Mean streets : homelessness, public space, and the limits of capital (eBook, 2020) [WorldCat.org]
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Mean streets : homelessness, public space, and the limits of capital

Author: Don Mitchell
Publisher: Athens : The University of Georgia Press, [2020] ©2020
Series: Geographies of justice and social transformation, 47.
Edition/Format:   eBook : Document : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
"Mean Streets offers, in a single, sustained argument, a theory of the social and economic logic behind the historical development, evolution, and especially persistence of homelessness in the contemporary city. By updating and revisiting thirty years of research and thinking, Don Mitchell explores the conditions that produce and sustain homelessness, and how its persistence relates to the way capital works in the  Read more...
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Details

Genre/Form: Electronic books
Additional Physical Format: Print version:
Mitchell, Don, 1961-
Mean streets.
Athens : The University of Georgia Press, [2020]
(DLC) 2019032948
(OCoLC)1112785669
Material Type: Document, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: Don Mitchell
ISBN: 9780820356914 0820356913
OCLC Number: 1151767935
Description: 1 online resource (xv, 203 pages)
Contents: Part 1. Homelessness as class war. Boise, "Africa," and the limits to capital --
Footloose rebels --
Power abhors a tent --
The criminalization of survival --
Homelessness, public space, and the limits to capital --
Part 2. Mean streets metastasized. The SUV model of citizenship --
Judicial anti-urbanism --
Doing antisocial things.
Series Title: Geographies of justice and social transformation, 47.
Responsibility: Don Mitchell.

Abstract:

Offers, in a sustained argument, a theory of the social and economic logic behind the historical development, evolution, and especially the persistence of homelessness in the contemporary American  Read more...

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