Die Münchner und ihre jüdischen Mitbürger 1900-1950 : im Urteil der NS-Opfer und -Gegner (Book, 2008) [WorldCat.org]
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Die Münchner und ihre jüdischen Mitbürger 1900-1950 : im Urteil der NS-Opfer und -Gegner
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Die Münchner und ihre jüdischen Mitbürger 1900-1950 : im Urteil der NS-Opfer und -Gegner

Author: Konrad Löw
Publisher: München : Olzog, ©2008.
Edition/Format:   Print book : Biography : GermanView all editions and formats
Summary:
Discusses relations and interactions between Germans and Jews in München during the first half of the 20th century. Analyzes memoirs and testimonies (e.g. by Shalom Ben-Chorin, Gershom Scholem, and Eugen Roth), which state that, until the rise of the Nazi regime, Jews were respected as equal citizens. Pp. 81-150 discuss the Nazi period, the boycott against Jewish enterprises, the "Kristallnacht" pogrom, forced  Read more...
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Details

Genre/Form: History
Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Löw, Konrad, 1931-
Münchner und ihre jüdischen Mitbürger 1900-1950.
München : Olzog, ©2008
(OCoLC)680180654
Material Type: Biography
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Konrad Löw
ISBN: 9783789282591 3789282596
OCLC Number: 276415445
Description: 192 pages : illustrations ; 20 cm
Responsibility: Konrad Löw.

Abstract:

Discusses relations and interactions between Germans and Jews in München during the first half of the 20th century. Analyzes memoirs and testimonies (e.g. by Shalom Ben-Chorin, Gershom Scholem, and Eugen Roth), which state that, until the rise of the Nazi regime, Jews were respected as equal citizens. Pp. 81-150 discuss the Nazi period, the boycott against Jewish enterprises, the "Kristallnacht" pogrom, forced labor, deportations, and annihilation. 3,600 Jews were deported in 43 transports; 3,000 were murdered. Some went into hiding and managed to survive; many committed suicide. Nevertheless, after the war, many former residents returned to München. Argues that, if Jews had not felt secure in München even after the boycott, many would have emigrated in time.

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