skip to content
Nathaniel Taylor, New Haven theology, and the legacy of Jonathan Edwards Preview this item
ClosePreview this item
Checking...

Nathaniel Taylor, New Haven theology, and the legacy of Jonathan Edwards

Author: Douglas A Sweeney
Publisher: Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, ©2003.
Series: Religion in America series (Oxford University Press)
Edition/Format:   eBook : Document : Biography : English
Summary:
"In this revisionist study, Douglas A. Sweeney examines why Taylor and his associates counted themselves Edwardsians. He explores what it meant to be an Edwardsian minister and intellectual in the nineteenth century, how the Edwardsian tradition evolved after the death of Edwards himself, how Taylor promoted and eventually fragmented this tradition, and the significance of these developments for the future of
Rating:

(not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first.

Subjects
More like this

Find a copy online

Find a copy in the library

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Finding libraries that hold this item...

Details

Named Person: Jonathan Edwards; Nathaniel W Taylor
Material Type: Biography, Document, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: Douglas A Sweeney
OCLC Number: 1132007293
Notes: Titre de l'écran-titre (visionné le 13 février 2007).
Description: 1 ressource en ligne (xi, 255 p. :) ill., fichier HTML.
Series Title: Religion in America series (Oxford University Press)
Responsibility: Douglas A. Sweeney.

Abstract:

"In this revisionist study, Douglas A. Sweeney examines why Taylor and his associates counted themselves Edwardsians. He explores what it meant to be an Edwardsian minister and intellectual in the nineteenth century, how the Edwardsian tradition evolved after the death of Edwards himself, how Taylor promoted and eventually fragmented this tradition, and the significance of these developments for the future of evangelical America. Taylor's theology has been misconstrued by the vast majority of scholars, argues Sweeney. He has been interpreted variously as a Connecticut liberal, a Jacksonian Arminian, or a moderate Old Calvinist. Nearly all, however, have depicted him as a powerful symbol of the decline of Edwardsian Calvinism and the triumph of democratic liberalism in early national American religion. Sweeney instead sees Taylor as a symbol of the vitality of Edwardsian Calvinism throughout the first half of the nineteenth century, a vitality that calls into question some widely held assumptions about this era. Charting Taylor's contribution to the modification, diversification, and ultimate dissolution of the Edwardsian tradition. Sweeney demonstrates his role in the translation of Edwardsian ideals to the ever-expanding evangelical world that would succeed him."--Résumé de l'éditeur.

"In this revisionist study, Douglas A. Sweeney examines why Taylor and his associates counted themselves Edwardsians. He explores what it meant to be an Edwardsian minister and intellectual in the nineteenth century, how the Edwardsian tradition evolved after the death of Edwards himself, how Taylor promoted and eventually fragmented this tradition, and the significance of these developments for the future of evangelical America. Taylor's theology has been misconstrued by the vast majority of scholars, argues Sweeney. He has been interpreted variously as a Connecticut liberal, a Jacksonian Arminian, or a moderate Old Calvinist. Nearly all, however, have depicted him as a powerful symbol of the decline of Edwardsian Calvinism and the triumph of democratic liberalism in early national American religion. Sweeney instead sees Taylor as a symbol of the vitality of Edwardsian Calvinism throughout the first half of the nineteenth century, a vitality that calls into question some widely held assumptions about this era. Charting Taylor's contribution to the modification, diversification, and ultimate dissolution of the Edwardsian tradition. Sweeney demonstrates his role in the translation of Edwardsian ideals to the ever-expanding evangelical world that would succeed him."--Résumé de l'éditeur.

Reviews

User-contributed reviews
Retrieving GoodReads reviews...
Retrieving DOGObooks reviews...

Tags

Be the first.
Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Linked Data


Primary Entity

<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/1132007293> # Nathaniel Taylor, New Haven theology, and the legacy of Jonathan Edwards
    a schema:CreativeWork, schema:Book, schema:MediaObject ;
    library:oclcnum "1132007293" ;
    library:placeOfPublication <http://id.loc.gov/vocabulary/countries/enk> ;
    library:placeOfPublication <http://dbpedia.org/resource/New_York_City> ; # New York
    library:placeOfPublication <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/9837523250#Place/oxford> ; # Oxford
    schema:about <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/9837523250#Topic/theologie_de_la_nouvelle_angleterre> ; # Théologie de la Nouvelle-Angleterre
    schema:about <http://dewey.info/class/230.58092/e21/> ;
    schema:about <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/9837523250#Person/edwards_jonathan_1703_1758> ; # Jonathan Edwards
    schema:about <http://id.loc.gov/authorities/classification/BX7260> ;
    schema:about <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/9837523250#Topic/theologie_de_new_haven> ; # Théologie de New Haven
    schema:about <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/9837523250#Person/taylor_nathaniel_w_nathaniel_william_1786_1858> ; # Nathaniel William Taylor
    schema:bookFormat schema:EBook ;
    schema:copyrightYear "2003" ;
    schema:creator <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/9837523250#Person/sweeney_douglas_a> ; # Douglas A. Sweeney
    schema:datePublished "2003" ;
    schema:description ""In this revisionist study, Douglas A. Sweeney examines why Taylor and his associates counted themselves Edwardsians. He explores what it meant to be an Edwardsian minister and intellectual in the nineteenth century, how the Edwardsian tradition evolved after the death of Edwards himself, how Taylor promoted and eventually fragmented this tradition, and the significance of these developments for the future of evangelical America. Taylor's theology has been misconstrued by the vast majority of scholars, argues Sweeney. He has been interpreted variously as a Connecticut liberal, a Jacksonian Arminian, or a moderate Old Calvinist. Nearly all, however, have depicted him as a powerful symbol of the decline of Edwardsian Calvinism and the triumph of democratic liberalism in early national American religion. Sweeney instead sees Taylor as a symbol of the vitality of Edwardsian Calvinism throughout the first half of the nineteenth century, a vitality that calls into question some widely held assumptions about this era. Charting Taylor's contribution to the modification, diversification, and ultimate dissolution of the Edwardsian tradition. Sweeney demonstrates his role in the translation of Edwardsian ideals to the ever-expanding evangelical world that would succeed him."--Résumé de l'éditeur." ;
    schema:exampleOfWork <http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/9837523250> ;
    schema:genre "Biography"@en ;
    schema:inLanguage "en" ;
    schema:isPartOf <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/9837523250#Series/religion_in_america_series_oxford_university_press> ; # Religion in America series (Oxford University Press)
    schema:isPartOf <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/9837523250#Series/religion_in_america_series> ; # Religion in America series
    schema:name "Nathaniel Taylor, New Haven theology, and the legacy of Jonathan Edwards" ;
    schema:numberOfPages "255" ;
    schema:productID "1132007293" ;
    schema:publication <http://www.worldcat.org/title/-/oclc/1132007293#PublicationEvent/oxford_new_york_oxford_university_press_c2003> ;
    schema:publisher <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/9837523250#Agent/oxford_university_press> ; # Oxford University Press
    schema:reviews <http://www.worldcat.org/title/-/oclc/1132007293#Review/1542639749> ;
    schema:url <http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/0195154282.001.0001> ;
    wdrs:describedby <http://www.worldcat.org/title/-/oclc/1132007293> ;
    .


