Irish literature : the eighteenth century (Book, 2006) [WorldCat.org]
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Irish literature : the eighteenth century
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Irish literature : the eighteenth century

Author: A Norman Jeffares; Peter Van de Kamp
Publisher: Dublin, Ireland ; Portland, OR : Irish Academic Press, 2006.
Edition/Format:   Print book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
"Irish Literature: The Eighteenth Century illustrates not only the impressive achievement of the great writers - Swift, Berkeley, Burke, Goldsmith and Sheridan - but also shows the varied accomplishment of others, providing unexpected, entertaining examples from the pens of the less well known. Here are examples of the witty comic dramas so successfully written by Susannah Centlivre, Congreve, Steele, Farquhar and  Read more...
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Genre/Form: English literature
Literary collections
Literature
Criticism, interpretation, etc
Anthologie
Anthologies
Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Irish literature.
Dublin : Irish Academic Press, 2006
(OCoLC)647619826
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: A Norman Jeffares; Peter Van de Kamp
ISBN: 0716527995 9780716527992 0716528045 9780716528043
OCLC Number: 61302337
Description: xx, 402 p. ; 24 cm.
Contents: Appreciation of A.N. Jeffares --
Foreword by Brendan Kennelly --
Introduction --
Nahum Tate (1652-1715) --
Susannah Centlivre (?1667-1723) --
Jonathan Swift (1667-1745) --
John Toland (1670-1722) --
William Congreve (1670-1779) --
Sir Richard Steele (1672-1729) --
George Farquhar (?1677-1707) --
John Winstanley (?1678-1750) --
Thomas Parnell (1679-1718) --
George Berkeley (1685-1753) --
Patrick Delany (1685-1768) --
Thomas Sheridan (1687-1738) --
Mary Barber (1690-1757) --
Thomas Amory (?1691-1788) --
Charles Macklin (?1697-1797) --
George Faulkner (?1699-1775) --
Laurence Whyte (?1700-1755) --
Lord Orrery (1701-1762) --
Matthew Pilkington (?1701-1774) --
Henry Brooke (?1703-1783) --
Constantia Grierson (1703/1705-1732) --
Anne Berkeley (1706-1786) --
William Dunkin (?1709-1765) --
Laetitia Pilkington (?1707/1712-1750) --
Laurence Sterne (1713-1768) --
James Eyre Weekes (?1719-1754) --
Thomas Sheridan (1719-1788) --
Frances Sheridan (1724-1760) --
Anonymous --
Edmund Burke (1729-1797) --
Oliver Goldsmith (?1730-1774) --
Charlotte Brooke (?1740-1793) --
George Ogle (?1740/42-1814) --
Richard Lovell Edgeworth (1744-1817) --
Maria Edgeworth (1767-1849) and Richard Lovell Edgeworth (1744-1817) --
Henry Grattan (1746-1820) --
John O'Keeffe (1747-1833) --
John Philpot Curran (1750-1817) --
Richard Brinsley Sheridan (1751-1816) --
William Drennan (1754-1820) --
Patrick O'Kelly (1754-1835?) --
The Abbé Edgeworth (1745-1807) --
Theobald Wolfe Tone (1763-1798) --
Edward Bunting (1773-1845) --
Thomas Dermody (1775-1802) --
Maria Edgeworth (1767-1849) --
Dorothea Herbert (1768/1770-1829).
Responsibility: editors, A. Norman Jeffares and Peter van de Kamp.

Abstract:

"Irish Literature: The Eighteenth Century illustrates not only the impressive achievement of the great writers - Swift, Berkeley, Burke, Goldsmith and Sheridan - but also shows the varied accomplishment of others, providing unexpected, entertaining examples from the pens of the less well known. Here are examples of the witty comic dramas so successfully written by Susannah Centlivre, Congreve, Steele, Farquhar and Macklin. There are serious and humorous essayists represented, including Steele, Lord Orrery, Thomas Sheridan and Richard Lovell Edgeworth. Beginning with Gulliver's Travels, fiction includes John Amory's strange imaginings, Sterne's stream of consciousness, Frances Sheridan's insights, Henry Brooke's sentimentalities and Goldsmith's charm. Poetry ranges from the classical to the innovative. Graceful lyrics, anonymous jeux d'esprit, descriptive pieces, savage satires and personal poems are written by very different poets, among them learned witty women, clergymen and drunken ne'er-do-wells. Politicians, notably Grattan and Curran, produced eloquent speeches; effective essays and pamphlets accompanied political activity. Personal letters and diaries - such as the exuberant Dorothea Herbert's Recollections - convey the changing ethos of this century's literature, based on the classics and moving to an increasing interest in the translation of Irish literature."--Jacket.

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