Introduction to genetic analysis (Book, 2015) [WorldCat.org]
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Introduction to genetic analysis
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Introduction to genetic analysis

Author: Anthony J F Griffiths; Susan R Wessler; Sean B Carroll; John F Doebley
Publisher: New York, NY : W.H. Freeman & Company, [2015] ©2015
Edition/Format:   Print book : English : Eleventh editionView all editions and formats
Summary:
"With each edition, An Introduction to Genetic Analysis (IGA) evolves discovery by discovery with the world of genetic research, taking students from the foundations of Mendelian genetics to the latest findings and applications by focusing on the landmark experiments that define the field. With its author team of prominent scientists who are also highly accomplished educators, IGA again combines exceptional  Read more...
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Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Anthony J F Griffiths; Susan R Wessler; Sean B Carroll; John F Doebley
ISBN: 9781464109485 1464109486 9781464188046 1464188041
OCLC Number: 900650999
Notes: Preceded by Introduction to genetic analysis / Anthony J.F. Griffiths [and others]. 10th ed. c2012.
Description: xxiii, 868 pages : illustrations (chiefly color), portraits, color map ; 29 cm
Contents: Preface --
1. The Genetics Revolution --
1.1 The birth of genetics --
1.2 After cracking the code --
1.3 Genetics today --
Part I: Transmission Genetics. 2. Single-Gene Inheritance --
2.1 Single-gene inheritance patterns --
2.2 The chromosomal basis of single-gene inheritance patterns --
2.3 The molecular basis of mendelian inheritance patterns --
2.4 Some genes discovered by observing segregation ratios --
2.5 Sex-linked single-gene inheritance patterns --
2.6 Human pedigree analysis --
3. Independent Assortment of Genes --
3.1 Mendel's Law of Independent Assortment --
3.2 Working with independent assortment --
3.3 The chromosomal basis of independent assortment --
3.4 Polygenic inheritance --
3.5 Organelle genes: inheritance independent of the nucleus --
4. Mapping Eukaryote Chromosomes by Recombination --
4.1 Diagnostics of linkage --
4.2 Mapping by recombinant frequency --
4.3 Mapping with molecular markers --
4.4 Centromere mapping with linear tetrads --
4.5 Using the Chi-Square test to infer linkage --
4.6 Accounting for unseen multiple crossovers --
4.7 Using recombination-based maps in conjunction with physical maps --
4.8 The molecular mechanism of crossing over --
5. The Genetics of Bacteria and Their Viruses --
5.1 Working with microorganisms --
5.2 Bacterial conjugation --
5.3 Bacterial transformation --
5.4 Bacteriophage genetics --
5.5 Transduction --
5.6 Physical maps and linkage maps compared --
6. Gene Interaction --
6.1 Interactions between the alleles of a single gene: variations of dominance --
6.2 Interaction of genes in pathways --
6.3 Inferring gene interactions --
6.4 Penetrance and expressivity. Part II: From DNA to Phenotype. 7. DNA: Structure and Replication --
7.1 DNA: the genetic material --
7.2 DNA structure --
7.3 Semiconservative replication --
7.4 Overview of DNA replication --
7.5 The replisome: a remarkable replication machine --
7.6 Replication in eukaryotic organisms --
7.7 Telomeres and telomerase: replication termination --
8. RNA: Transcription and Processing --
8.1 RNA --
8.2 Transcription --
8.3 Transcription in eukaryotes --
8.4 Intron removal and exon splicing --
8.5 Small functional RNAs that regulate and protect the eukaryotic genome --
9. Proteins and Their Synthesis --
9.1 Protein structure --
9.2 The genetic code --
9.3 tRNA: the adapter --
9.4 Ribosomes --
9.5 The proteome --
10. Gene Isolation and Manipulation --
10.1 Overview: isolating and amplifying specific DNA fragments --
10.2 Generating recombinant DNA molecules --
10.3 Using molecular probes to find and analyze a specific clone of interest --
10.4 Determining the base sequence of a DNA segment --
10.5 Aligning genetic and physical maps to isolate specific genes --
10.6 Genetic engineering --
11. Regulation of Gene Expression in Bacteria and Their Viruses --
11.1 Gene regulation --
11.2 Discovery of the lac system: negative control --
11.3 Catabolite repression of the lac operon: positive control --
11.4 Dual positive and negative control: the arabinose operon --
11.5 Metabolic pathways and additional levels of regulation: attenuation --
11.6 Bacteriophage life cycles: more regulators, complex operons --
11.7 Alternative sigma factors regulate large sets of genes --
