The lost world of Scripture : ancient literary culture and biblical authority (Book, 2013) [WorldCat.org]
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The lost world of Scripture : ancient literary culture and biblical authority

Author: John H Walton; D Brent Sandy
Publisher: Downers Grove, Ill. : IVP Academic, cop. 2013.
Edition/Format:   Print book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:

Walton and Sandy summarize what we know of orality and oral tradition as well as the composition and transmission of texts in the ancient Near East and the Greco-Roman world, and how this shapes our  Read more...

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Additional Physical Format: Lost world of scripture
(NL-LeOCL)372984843
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: John H Walton; D Brent Sandy
ISBN: 083084032X 9780830840328 9780830864980 0830864989
OCLC Number: 879878206
Description: 320 p. ; 23 cm
Contents: PrefaceIntroduction Part I. The Old Testament World of Composition and Communication Proposition 1: Ancient Near Eastern societies were hearing-dominant and had nothing comparable to authors and books as we know themProposition 2: Expansions and revisions were possible as documents were copied generation after generation and eventually compiled into literary worksProposition 3: Effective communication must accommodate to the culture and nature of the audienceProposition 4: The Bible contains no new revelation about the workings and understanding of the material world Stepping Back and Summing Up: How the composition of the Old Testament may be understood differently in light of what is known of ancient literary culture Part II. The New Testament World of Composition and Communication Proposition 5: Much of the literature of the Greco-Roman world retained elements of a hearing-dominant cultureProposition 6: Oral and written approaches to literature entail significant differencesProposition 7: Greek historians, philosophers, and Jewish rabbis offer instructive examples of ancient oral cultureProposition 8: Jesus' world was predominantly non-literate and oralProposition 9: Logos/Word referred to oral communication, not to written textsProposition 10: Jesus proclaimed truth in oral forms and commissioned his followers to do the sameProposition 11: Variants were common in the oral texts of Jesus' words and deedsProposition 12: Throughout the New Testament the primary focus was on spoken rather than written wordsProposition 13: Exact wording was not necessary to preserve and transmit reliable representations of inspired truth Stepping Back and Summing Up: How the composition of the New Testament may be understood differently in light of what is known of ancient literary culture Part III. The Biblical World of Literary Genres Proposition 14: The authority of Old Testament narrative literature is more connected to revelation than to historyProposition 15: The authority of Old Testament legal literature is more connected to revelation than to lawProposition 16: The authority of Old Testament prophetic literature is more connected to revelation than to future-tellingProposition 17: The genres of the New Testament are more connected to orality than textuality Part IV. Concluding Affirmations on the Origin and Authority of Scripture Proposition 18: Scripture confirms its fundamental oral natureProposition 19: Scripture asserts its divine source and illocutionProposition 20: Inerrancy has its strengths and weaknessesProposition 21: Belief in authority not only involves what the Bible is but also what we do with it Faithful Conclusions for Virtuous ReadersName and Subjest IndexScripture Index
Responsibility: John H. Walton and D. Brent Sandy.

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