The Jewish contribution to modern architecture, 1830-1930 (Book, 2004) [WorldCat.org]
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The Jewish contribution to modern architecture, 1830-1930

Author: Fredric Bedoire; Robert Tanner
Publisher: Stockholm ; Jersey City, NJ : KTAV Pub. House, 2004.
Edition/Format:   Print book : English : 2nd edView all editions and formats
Summary:
"A book about architecture and society, a wide-ranging cultural and historical depiction of successful Jewish entrepreneurs in an increasingly industrialized Europe, from the dissolution of the ghetto and the 1848 liberation movement to Hitler's assumption of power in Germany. Inspired by Jewish messianism, they pursued a modern culture, free from the old feudal society." "The principal characters are bankers,  Read more...
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Details

Genre/Form: History
Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Fredric Bedoire; Robert Tanner
ISBN: 0881258083 9780881258080
OCLC Number: 1057994291
Notes: Originally published in Swedish Ett judiskt Europa 1998, 2nd ed. 2003.
Description: 518 pages : illustrations, maps ; 25 cm
Contents: The Jewish European as patron of architecture --
The ghetto background --
The House of Rothschild --
Paris : capital of the nineteenth century --
Berlin and things Jewish --
Vienna --
Budapest --
Judapest --
The promised city : Nagyvarad, Lodz, New York --
Goteborg, city of liberalism --
The origins of a modern architecture.
Other Titles: Judiskt Europa.
Responsibility: Fredric Bedoire ; translated from the Swedish with grants from the Swedish Council of Science by Roger Tanner.
More information:

Abstract:

"A book about architecture and society, a wide-ranging cultural and historical depiction of successful Jewish entrepreneurs in an increasingly industrialized Europe, from the dissolution of the ghetto and the 1848 liberation movement to Hitler's assumption of power in Germany. Inspired by Jewish messianism, they pursued a modern culture, free from the old feudal society." "The principal characters are bankers, merchants, and industrialists together with their architects, from Schinkel and Semper to Mies van der Rohe and Le Corbusier. They built in Paris, Berlin, and Vienna, Budapest and New York and Chicago, and in more remote centers of Jewish entrepreneurial activity, such as Oradea (Nagyvarad) in present-day Romania and Lodz in Poland, Stockholm and Gothenburg in Sweden. The buildings shed new light on the Europe of today, but also on a Europe that is lost beyond recall." "Much of the modern European urban landscape was inspired by the initiative of these industrialists and philanthropists. Coincidental to the main thesis, this volume is also a history of Jews in the period."--Jacket.

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