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An inverview with Martin Hellman, 22 November, 2004.

Author: Martin Hellman; Jeffrey R Yost
Edition/Format:   Manuscript   Archival Material : English
Summary:
Leading cryptography scholar Martin Hellman begins by discussing his developing interest in cryptography, factors underlying his decision to do academic research in this area, and the circumstances and fundamental insights of his invention of public key cryptography with collaborators Whitfield Diffie and Ralph Merkle at Stanford University in the mid-1970s. He also relates his subsequent work in cryptography with  Read more...
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Details

Genre/Form: Oral histories
Named Person: Martin Hellman; Whitfield Diffie; Ralph C Merkle; Whitfield Diffie; Martin Hellman; Ralph C Merkle
Material Type: Manuscript, Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Archival Material, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Martin Hellman; Jeffrey R Yost
OCLC Number: 63319308
Notes: Recorded in Palo Alto, California.
Description: Transcript : 57 leaves
Other Titles: Oral history interview with Martin Hellman,
Martin Hellman interview,

Abstract:

Leading cryptography scholar Martin Hellman begins by discussing his developing interest in cryptography, factors underlying his decision to do academic research in this area, and the circumstances and fundamental insights of his invention of public key cryptography with collaborators Whitfield Diffie and Ralph Merkle at Stanford University in the mid-1970s. He also relates his subsequent work in cryptography with Steve Pohlig (the Pohlig-Hellman system) and others. Hellman addresses his involvement with and the broader context of the debate about the federal government's cryptography policy--regarding to the National Security Agency's (NSA) early efforts to contain and discourage academic work in the field, the Department of Commerce's encryption export restrictions (under the International Traffic of Arms Regulation, or ITAR), and key escrow (the so-called Clipper chip). He also touches on the commercialization of cryptography with RSA Data Security and VeriSign, as well as indicates some important individuals in academe and industry who have not received proper credit for their accomplishments in the field of cryptography.

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