12. Regulation of Gene Expression in Eukaryotes --
12.1 Transcriptional regulation in eukaryotes: an overview --
12.2 Lessons from yeast: the GAL system --
12.3 Dynamic chromatin --
12.4 Activation of genes in a chromatin environment --
12.5 Long-term inactivation of genes in a chromatin environment --
12.6 Gender-specific silencing of genes and whole chromosomes --
12.7 Post-transcriptional gene repression by miRNAs --
13. The Genetic Control of Development --
13.1 The genetic approach to development --
13.2 The genetic toolkit for Drosophila development --
13.3 Defining the entire toolkit --
13.4 Spatial regulation of gene expression in development --
13.5 Post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression in development --
13.6 From files to fingers, feathers and floor plates: the many roles of individual toolkit genes --
13.7 Development and disease --
14. Genomes and Genomics --
14.1 The genomics revolution --
14.2 Obtaining the sequence of a genome --
14.3 Bioinformatics: meaning from genomic sequence --
14.4 The structure of the human genome --
14.5 The comparative genomics of humans with other species --
14.6 Comparative genomics and human medicine --
14.7 Functional genomics and reverse genetics. Part III: Mutation, variation, and evolution. 15. The Dynamic Genome: Transposable Elements --
15.1 Discovery of transposable elements in Maize --
15.2 Transposable elements in prokaryotes --
15.3 Transposable elements in eukaryotes --
15.4 The dynamic genome: more transposable elements than ever imagined --
15.5 Regulation of transposable element movement by the host --
16. Mutation, Repair, and Recombination --
16.1 The phenotypic consequences of DNA mutations --
16.2 The molecular basis of spontaneous mutations --
16.3 The molecular basis of induced mutations --
16.4 Biological repair mechanisms --
16.5 Cancer: an important phenotypic consequence of mutation --
17. Large-Scale Chromosomal Changes --
17.1 Changes in chromosome number --
17.2 Changes in chromosome structure --
17.3 Overall incidence of human chromosome mutations --
18. Population Genetics --
18.1 Detecting genetic variation --
18.2 The gene-pool concept and the Hardy-Weinberg Law --
18.3 Mating systems --
18.4 Genetic variation and its measurement --
18.5 The modulation of genetic variation --
18.6 Biological and social applications --
19. The Inheritance of Complex Traits --
19.1 Measuring quantitative variation --
19.2 A simple genetic model for quantitative traits --
19.3 Broad-sense heritability: nature versus nurture --
19.4 Narrow-sense heritability: predicting phenotypes --
19.5 Mapping QTL in populations with known pedigrees --
19.6 Association mapping in random-mating populations --
20. Evolution of Genes and Traits --
20.1 Evolution by natural selection --
20.2 Natural selection in action: an exemplary case --
20.3 Molecular evolution: the neutral theory --
20.4 Cumulative selection and multistep paths to functional change --
20.5 Morphological evolution --
20.6 The origin of new genes and protein functions --
A brief guide to model organisms --
Appendix A: genetic nomenclature --
Appendix B: bioinformatics resources for genetics and genomics --
Glossary --
Answers to selected problems --
Index.
Other Titles: Genetic analysis
Responsibility: Anthony J.F. Griffiths, University of British Columbia ; Susan R. Wessler, University of California, Riverside ; Sean B. Carroll, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, University of Wisconsin--Madison ; John Doebley, University of Wisconsin--Madison.

Abstract:

"With each edition, An Introduction to Genetic Analysis (IGA) evolves discovery by discovery with the world of genetic research, taking students from the foundations of Mendelian genetics to the latest findings and applications by focusing on the landmark experiments that define the field. With its author team of prominent scientists who are also highly accomplished educators, IGA again combines exceptional currency, expansive updating of its acclaimed problem sets, and a variety of new ways to learn genetics. Foremost is this edition's dedicated version of W.H. Freeman's breakthrough online course space, LaunchPad, which offers a number of new and enhanced interactive tools that advance IGA's core mission: to show students how to analyze experimental data and draw their own conclusions based on scientific thinking while teaching students how to think like geneticists, "--Publisher's website.

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