John Keats and the loss of Romantic innocence (Book, 1996) [WorldCat.org]
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John Keats and the loss of Romantic innocence
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John Keats and the loss of Romantic innocence

Author: Keith D White
Publisher: Amsterdam ; Atlanta, GA : Rodopi, 1996. ©1996
Series: Costerus, new ser., v. 107.
Edition/Format:   Print book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
"John Keats and the Loss of Romantic Innocence traces Keats's use of an 'Apollonian metaphor.' Of the nearly 150 works listed in Jack Stillinger's standard edition, approximately half contain references to the god of nature and of art. What emerges are three distinct phases in Keats's aesthetic development. From his initial fondness for bower imagery and the pastoral voices of Spenser and Hunt, to the Neo-Platonism  Read more...
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Details

Genre/Form: Criticism, interpretation, etc
Named Person: John Keats; John Keats; Apollo, (Deity); John Keats; John Keats; Apollo, (Deity); John Keats; John Keats
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Keith D White
ISBN: 9042000589 9789042000582
OCLC Number: 35639359
Description: xv, 194 pages, 2 unnumbered leaves of plates : illustrations ; 23 cm.
Series Title: Costerus, new ser., v. 107.
Responsibility: Keith D. White.

Abstract:

"John Keats and the Loss of Romantic Innocence traces Keats's use of an 'Apollonian metaphor.' Of the nearly 150 works listed in Jack Stillinger's standard edition, approximately half contain references to the god of nature and of art. What emerges are three distinct phases in Keats's aesthetic development. From his initial fondness for bower imagery and the pastoral voices of Spenser and Hunt, to the Neo-Platonism of his poems about art and imagination, to his ultimate rejection of romantic idealism, Keats and his Apollonian metaphor are rarely separated. The poet's dismissal of romantic idealism is ultimately a rejection of Blake's God, Coleridge's Germanism, Wordsworth's Nature, Byron's Hellenism, and Shelley's Supernaturalism. The young poet dies aware of the excesses of his empirically oriented 'pleasant smotherings' and idealistic 'realms of gold.' He accepts a world without Apollo and his entourage, a world unembellished by art and other 'gilded cheats.'"--

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"...an interesting and worthwhile contribution to the study of Keats' poetry and aesthetics." in: The European Legacy, Vol. 10, 2005

 
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