Modes of Invasive and Non-invasive Ventilatory Support (Article, 2009) [WorldCat.org]
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Modes of Invasive and Non-invasive Ventilatory Support
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Modes of Invasive and Non-invasive Ventilatory Support

Author: Tony Pickworth Affiliation: Department of Anaesthesia, The Great Western Hospital, Swindon, UK
Edition/Format: Chapter Chapter : English
Summary:
The respiratory system is susceptible to insults from many sources, both intra- and extra-pulmonary, and is the organ system supported most frequently in critically ill patients. In broad terms, the need for respiratory support may arise due to a failure of ventilation or oxygenation. Although institution of mechanical ventilation can be life-saving in these circumstances, it may also lead to ventilator-induced lung  Read more...
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Details

All Authors / Contributors: Tony Pickworth Affiliation: Department of Anaesthesia, The Great Western Hospital, Swindon, UK
ISBN: 978-1-84882-094-4 978-1-84882-095-1
Publication:McLuckie, A., Department of Intensive Care, Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK; Respiratory Disease and its Management; 99-111; London : Springer London
Language Note: English
Unique Identifier: 5661924586
Awards:

Abstract:

The respiratory system is susceptible to insults from many sources, both intra- and extra-pulmonary, and is the organ system supported most frequently in critically ill patients. In broad terms, the need for respiratory support may arise due to a failure of ventilation or oxygenation. Although institution of mechanical ventilation can be life-saving in these circumstances, it may also lead to ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI) through barotrauma, volutrauma and oxygen tox-icity, and strategies to minimise VILI must be incorporated within the overall approach.Developing a consistent approach to mechanical ventilation is made more complex by the myriad of acronyms and trademarked names used by the dif-ferent equipment manufacturers. These serve to confuse by means of having very similar functions and names. In fact there is little evidence for the superiority of one mode of ventilation over another. The aim of this chapter is to explain the basic prin-ciples on which these systems are based, and enable the reader to build a sound strategy for delivering respiratory support to critically ill patients.

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