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Logistics management and strategy : competing through the supply chain

Author: Alan Harrison; Remko I van Hoek
Publisher: Harlow, England ; New York : Prentice Hall Financial Times, 2008.
Edition/Format:   Print book : English : 3rd edView all editions and formats
Summary:
Logistic management is a vital part of any business operation. This volume provides up-to-the-minute information on all aspects of strategic planning and business logistics.
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Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Alan Harrison; Remko I van Hoek
ISBN: 9780273712763 0273712764
OCLC Number: 181072692
Description: xxiv, 316 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm
Contents: Machine derived contents note: Contents --
Foreword xv --
Preface xvii --
Acknowledgements xix --
How to use this book xxiii --
Plan of the book xxv --
Part One COMPETING THROUGH LOGISTICS --
1 Logistics and the supply chain 3 --
Introduction 3 --
1.1 Logistics and the supply chain 4 --
1.1.1 Definitions and concepts 6 --
1.1.2 Supply chain: structure and tiering 8 --
1.2 Material flow and information flow 12 --
1.2.1 Material flow 12 --
1.2.2 Information flow 14 --
1.3 Competing through logistics 15 --
1.3.1 Hard objectives 16 --
1.3.2 Supportive capabilities 18 --
1.3.3 Soft objectives 22 --
1.3.4 Order winners and qualifiers 23 --
1.4 Logistics strategy 25 --
1.4.1 Defining â¿¿strategyâ¿¿ 26 --
1.4.2 Aligning strategies 27 --
1.4.3 Differentiating strategies 28 --
Summary 30 --
Discussion questions 31 --
References 31 --
Suggested further reading 32 --
2 Putting the end-customer first 33 --
Introduction 33 --
2.1 The marketing perspective 34 --
2.1.1 Rising customer expectations 35 --
2.1.2 The information revolution 35 --
2.2 Segmentation 36 --
2.3 Quality of service 44 --
2.3.1 Customer loyalty 45 --
2.3.2 Value disciplines 46 --
2.3.3 Customer relationship management (CRM) 47 --
2.3.4 Measuring service quality 50 --
2.4 Setting priorities for logistics strategy 50 --
2.4.1 Step 1: Diagnose current approach to market segmentation 50 --
2.4.2 Step 2a: Understand buying behaviour 52 --
2.4.3 Step 2b: Customer value analysis 53 --
2.4.4 Step 3: Measure logistics strategy driver 54 --
2.4.5 Step 4: Specify future approach to market segmentation 54 --
Summary 57 --
Discussion questions 58 --
References 63 --
Suggested further reading 64 --
3 Value and logistics costs 65 --
Introduction 65 --
3.1 Where does value come from? 66 --
3.1.1 Return on investment (ROI) 67 --
3.1.2 Financial ratios and ROI drivers 69 --
3.2 How can logistics costs be represented? 71 --
3.2.1 Fixed/variable 71 --
3.2.2 Direct/indirect 76 --
3.2.3 Engineered/discretionary 78 --
3.3 Activity-based costing (ABC) 81 --
3.3.1 ABC example 82 --
3.3.2 Costâ¿¿time profile (CTP) 83 --
3.4 A balanced measurement portfolio 85 --
3.4.1 Balanced measures 86 --
3.4.2 Supply chain management and the balanced scorecard 87 --
3.4.3 Supply chain financial model 88 --
3.5 Supply chain operations reference model (SCOR) 89 --
Summary 93 --
Discussion questions 94 --
References 95 --
Suggested further reading 95 --
Part Two LEVERAGING LOGISTICS OPERATIONS --
4 Managing logistics internationally 99 --
Introduction 99 --
4.1 Drivers and logistics implications of internationalisation 101 --
4.1.1 Logistical implications of internationalisation 102 --
4.1.2 Time-to-market 105 --
4.1.3 Global consolidation 106 --
4.1.4 Risk in international logistics 109 --
4.2 The tendency towards internationalisation 111 --
4.2.1 Focused factories: from geographical to product --
segmentation 111 --
4.2.2 Centralised inventories 112 --
4.3 The challenges of international logistics and location 115 --
4.3.1 Extended lead time of supply 116 --
4.3.2 Extended and unreliable transit times 116 --
4.3.3 Multiple consolidation and break points 116 --
4.3.4 Multiple freight modes and cost options 117 --
4.3.5 Location analysis 118 --
4.4 Organising for international logistics 120 --
4.4.1 Layering and tiering 120 --
4.4.2 The evolving role of individual plants 121 --
4.4.3 Reconfiguration processes 122 --
4.5 Reverse logistics 129 --
4.6 Managing for risk readiness 130 --
4.6.1 Immediate risk readiness 130 --
4.6.2 Structural risk readiness 131 --
4.7 Corporate social responsibility in the supply chain 132 --
Summary 136 --
Discussion questions 137 --
References 137 --
Suggested further reading 137 --
5 Managing the lead-time frontier 139 --
Introduction 139 --
5.1 The role of time in competitive advantage 140 --
5.1.1 Time-based competition: definition and concepts 140 --
5.1.2 Time-based initiatives 141 --
5.1.3 Time-based opportunities to add value 141 --
5.1.4 Time-based opportunities to reduce cost 144 --
5.1.5 Limitations to time-based approaches 146 --
5.2 P:D ratios and differences 146 --
5.2.1 Using time as a performance measure 147 --
5.2.2 Using time to measure supply pipeline performance 148 --
5.2.3 Consequences when P-time is greater than D-time 150 --
5.3 Time-based process mapping 153 --
