Los Angeles documentary and the production of public history, 1958-1977 (Book, 2018) [WorldCat.org]
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Los Angeles documentary and the production of public history, 1958-1977
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Los Angeles documentary and the production of public history, 1958-1977

Author: Joshua Glick
Publisher: Oakland : [California] : University of California press.
Edition/Format:   Print book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
"Los Angeles Documentary and the Production of Public History, 1958-1977 explores how documentarians working between the election of John F. Kennedy and the Bicentennial created conflicting visions of the recent and more distant American past. Drawing on a wide range of primary documents, Joshua Glick analyzes the films of Hollywood documentarians such as David Wolper and Mel Stuart, along with lesser-known  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Films documentaires
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Joshua Glick
ISBN: 9780520293700 0520293703 9780520293717 0520293711
OCLC Number: 1078353973
Description: xiv, 277 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm
Contents: Introduction : beyond fiction : institutions of the real Los Angeles --
Studio documentary in the Kennedy era : Wolper Productions begins --
Downtown development and the endeavors of filmmaker Kent Mackenzie --
The rise of minority storytelling : network news, public television, and independent collectives --
Hard lessons in Hollywood civics : managing the crisis of the liberal consensus --
Wattstax and the transmedia soul economy --
Roots/routes of American identity --
Numbering our days in Los Angeles, USA --
Conclusion : the 1984 Olympics and the neoliberalization of culture.
Responsibility: Joshua Glick.
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Abstract:

"Los Angeles Documentary and the Production of Public History, 1958-1977 explores how documentarians working between the election of John F. Kennedy and the Bicentennial created conflicting visions of the recent and more distant American past. Drawing on a wide range of primary documents, Joshua Glick analyzes the films of Hollywood documentarians such as David Wolper and Mel Stuart, along with lesser-known independents and activists such as Kent Mackenzie, Lynne Littman, and Jesús Salvador Treviño. While the former group reinvigorated a Cold War cultural liberalism, the latter group advocated for social justice in a city plagued by severe class stratification and racial segregation. Glick examines how mainstream and alternative filmmakers turned to the archives, civic institutions, and production facilities of Los Angeles in order to both change popular understandings of the city and shape the social consciousness of the nation"--Provided by publisher

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"Documentary makers who value the opportunity to understand how films of that era got made, and how the production and distribution practices established then continue to influence the market today, Read more...

 
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