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The last pagans of Rome

Author: Alan Cameron
Publisher: New York, N.Y. : Oxford University Press, 2011.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Rufinus' vivid account of the battle between the Eastern Emperor Theodosius and the Western usurper Eugenius by the River Frigidus in 394 represents it as the final confrontation between paganism and Christianity. It is indeed widely believed that a largely pagan aristocracy remained a powerful and active force well into the fifth century, sponsoring pagan literary circles, patronage of the classics, and propaganda  Read more...
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Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Alan Cameron
ISBN: 9780199747276 019974727X
OCLC Number: 553365192
Description: x, 878 p. : ill. ; 26 cm.
Contents: Pagans and polytheists --
From Constantius to Theodosius --
The Frigidus --
Priests and initiates --
Pagan converts --
Pagan writers --
Macrobius and the "pagan" culture of his age --
The poem against the pagans --
Other Christian verse invectives --
The real circle of Symmachus --
The "pagan" literary revival --
Correctors and critics I --
Correctors and critics II --
The Livian revival --
Greek texts and Latin translation --
Pagan scholarship : Vergil and his commentators --
The Annales of Nicomachus Flavianus I --
The Annales of Nicomachus Flavianus II --
Classical revivals and "pagan" art --
The Historia Augusta --
Appendix, The Poem against the pagans.
Responsibility: Alan Cameron.
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Abstract:

In a detailed analysis of the visual and textual evidence, this book disputes the widely held view that the late fourth century saw a vigorous and determined "pagan reaction" to the take-over of  Read more...

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Cameron dissects and deconstructs more than 100 years of scholarship about the transition from what we call late Roman imperial pagan culture to what is known as the triumph of Christianity. As Read more...

 
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schema:description"Rufinus' vivid account of the battle between the Eastern Emperor Theodosius and the Western usurper Eugenius by the River Frigidus in 394 represents it as the final confrontation between paganism and Christianity. It is indeed widely believed that a largely pagan aristocracy remained a powerful and active force well into the fifth century, sponsoring pagan literary circles, patronage of the classics, and propaganda for the old cults in art and literature. The main focus of much modern scholarship on the end of paganism in the West has been on its supposed stubborn resistance to Christianity. The dismantling of this romantic myth is one of the main goals of Alan Cameron's book. Actually, the book argues, Western paganism petered out much earlier and more rapidly than hitherto assumed. The subject of this book is not the conversion of the last pagans but rather the duration, nature, and consequences of their survival. By re-examining the abundant textual evidence, both Christian (Ambrose, Augustine, Jerome, Paulinus, Prudentius) and "pagan" (Claudian, Macrobius, and Ammianus Marcellinus), as well as the visual evidence (ivory diptychs, illuminated manuscripts, silverware), Cameron shows that most of the activities and artifacts previously identified as hallmarks of a pagan revival were in fact just as important to the life of cultivated Christians. Far from being a subversive activity designed to rally pagans, the acceptance of classical literature, learning, and art by most elite Christiansmay actually have helped the last reluctant pagans to finally abandon the old cults and adopt Christianity. The culmination of decades of research, The Last Pagans of Rome will overturn many long-held assumptions about pagan and Christian culture in the late antique West."
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