skip to content
Linking sociopolitical transformations to environmental change : a mixed-methods approach to assessing adaptive watershed governance in the Republic of Palau Preview this item
ClosePreview this item
Checking...

Linking sociopolitical transformations to environmental change : a mixed-methods approach to assessing adaptive watershed governance in the Republic of Palau

Author: Staci Ann LewisMargaret R CaldwellRobert DunbarNicole M ArdoinStephen Gene MonismithAll authors
Publisher: [Stanford, California] : [Stanford University], 2019. ©2019
Dissertation: Ph.D. Stanford University 2019. Thesis
Edition/Format:   Thesis/dissertation : Document : Thesis/dissertation : eBook   Computer File : English
Summary:
As Pacific societies' rule-making institutions moved toward representative governments, some societies hybridized their customary systems within contemporary governance structures. Hybridized arrangements—structures that integrate customary institutions within constitutional systems—can sustain or lead to adaptive natural resource management strategies. Achieving effective adaptive resource management in a  Read more...
Rating:

(not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first.

Find a copy online

Links to this item

Find a copy in the library

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Finding libraries that hold this item...

Details

Material Type: Document, Thesis/dissertation, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: Staci Ann Lewis; Margaret R Caldwell; Robert Dunbar; Nicole M Ardoin; Stephen Gene Monismith; Robert Richmond; Stanford University. Department of Environment and Resources.
OCLC Number: 1090119786
Notes: Submitted to the Department of Environment and Resources.
Description: 1 online resource
Responsibility: Staci Lewis.

Abstract:

As Pacific societies' rule-making institutions moved toward representative governments, some societies hybridized their customary systems within contemporary governance structures. Hybridized arrangements—structures that integrate customary institutions within constitutional systems—can sustain or lead to adaptive natural resource management strategies. Achieving effective adaptive resource management in a hybridized governance system, however, requires a perspective-based response to the complex socioeconomic and political drivers influencing environmental outcomes. Sociopolitical transformations, for example, may bolster economic development and land-use activities, potentially leading to detrimental ecological effects on watershed resources, such as poor water quality and reduced coral abundance. Examining major drivers of sociopolitical change in a local context can help shed light on resource governance outcomes and barriers to effective adaptive management. In 1994, after 100 years of foreign occupations, the Republic of Palau transitioned from customary rule to an American-style federalist entity. Under this new regime, Palau's small, inhabited land mass (459 km2) was divided into 16 states, each with different institutional arrangements and degrees of authority granted to customary leaders. These transformations ushered in a time of rapid socioeconomic change and intensified land-use activity. Using a mixed methods approach, this dissertation explores the effects of these sociopolitical transformations and the response of Palau's social system to environmental change. First, a historical analysis of state governance structures, their implementation, and watershed management actions was conducted for 10 states. Next, the magnitude of environmental changes from 1985 to 2015, specifically sediment delivery patterns, was assessed by reconstructing coral geochemical signatures of two trace metals, barium and manganese, in two watershed systems. Finally, a policy network analysis of the Belau Watershed Alliance (BWA), a bridging organization created in 2006 to address degrading watershed conditions, was used to examine the causal relationships between network structures and watershed governance actions. Findings show state governance arrangements vary along a gradient of hybridization from constitutional-dominant (level 1) to customary-dominant (level 5). State governments at either end of the gradient—levels 1 and 5—are more conflict-prone and have experienced impediments to watershed management. Coral geochemical findings link the construction of a major ring road that encircles the island (the "Compact Road") and years of heavy rainfall to increased sediment delivery in coral habitats. Different patterns in trace metal ratios between the two watershed systems studied suggest localized land use events as drivers of increased sediment delivery. All coral core samples showed statistically significant increases in trace metals between 2002 and 2007, when public outcry over increased sediment delivery catalyzed creation of the watershed alliance (BWA). The network facilitated by the BWA demonstrates causal relationships between network structures and governance processes. While policy formulation and transformative learning occurred in times of high network density, for example, density was lowest at times when planning and implementation processes were underway. Over the past century, Palau's society has undergone sociopolitical transformations leaving permanent imprints on the nation's institutions, values, and social norms. This research reveals environmental outcomes from these transformations and demonstrates the continued legacy of customary leaders as influencers in resource governance. Upholding cultural institutions may safeguard Palauan society's ability to adapt and respond to future environmental change. The findings from this dissertation may be applicable for other societies facing similar transformations alongside waning customary traditions.

