Land meiner Mörder, Land meiner Sprache : die Schriftstellerin Grete Weil (Book, 1998) [WorldCat.org]
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Land meiner Mörder, Land meiner Sprache : die Schriftstellerin Grete Weil

Author: Lisbeth Exner
Publisher: München : A1-Verlag, ©1998.
Series: MonAkzente, 6.
Edition/Format:   Print book : Biography : German : 1. AuflView all editions and formats
Summary:
Grete Weil (b. 1906) and her husband Edgar, assimilated German Jews from an artistic-literary milieu, fled the Nazi regime to the Netherlands. In June 1941 Edgar was deported with 200 other Jews to Mauthausen, where he died. Grete worked for the Resistance, and simultaneously, in spite of moral scruples, for the Jewish Council when it carried out the Nazis' orders to organize the mass deportations of 1943. As a  Read more...
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Details

Genre/Form: Biographie
Biographies
Criticism, interpretation, etc
Biografieën (vorm)
Biography
Named Person: Grete Weil; Grete Weil; Grete Weil; Grete Weil; Grete Weil
Material Type: Biography, Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Lisbeth Exner
ISBN: 3927743348 9783927743342
OCLC Number: 38987432
Description: 127 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm.
Series Title: MonAkzente, 6.
Other Titles: Schriftstellerin Grete Weil
Responsibility: Lisbeth Exner.

Abstract:

Grete Weil (b. 1906) and her husband Edgar, assimilated German Jews from an artistic-literary milieu, fled the Nazi regime to the Netherlands. In June 1941 Edgar was deported with 200 other Jews to Mauthausen, where he died. Grete worked for the Resistance, and simultaneously, in spite of moral scruples, for the Jewish Council when it carried out the Nazis' orders to organize the mass deportations of 1943. As a typist in the Amsterdam "Joodsche Schouwburg", a theater used as a roundup point, she was able to help some Jews escape. She and her mother survived in hiding. In 1946 she returned to Germany to marry a long-time German friend. In her autobiographical fiction, she tries to bear witness to the Holocaust and to her ambivalence about having survived when so many others perished. Eventually she realized that she could neither know nor write about the ultimate abyss - Mauthausen, "Auschwitz" - but that this is perhaps what enabled her to continue to live rather than commit suicide like so many survivors.

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