Molecular politics : developing American and British regulatory policy for genetic engineering, 1972-1982. (Book, 1994) [WorldCat.org]
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Molecular politics : developing American and British regulatory policy for genetic engineering, 1972-1982.
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Molecular politics : developing American and British regulatory policy for genetic engineering, 1972-1982.

Author: Susan Wright
Publisher: [Lieu de publication non identifié] : University of Chicago Press, 1994.
Edition/Format:   Print book : EnglishView all editions and formats
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A comparative study of the development of regulatory policy for genetic engineering in the US and the UK. The author analyzes government responses to the struggles among corporations, scientists,  Read more...

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Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Susan Wright
ISBN: 0226910652 9780226910659
OCLC Number: 468416830
Description: 591 p.
Contents: List of Illustrations Preface Acknowledgments Introduction: Exploring the Boundary between Politics and Science 1: Social Interests in Promoting and Controlling Science and Technology 1.1: Expansion of Government Support for Science, 1945 to the Late 1960s: The United States 1.2: Expansion of Government Support for Science, 1945 to the Late 1960s: The United Kingdom 1.3: Reassessing Science and Technology, 1965-1975 1.4: Deregulation and Selective Growth: 1970s and 1980s 1.5: The Shaping of American and British Science Policy 2: The Social Transformation of Recombinant DNA Technology, 1972-1982 2.1: Anticipations of Genetic Engineering, 1952-1970 2.2: The First Gene-Splicing Experiments, 1969-1973 2.3: Visions of a Commercial Future, 1974-1976 2.4: Genetic Engineering Enters the Business Arena, 1976-1979 2.5: The "Cloning Gold Rush," 1979-1982 2.6: A New Commercial Ethos 2.7: A Transformation of Interest 3: The Emergence and Definition of the Genetic Engineering Issue, 1972-1975 3.2: Social Interests in Genetic Engineering 3.3: Precedents 3.4: Emergence of the Recombinant DNA Issue, 1973-1974 3.5: Initiating Recombinant DNA Policy in the United States and the United Kingdom, 1972-1976 3.6: The Asilomar Conference, 24-27 February 1975 3.7: The Asilomar Legacy 4: Initiating Government Controls in the United States and the United Kingdom, 1975-1976 4.1: The Politics of the NIH Guidelines 4.2: Forming the NIH Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee 4.3: Developing the NIH Guidelines, 1975-1976 4.4: The Hearing before the Director's Advisory Committee, February 1976 4.5: Promulgating the 1976 NIH Guidelines: Industry and the Public Enter the Policy Debate 4.6: The Politics of Genetic Engineering in the United Kingdom 4.7: The Williams Committee and the Formation of British Policy 4.8: Forming the Genetic Manipulation Advisory Group 4.9: The American and British Policy Paradigms: Variations on the Asilomar Legacy 5: Defusing the Controversy: The Politics of Risk Assessment 5.1: The Spread of the Recombinant DNA Controversy 5.2: The Hazard Problem: A Case Study in the Closure of a Technical Controversy 5.3: The Meetings at Bethesda, Falmouth, and Ascot 5.4: Further Sources of "New Evidence" 5.5: The Politics of Risk Assessment 5.6: Dissemination/Legitimation 6: Derailing Legislation, 1977-1978 6.1: The Politics of Government Control of Recombinant DNA Technology 6.2: Biomedical Research as an "Affected Industry" 6.3: The Rise and Fall of Recombinant DNA Legislation 6.4: The Political Impact of the Legislative Defeat 7: Revising the National Institutes of Health Controls, 1977-1978 7.1: The Social and Political Setting 7.2: Revisions Proposed, 1977 7.3: The Director's Advisory Committee Meeting, December 1977 7.4: The Position of Private Industry, December 1977 7.5: Cloning Viral DNA: The Original Problem Reassessed 7.6: Making the Changes: Initiating a Policy Reversal 7.7: Revisions Released, December 1978 8: Operating the Genetic Manipulation Advisory Group, 1977-1978 8.1: The Social and Political Setting 8.2: The Politics of GMAG 8.3: Implementing the Williams Proposals, 1977 8.4: Developing the Brenner Scheme, 1977-1978 9: Dismantling the National Institutes of Health Controls: From Prevention to Crisis Intervention, 1979 9.1: The Social and Political Setting 9.2: Industry, Academe, and the Politics of the NIH Controls 9.3: The Status of the Hazards Debate 9.4: The Wye Meeting 9.5: The New Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee 9.6: The Rowe-Campbell Proposal: The First Move toward Dismantling the NIH Controls 9.7: A Turn in Discourse and Policy 10: Dismantling the National Institutes of Health Controls but Preserving Quasi-regulation, 1980-1982 10.1: Dismantling Controls 10.2: The Evolution of the NIH Industrial Policy 10.3: The Politics of the RAC: Industry, Science, and the Public 11: Dismantling the Genetic Manipulation Advisory Group, 1979-1984 11.1: The Social and Political Setting 11.2: The New GMAG 11.3: Implementing the New Risk Assessment Scheme 11.4: Relaxing Oversight 11.5: Closely Watched Trends: Regulating Industrial Processes 11.6: Terminating GMAG 11.7: Achieving Parity 12: Molecular Politics in a Global Economy Appendix A: Excerpts from Transcript of the Enteric Bacteria Meeting, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, 31 August 1976 Appendix B: New Data on Recombinant DNA Hazards Addressed in Relation to the Rowe-Campbell Proposal Notes Bibliography Index
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