anarchism, True and False (Henry Appleton, 1884)C. The Two Socialisms (A.H. Simpson, 1889); D. Unscientific Socialism: Anarchist Communism (Victor Yarros, 1890); E. Karl Marx as Friend and Foe (Benjamin Tucker, 1883); F. Unscientific Socialism: Marxian Socialism (Victor Yarros, 1890); G. ""The Soul of Man Under Socialism"" (M. Saint-Georges de Bouhelier, 1907; Part II: Economics; 4. Economic Principles of Individualist Anarchism; A. ""Who Is the Somebody?"" (Benjamin Tucker, 1881); B. The True Function of Competition (William Bailie, 1893). C. Problems of Anarchism: Property (William Bailie, 1893)D. Cooperation a Panacea? (Ernest Lesigne, 1888); E. Voluntary Cooperation (Francis D. Tandy, 1896); F. The Attitude of Anarchism toward Industrial Combinations (Benjamin Tucker, 1902); 5. Interest, The Money Monopoly, and Mutual Banking; A. Interest (John Beverley Robinson, 1897); 6. Rent and the Land Monopoly; A. Land Reform in 1848 and 1888 (Joshua K. Ingalls, 1888); B. Economic Rent (Stephen T. Byington vs. Benjamin Tucker, 1892); C. Property under Anarchism (Albert Tarn vs. Auberon Herbert vs. Benjamin Tucker, 1892). D. Pertinent Questions (Bolton Hall and Benjamin Tucker, 1895)7. Tariffs, Patent, and Copyright; A. Will Professor Sumner Choose? (Benjamin Tucker, 1885); B. Ergo and Presto! (Benjamin Tucker [and Henry George], 1888); C. Property in Ideas and Equal Liberty (Victor Yarros, 1891); D. The Reward of Authors (Hugo Bilgram vs. Benjamin Tucker, 1891); E. The Attitude of Anarchism toward Industrial Combinations (Benjamin Tucker, 1902); Part III: Social Controversies; 8. Free Love and Women's Freedom; A. The Root of Prostitution (Gertrude B. Kelly, 1885).
Responsibility: Frank H. Brooks, editor.

Abstract:

"Among the political ideologies generally considered to be of continuing significance, anarchism alone has never been implemented. Perhaps its rigors are too strong and its advocates are too weak. That it is still considered worth studying is testimony to its intellectual credibility, particularly its single-minded emphasis on individual liberty. Obsession with liberty and skepticism of government are as alive today as they were in the nineteenth century. This book offers a comprehensive introduction to anarchism in the United States, revealing its historical roots and relevance to today's problems. The relationship between anarchy and individualism in the nineteenth century is well known. How this affected the larger system is what the bulk of the anthology is about. Liberty was a magazine featuring some of the outstanding anarchist thinkers in America at the turn of the century. This anthology offers a selection of writings spanning the magazine's twenty-seven year life and features some of its major writers: Benjamin Tucker, Victor Yarros, Steven Byington, John Beverley Robinson, and Gertrude Kelly. The chapters are divided into four sections: political theory, economic theories and reforms, social implications, and strategies of individualist anarchism. The authors criticize censorship, state support of patriarchal marriage, and the general invasion of privacy. Though quite radical, the writers were not revolutionaries in a conventional sense; they emphasized passive resistance, rather than violent assault, as proper. The Individualist Anarchists is not merely of historical Interest, but offers a fundamental critique of government and authority - one that remains a relevant part of today's libertarian movement. It will be of Interest to political theorists, economists, sociologists, and scholars of American history; above all, to those who may not yet have appreciated the worth of an analysis made so many years ago."--Provided by publisher

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