Maimonides and Spinoza : Their Conflicting Views of Human Nature. (eBook, 2012) [WorldCat.org]
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Maimonides and Spinoza : Their Conflicting Views of Human Nature.
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Maimonides and Spinoza : Their Conflicting Views of Human Nature.

Author: Joshua Parens
Publisher: Chicago : University of Chicago Press, 2012.
Edition/Format:   eBook : Document : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
Until the last century, it was generally agreed that Maimonides was a great defender of Judaism, and Spinoza & mdash; as an Enlightenment advocate for secularization & mdash; among its key opponents. However, a new scholarly consensus has recently emerged that the teachings of the two philosophers were in fact much closer than was previously thought. In his perceptive new book, Joshua Parens sets out to challenge  Read more...
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Details

Genre/Form: e-books
Livres numériques
Material Type: Document, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: Joshua Parens
ISBN: 0226645762 1280678283 661365521X 9780226645766 9781280678288 9786613655219
OCLC Number: 1239731704
Language Note: English.
Description: 1 ressource en ligne (236 pages)
Contents: Acknowledgments; Introduction; One / Desire (Shahwa) and Spiritedness (Ghad. ab) vs. Conatus; Two / Veneration vs. Equality; Three / Forms vs. Laws of Nature; Four / Freedom vs. Determinism; Five / Teleology vs. Imagined Ideal; Six / Prudence vs. Imagination; Epilogue; Appendix: Richard Kennington'sSpinoza and Esotericism in Spinoza's Thought; Index.

Abstract:

Until the last century, it was generally agreed that Maimonides was a great defender of Judaism, and Spinoza & mdash; as an Enlightenment advocate for secularization & mdash; among its key opponents. However, a new scholarly consensus has recently emerged that the teachings of the two philosophers were in fact much closer than was previously thought. In his perceptive new book, Joshua Parens sets out to challenge the now predominant view of Maimonides as a protomodern forerunner to Spinoza & mdash; and to show that a chief reason toread Maimonides is in fact to gain distance from our progressi.

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