News 2.0 : can journalism survive the internet? (Book, 2011) [WorldCat.org]
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News 2.0 : can journalism survive the internet?

Author: Martin Hirst
Publisher: Crows Nest, New South Wales, Australia : Allen & Unwin, 2011.
Edition/Format:   Print book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
"There have never been so many ways of producing news and news-like content. From podcasts, to YouTube, blogs and the phenomenal popularity of social media, seismic shifts are underway in global media. News 2.0 bridges the gap between theory and practice to present an integrated approach to journalism that redefines the profession. Key ideas in journalism theory, political economy and media studies are used to  Read more...
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Details

Genre/Form: Blogs
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Martin Hirst
ISBN: 9781742370576 1742370578
OCLC Number: 671954222
Description: xiii, 242 pages : 1 illustration ; 24 cm
Contents: Convergence, journalism and news 2.0 --
Why is journalism in crisis? --
Globalization and the news industry crisis --
The end of the mainstream? --
Is this the end of journalism? --
Journalism in the age of YouTube --
We're all journalists now. Or are we? --
Never mind the quality, feel the rush! --
Networks, Indymedia and the journalism field --
Who pays the messenger(s)? --
Can journalism survive the internet?
Responsibility: Martin Hirst.

Abstract:

"There have never been so many ways of producing news and news-like content. From podcasts, to YouTube, blogs and the phenomenal popularity of social media, seismic shifts are underway in global media. News 2.0 bridges the gap between theory and practice to present an integrated approach to journalism that redefines the profession. Key ideas in journalism theory, political economy and media studies are used to explore the changing cultures of journalism in an historical context. Hirst explains the fragmentation of the mass audience for news products, and how digital commerce has disconnected consumers from real democracy. He argues that journalism requires a restatement of the role of journalists as public intellectuals with a commitment to truth, trust and the public interest."--Publisher description.

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