5.3.1 Stage 1: Create a task force 154 --
5.3.2 Stage 2: Select the process to map 154 --
5.3.3 Stage 3: Collect data 155 --
5.3.4 Stage 4: Flow chart the process 155 --
5.3.5 Stage 5: Distinguish between value-adding and --
non-value-adding time 155 --
5.3.6 Stage 6: Construct the time-based process map 156 --
5.3.7 Stage 7: Solution generation 156 --
5.4 Managing timeliness in the logistics pipeline 161 --
5.4.1 Strategies to cope when P-time is greater than D-time 162 --
5.4.2 Practices to cope when P-time is greater than D-time 163 --
5.5 A method for implementing time-based practices 164 --
5.5.1 Step 1: Understand your need to change 165 --
5.5.2 Step 2: Understand your processes 165 --
5.5.3 Step 3: Identify unnecessary process steps and large --
amounts of wasted time 166 --
5.5.4 Step 4: Understand the causes of waste 166 --
5.5.5 Step 5: Change the process 166 --
5.5.6 Step 6: Review changes 166 --
5.5.7 Results 167 --
5.6 When, where and how? 167 --
Summary 168 --
Discussion questions 169 --
References 169 --
Suggested further reading 169 --
6 Supply chain planning and control 171 --
Introduction 171 --
6.1 The supply chain â¿¿game planâ¿¿ 173 --
6.1.1 Planning and control within the focal firm 173 --
6.1.2 Managing inventory in the supply chain 177 --
6.1.3 Inter-firm planning and control 181 --
6.2 Just-in-time (JIT) 184 --
6.2.1 The just-in-time system 185 --
6.2.2 JIT and material requirements planning (MRP) 190 --
6.3 Lean thinking 192 --
6.3.1 The seven wastes 194 --
6.3.2 Application of lean thinking to business processes 195 --
6.3.3 Role of lean practices 196 --
6.3.4 Design strategies 197 --
6.3.5 Lean product design 197 --
6.3.6 Lean facility design 197 --
6.3.7 Lean thinking summary 198 --
Summary 198 --
Discussion questions 199 --
References 200 --
Suggested further reading 201 --
7 The agile supply chain 203 --
Introduction 203 --
7.1 The concept of agility 204 --
7.1.1 Demand characteristics and supply capabilities 206 --
7.1.2 Classifying operating environments 211 --
7.1.3 Preconditions for successful agile practice 214 --
7.1.4 Summary 219 --
7.2 Agile drivers and practices 219 --
7.2.1 Joint decision making to improve external network --
integration 222 --
7.2.2 Developing measures to put the end-customer first 223 --
7.2.3 Shared goals to improve virtual integration 224 --
7.2.4 Boundary-spanning SOP to improve process integration 225 --
Summary 226 --
Discussion questions 227 --
References 228 --
Suggested further reading 229 --
Part Three WORKING TOGETHER --
8 Integrating the supply chain 233 --
Introduction 233 --
8.1 Integration in the supply chain 234 --
8.1.1 Internal integration: function to function 235 --
8.1.2 Inter-company integration: a manual approach 237 --
8.1.3 Electronic integration 238 --
8.2 Efficient consumer response (ECR) 242 --
8.2.1 Category management 243 --
8.2.2 Continuous replenishment 243 --
8.2.3 Enabling technologies 244 --
8.3 Collaborative planning, forecasting and replenishment (CPFR) 248 --
8.3.1 Benefits of electronic collaboration 252 --
8.4 Vendor-managed inventory (VMI) 252 --
8.4.1 How VMI works 253 --
8.4.2 Potential benefits 253 --
8.4.3 Potential problems in setting up a VMI system 254 --
8.5 Quick response (QR) 255 --
8.5.1 JIT/QR relationship 256 --
8.5.2 Role of enabling technologies 256 --
8.6 Managing supply chain relationships 257 --
8.6.1 Creating closer relationships 257 --
8.6.2 Factors in forming supply chain relationships 258 --
Summary 260 --
Discussion questions 261 --
References 262 --
Suggested further reading 263 --
9 Purchasing and supply relationships 265 --
Introduction 265 --
9.1 Choosing. The right supply relationships 266 --
9.2 Partnerships in the supply chain 274 --
9.2.1 Economic justification for partnerships 274 --
9.2.2 Advantages of partnerships 274 --
9.2.3 Disadvantages of partnerships 275 --
9.3 Supply base rationalisation 275 --
9.3.1 Supplier management 276 --
9.3.2 Lead suppliers 276 --
9.4 Supplier networks 277 --
9.4.1 Supplier associations 277 --
9.4.2 Japanese keiretsu 280 --
9.4.3 Italian districts 281 --
9.5 Supplier development 284 --
9.5.1 Integrated processes 285 --
9.5.2 Synchronous production 285 --
9.6 Implementing strategic partnerships 286 --
Summary 290 --
Discussion questions 291 --
References 292 --
Suggested further reading 293 --
Part Four CHANGING THE FUTURE --
10 Logistics future challenges and opportunities 297 --
Introduction 297 --
10.1 Internal alignment 298 --
10.2 Selecting collaborative opportunities upstream and downstream 302 --
10.3 Managing with cost-to-serve to support growth and profitability 305 --
10.4 The supply chain manager of the future 308 --
Summary 310 --
Discussion questions 310 --
References 310 --
Suggested further reading 310 --
Index 311.
Responsibility: Alan Harrison, Remko van Hoek.
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Abstract:

Logistic management is a vital part of any business operation. This volume provides up-to-the-minute information on all aspects of strategic planning and business logistics.

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