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Landmine Monitor Report 2001

Author: Human Rights Watch 350 Fifth Avenue 34th Floor New York NY 10118-3299; Handicap International (Belgium) rue de Spastraat 67 B-1000 Brussels; Kenya Coalition Against Landmines PO Box 57217 Nairobi; Mines Action Canada 1 Nicolas Street Suite 1210 Ottawa Ont K1N 7B7; Norwegian People's Aid PO Box 8844 Youngstorget NO-0028 Oslo
Publisher: United States 2001
Edition/Format: Book Book : English
Summary:
The Mine Ban Treaty is considered the only viable comprehensive framework for achieving a mine-free world. It is evident that the treaty, and the ban movement more generally, are making a significant difference. A growing number of governments are joining the Mine Ban Treaty and there is decreased use of antipersonnel mines, a dramatic drop in production, an almost complete halt to trade, rapid destruction of  Read more...
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Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Human Rights Watch 350 Fifth Avenue 34th Floor New York NY 10118-3299; Handicap International (Belgium) rue de Spastraat 67 B-1000 Brussels; Kenya Coalition Against Landmines PO Box 57217 Nairobi; Mines Action Canada 1 Nicolas Street Suite 1210 Ottawa Ont K1N 7B7; Norwegian People's Aid PO Box 8844 Youngstorget NO-0028 Oslo
ISBN: 1-56432-262-9
Language Note: English
Unique Identifier: 4769489433
Notes: ANNOTATION: This book discusses the effects of the Mine Ban Treaty.
Sale: Human Rights Watch, 350 Fifth Avenue, 34th Floor, New York, NY 10118-3299
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Description: 1180 p

Abstract:

The Mine Ban Treaty is considered the only viable comprehensive framework for achieving a mine-free world. It is evident that the treaty, and the ban movement more generally, are making a significant difference. A growing number of governments are joining the Mine Ban Treaty and there is decreased use of antipersonnel mines, a dramatic drop in production, an almost complete halt to trade, rapid destruction of stockpiled mines, fewer mine victims in key affected countries, and more land de-mined. Despite the progress, the reality is that antipersonnel mines continue to be laid and to take far too many victims. A total of 140 countries have signed or acceded to the Mine Ban Treaty as of July 31, 2001, thereby legally committing themselves to no use of antipersonnel mines. A total of 117 of those countries have ratified or acceded, thereby fully committing to all the provisions of the treaty. Considering the relatively short time that this issue has been before the international community, the number of signatories and accessions is exceptional. This is a clear indication of the widespread international rejection of any use or possession of antipersonnel mines. Virtually all of the non-signatories have endorsed the notion of a comprehensive ban on antipersonnel mines at some point in time, and many have already at least partially embraced the Mine Ban Treaty. Nevertheless, there has been little or no change in the ban policies of some states in the past year, including the United States, Russia, and China. Universalization clearly remains the biggest challenge facing ban supporters. Increasing attention has been paid in 2000 and 2001 to the use of media, tools, and materials in mine awareness. Appendices

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