Reviews

User-contributed reviews
Retrieving GoodReads reviews...
Retrieving DOGObooks reviews...

Tags

Be the first.
Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Linked Data


Primary Entity

<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/1090119786> # Linking sociopolitical transformations to environmental change : a mixed-methods approach to assessing adaptive watershed governance in the Republic of Palau
    a bgn:Thesis, schema:CreativeWork, schema:MediaObject, pto:Web_document, schema:Book ;
    bgn:inSupportOf "" ;
    library:oclcnum "1090119786" ;
    library:placeOfPublication <http://id.loc.gov/vocabulary/countries/cau> ;
    schema:author <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/8979593896#Person/lewis_staci_ann> ; # Staci Ann Lewis
    schema:contributor <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/8979593896#Person/richmond_robert> ; # Robert Richmond
    schema:contributor <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/8979593896#Organization/stanford_university_department_of_environment_and_resources> ; # Stanford University. Department of Environment and Resources.
    schema:contributor <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/8979593896#Person/monismith_stephen_gene> ; # Stephen Gene Monismith
    schema:contributor <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/8979593896#Person/caldwell_margaret_r> ; # Margaret R. Caldwell
    schema:contributor <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/8979593896#Person/ardoin_nicole_m_nicole_michele> ; # Nicole Michele Ardoin
    schema:contributor <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/8979593896#Person/dunbar_robert_1960> ; # Robert Dunbar
    schema:copyrightYear "2019" ;
    schema:datePublished "2019" ;
    schema:description "As Pacific societies' rule-making institutions moved toward representative governments, some societies hybridized their customary systems within contemporary governance structures. Hybridized arrangements—structures that integrate customary institutions within constitutional systems—can sustain or lead to adaptive natural resource management strategies. Achieving effective adaptive resource management in a hybridized governance system, however, requires a perspective-based response to the complex socioeconomic and political drivers influencing environmental outcomes. Sociopolitical transformations, for example, may bolster economic development and land-use activities, potentially leading to detrimental ecological effects on watershed resources, such as poor water quality and reduced coral abundance. Examining major drivers of sociopolitical change in a local context can help shed light on resource governance outcomes and barriers to effective adaptive management. In 1994, after 100 years of foreign occupations, the Republic of Palau transitioned from customary rule to an American-style federalist entity. Under this new regime, Palau's small, inhabited land mass (459 km2) was divided into 16 states, each with different institutional arrangements and degrees of authority granted to customary leaders. These transformations ushered in a time of rapid socioeconomic change and intensified land-use activity. Using a mixed methods approach, this dissertation explores the effects of these sociopolitical transformations and the response of Palau's social system to environmental change. First, a historical analysis of state governance structures, their implementation, and watershed management actions was conducted for 10 states. Next, the magnitude of environmental changes from 1985 to 2015, specifically sediment delivery patterns, was assessed by reconstructing coral geochemical signatures of two trace metals, barium and manganese, in two watershed systems. Finally, a policy network analysis of the Belau Watershed Alliance (BWA), a bridging organization created in 2006 to address degrading watershed conditions, was used to examine the causal relationships between network structures and watershed governance actions. Findings show state governance arrangements vary along a gradient of hybridization from constitutional-dominant (level 1) to customary-dominant (level 5). State governments at either end of the gradient—levels 1 and 5—are more conflict-prone and have experienced impediments to watershed management. Coral geochemical findings link the construction of a major ring road that encircles the island (the "Compact Road") and years of heavy rainfall to increased sediment delivery in coral habitats. Different patterns in trace metal ratios between the two watershed systems studied suggest localized land use events as drivers of increased sediment delivery. All coral core samples showed statistically significant increases in trace metals between 2002 and 2007, when public outcry over increased sediment delivery catalyzed creation of the watershed alliance (BWA). The network facilitated by the BWA demonstrates causal relationships between network structures and governance processes. While policy formulation and transformative learning occurred in times of high network density, for example, density was lowest at times when planning and implementation processes were underway. Over the past century, Palau's society has undergone sociopolitical transformations leaving permanent imprints on the nation's institutions, values, and social norms. This research reveals environmental outcomes from these transformations and demonstrates the continued legacy of customary leaders as influencers in resource governance. Upholding cultural institutions may safeguard Palauan society's ability to adapt and respond to future environmental change. The findings from this dissertation may be applicable for other societies facing similar transformations alongside waning customary traditions."@en ;
    schema:exampleOfWork <http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/8979593896> ;
    schema:inLanguage "en" ;
    schema:name "Linking sociopolitical transformations to environmental change : a mixed-methods approach to assessing adaptive watershed governance in the Republic of Palau"@en ;
    schema:productID "1090119786" ;
    schema:url <http://purl.stanford.edu/xx092xs5146> ;
    wdrs:describedby <http://www.worldcat.org/title/-/oclc/1090119786> ;
    .