Related Entities

<http://dbpedia.org/resource/New_York_City> # New York
    a schema:Place ;
    schema:name "New York" ;
    .

<http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/9837523250#Agent/oxford_university_press> # Oxford University Press
    a bgn:Agent ;
    schema:name "Oxford University Press" ;
    .

<http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/9837523250#Person/edwards_jonathan_1703_1758> # Jonathan Edwards
    a schema:Person ;
    schema:birthDate "1703" ;
    schema:deathDate "1758" ;
    schema:familyName "Edwards" ;
    schema:givenName "Jonathan" ;
    schema:name "Jonathan Edwards" ;
    .

<http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/9837523250#Person/sweeney_douglas_a> # Douglas A. Sweeney
    a schema:Person ;
    schema:familyName "Sweeney" ;
    schema:givenName "Douglas A." ;
    schema:name "Douglas A. Sweeney" ;
    .

<http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/9837523250#Person/taylor_nathaniel_w_nathaniel_william_1786_1858> # Nathaniel William Taylor
    a schema:Person ;
    schema:birthDate "1786" ;
    schema:deathDate "1858" ;
    schema:familyName "Taylor" ;
    schema:givenName "Nathaniel William" ;
    schema:givenName "Nathaniel W." ;
    schema:name "Nathaniel William Taylor" ;
    .

<http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/9837523250#Series/religion_in_america_series> # Religion in America series
    a bgn:PublicationSeries ;
    schema:hasPart <http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/1132007293> ; # Nathaniel Taylor, New Haven theology, and the legacy of Jonathan Edwards
    schema:name "Religion in America series" ;
    .

<http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/9837523250#Series/religion_in_america_series_oxford_university_press> # Religion in America series (Oxford University Press)
    a bgn:PublicationSeries ;
    schema:hasPart <http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/1132007293> ; # Nathaniel Taylor, New Haven theology, and the legacy of Jonathan Edwards
    schema:name "Religion in America series (Oxford University Press)" ;
    .

<http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/9837523250#Topic/theologie_de_la_nouvelle_angleterre> # Théologie de la Nouvelle-Angleterre
    a schema:Intangible ;
    schema:name "Théologie de la Nouvelle-Angleterre"@fr ;
    .

<http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/9837523250#Topic/theologie_de_new_haven> # Théologie de New Haven
    a schema:Intangible ;
    schema:name "Théologie de New Haven"@fr ;
    .

<http://www.worldcat.org/title/-/oclc/1132007293#Review/1542639749>
    a schema:Review ;
    schema:itemReviewed <http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/1132007293> ; # Nathaniel Taylor, New Haven theology, and the legacy of Jonathan Edwards
    schema:reviewBody ""In this revisionist study, Douglas A. Sweeney examines why Taylor and his associates counted themselves Edwardsians. He explores what it meant to be an Edwardsian minister and intellectual in the nineteenth century, how the Edwardsian tradition evolved after the death of Edwards himself, how Taylor promoted and eventually fragmented this tradition, and the significance of these developments for the future of evangelical America. Taylor's theology has been misconstrued by the vast majority of scholars, argues Sweeney. He has been interpreted variously as a Connecticut liberal, a Jacksonian Arminian, or a moderate Old Calvinist. Nearly all, however, have depicted him as a powerful symbol of the decline of Edwardsian Calvinism and the triumph of democratic liberalism in early national American religion. Sweeney instead sees Taylor as a symbol of the vitality of Edwardsian Calvinism throughout the first half of the nineteenth century, a vitality that calls into question some widely held assumptions about this era. Charting Taylor's contribution to the modification, diversification, and ultimate dissolution of the Edwardsian tradition. Sweeney demonstrates his role in the translation of Edwardsian ideals to the ever-expanding evangelical world that would succeed him."--Résumé de l'éditeur." ;
    .


Content-negotiable representations

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.