Low-stress bicycling and network connectivity (Book, 2012) [WorldCat.org]
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Low-stress bicycling and network connectivity
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Low-stress bicycling and network connectivity

Author: Maaza C Mekuria; California. Department of Transportation. Office of Research.; United States. Department of Transportation. Research and Innovative Technology Administration.; Mineta Transportation Institute.
Publisher: San Jose, CA : Mineta Transportation Institute, College of Business, San José State University ; [Springfield, VA] : [Available through the National Technical Information Service], [©2012]
Series: MTI report, 11-19.
Edition/Format:   Print book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
For bicycling networks to attract the mainstream population, a critical attribute is low-stress connectivity, that is, providing routes between people's origins and destinations that do not require cyclists to use links that exceed their tolerance for traffic stress, and that do not involve an undue level of detour. A set of criteria are proposed by which road segments, intersection approaches, and intersection  Read more...
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Details

Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Maaza C Mekuria; California. Department of Transportation. Office of Research.; United States. Department of Transportation. Research and Innovative Technology Administration.; Mineta Transportation Institute.
OCLC Number: 805947835
Notes: "May 2012."
"Report no. CA-MTI-12-1005"--Technical report documentation page.
Description: xii, 68 pages : maps ; 28 cm.
Contents: Executive summary --
Introduction --
Levels of traffic stress --
Traffic stress criteria for segments --
Traffic stress criteria for intersection approaches --
Traffic stress criteria for crossings --
Stress mapping --
Census blocks as geographical units of demand --
Summary measures of network connectivity --
Comparing before-after connectivity --
Data and analysis issues --
Conclusions --
Endnotes --
Bibliography.
Series Title: MTI report, 11-19.
Responsibility: by Maaza C. Mekuria [and others].

Abstract:

For bicycling networks to attract the mainstream population, a critical attribute is low-stress connectivity, that is, providing routes between people's origins and destinations that do not require cyclists to use links that exceed their tolerance for traffic stress, and that do not involve an undue level of detour. A set of criteria are proposed by which road segments, intersection approaches, and intersection crossings can be classified into four levels of traffic stress (LTS), of which LTS 2, based on Dutch bikeway design criteria, represents the traffic stress that most adults will tolerate. As a case study, every street in San Jose, California was classified by LTS. Maps in which only lower stress links are displayed reveal a city divided into islands within which low-stress bicycling is possible, but separated from one another by barriers that can only be crossed using high stress links. Such maps can help guide network development by revealing barriers such as arterial streets that lack intersections with both safe crossing provision and low-stress approaches. A summary measure of connectivity, the connectivity ratio for a given LTS, is the fraction of daily trips connected at that LTS.

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