Related Entities

<http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/8979593896#Organization/stanford_university_department_of_environment_and_resources> # Stanford University. Department of Environment and Resources.
    a schema:Organization ;
    schema:name "Stanford University. Department of Environment and Resources." ;
    .

<http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/8979593896#Person/ardoin_nicole_m_nicole_michele> # Nicole Michele Ardoin
    a schema:Person ;
    schema:familyName "Ardoin" ;
    schema:givenName "Nicole Michele" ;
    schema:givenName "Nicole M." ;
    schema:name "Nicole Michele Ardoin" ;
    .

<http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/8979593896#Person/caldwell_margaret_r> # Margaret R. Caldwell
    a schema:Person ;
    schema:familyName "Caldwell" ;
    schema:givenName "Margaret R." ;
    schema:name "Margaret R. Caldwell" ;
    .

<http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/8979593896#Person/dunbar_robert_1960> # Robert Dunbar
    a schema:Person ;
    schema:birthDate "1960" ;
    schema:familyName "Dunbar" ;
    schema:givenName "Robert" ;
    schema:name "Robert Dunbar" ;
    .

<http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/8979593896#Person/lewis_staci_ann> # Staci Ann Lewis
    a schema:Person ;
    schema:familyName "Lewis" ;
    schema:givenName "Staci Ann" ;
    schema:name "Staci Ann Lewis" ;
    .

<http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/8979593896#Person/monismith_stephen_gene> # Stephen Gene Monismith
    a schema:Person ;
    schema:familyName "Monismith" ;
    schema:givenName "Stephen Gene" ;
    schema:name "Stephen Gene Monismith" ;
    .

<http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/8979593896#Person/richmond_robert> # Robert Richmond
    a schema:Person ;
    schema:familyName "Richmond" ;
    schema:givenName "Robert" ;
    schema:name "Robert Richmond" ;
    .

<http://www.worldcat.org/title/-/oclc/1090119786>
    a genont:InformationResource, genont:ContentTypeGenericResource ;
    schema:about <http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/1090119786> ; # Linking sociopolitical transformations to environmental change : a mixed-methods approach to assessing adaptive watershed governance in the Republic of Palau
    schema:dateModified "2019-03-20" ;
    void:inDataset <http://purl.oclc.org/dataset/WorldCat> ;
    .


Content-negotiable representations

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.