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The knotted thong : structures of mimesis in Persius

Author: Daniel M Hooley
Publisher: Ann Arbor : University of Michigan Press, ©1997.
Edition/Format:   Print book : State or province government publication : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
D.M. Hooley has now reexamined Persius in light of developments in contemporary critical thinking, particularly that which builds upon classical imitation theories.
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Genre/Form: Criticism, interpretation, etc
Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Hooley, Daniel M.
Knotted thong.
Ann Arbor : University of Michigan Press, ©1997
(OCoLC)605554597
Named Person: Persius; Persius.; Persius.; Aulus Persius Flaccus; Persius; Persius; Aulus Persius Flaccus; Aulus Persius Flaccus
Material Type: Government publication, State or province government publication, Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Daniel M Hooley
ISBN: 0472107925 9780472107926
OCLC Number: 37239115
Description: xi, 286 pages ; 24 cm
Contents: Ch. 1. The Ars Poetica of Persius: Satire 1 --
Ch. 2. "A Lecture in Love's Philosophy": Satire 5 --
Ch. 3. Persius' Refractory Muse: Satires 4 and 6 --
Ch. 4. Of Prayer: Satire 2 --
Ch. 5. Ironies of Perspective: Satire 3 --
Ch. 6. Conclusions --
App. The Tradition of Imitatio.
Responsibility: D.M. Hooley.
More information:

Abstract:

D.M. Hooley has now reexamined Persius in light of developments in contemporary critical thinking, particularly that which builds upon classical imitation theories.

Addressing each of the six Satires as well as the introductory "Choliambics," Hooley contends that one of the most conspicuous features of Persius' verse, its allusiveness, is a key to this desiderated view. The long-recognized, exceptionally high frequency of imitations of and allusions to the works of Horace and others can be seen not as a mark of artistic immaturity but as a technique intended to engage other voices in the expression of a poem's meaning. Seen as an aspect of structural and thematic strategy, the pattern of Persius' engagement with the words of other poets reveals a remarkable and hitherto unregarded coherence in the Satires.

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