Modernity's ear : listening to race and gender in world music (eBook, 2015) [WorldCat.org]
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Modernity's ear : listening to race and gender in world music
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Modernity's ear : listening to race and gender in world music

Author: Roshanak Kheshti
Publisher: New York : New York University Press, [2015]
Series: Postmillennial pop.
Edition/Format:   eBook : Document : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
"Fearing the rapid disappearance of indigenous cultures, twentieth-century American ethnographers turned to the phonograph to salvage native languages and musical practices. Prominent among these early "songcatchers" were white women of comfortable class standing, similar to the female consumers targeted by the music industry as the gramophone became increasingly present in bourgeois homes. Through these  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Ressources Internet
Additional Physical Format: Version imprimée :
Kheshti, Roshanak.
Modernity's ear
(DLC) 2015014812
(OCoLC)906010842
Material Type: Document, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: Roshanak Kheshti
ISBN: 9781479861125 147986112X
OCLC Number: 1090473134
Description: 1 ressource en ligne (xx, 179 pages) : illustrations.
Contents: The female sound collector and her talking machine --
Listen, Inc. : aural modernity and incorporation --
Losing the listening self in the aural other --
Racial noise, hybridity, and miscegenation in world music --
The world music culture of incorporation --
Epilogue : modernity's radical ear and the sonic infidelity of Zora Neale Hurston's recordings.
Series Title: Postmillennial pop.
Responsibility: Roshanak Kheshti.

Abstract:

"Fearing the rapid disappearance of indigenous cultures, twentieth-century American ethnographers turned to the phonograph to salvage native languages and musical practices. Prominent among these early "songcatchers" were white women of comfortable class standing, similar to the female consumers targeted by the music industry as the gramophone became increasingly present in bourgeois homes. Through these simultaneous movements, listening became constructed as a feminized practice, one that craved exotic sounds and mythologized the 'other' that made them. In Modernity's Ear, Roshanak Kheshti examines the ways in which racialized and gendered sounds became fetishized and, in turn, capitalized on by an emergent American world music industry through the promotion of an economy of desire. Taking a mixed-methods approach that draws on anthropology and sound studies, Kheshti locates sound as both representative and constitutive of culture and power. Through analyses of film, photography, recordings, and radio, as well as ethnographic fieldwork at a San Francisco-based world music company, Kheshti politicizes the feminine in the contemporary world music industry. Deploying critical theory to read the fantasy of the feminized listener and feminized organ of the ear, Modernity's Ear ultimately explores the importance of pleasure in constituting the listening self."--Résumé de l'éditeur.

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"Engaging an impressive range of methodologies,Modernitys Earoffers an astute look into the world music culture industry through the lens of ethnographic entrapment and phonographic subjectivity. Read more...

 
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