skip to content
Newton's Sensorium : anatomy of a concept Preview this item
ClosePreview this item
Checking...

Newton's Sensorium : anatomy of a concept

Author: Jamie C Kassler
Publisher: Cham : Springer, ©2018.
Series: Archimedes (Dordrecht, Netherlands), volume 53.
Edition/Format:   eBook : Document : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
In the writings that Newton intended for a public audience, he used the term 'sensorium' in relation to both humans and God. But in the writings of commentators, it has been little recognised that these two usages form a complete concept, so that even today there is no consensus about the meaning of his term. This book, which is written as a process of discovery, not a thesis to be demonstrated, represents the first  Read more...
Rating:

(not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first.

Subjects
More like this

Find a copy online

Links to this item

Find a copy in the library

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Finding libraries that hold this item...

Details

Genre/Form: Electronic books
Additional Physical Format: (OCoLC)1009069387
Named Person: Isaac Newton; Isaac Newton
Material Type: Document, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: Jamie C Kassler
ISBN: 9783319720531 3319720538
OCLC Number: 1035510163
Description: 1 online resource.
Contents: Introduction --
Part I. The sensorium in Newton’s texts: 1. Preliminary remarks. 1.1. The data --
Part II. The human sensorium in context: 2.1. Newton on the sensory-motor system. 2.2. Summary and comment --
Part III. The human sensorium in wider context. 3.1. William Briggs on the visual sensory system. 3.2. Thomas Willis on the nervous system. 3.3. The spectator in the dark room --
Part IV. Generalising to the divine sensorium: 4.1. Taking stock. 4.2. The divine spectator and the cosmic spectacle. 4.3. Afterword: Is infinite space a container? --
Conclusion.
Series Title: Archimedes (Dordrecht, Netherlands), volume 53.
Responsibility: Jamie C. Kassler.

Abstract:

In the writings that Newton intended for a public audience, he used the term 'sensorium' in relation to both humans and God. But in the writings of commentators, it has been little recognised that these two usages form a complete concept, so that even today there is no consensus about the meaning of his term. This book, which is written as a process of discovery, not a thesis to be demonstrated, represents the first systematic investigation of the two parts of Newton's sensorium concept, which is a construct, that is, a concept specially devised for a theory. Therefore, the author sought to discover the meaning of his complete sensorium concept, as well as the model that underlies it, beginning with the human sensorium. This part of his concept is situated, first, in the context of Newton's published writings and, then, in the context of the writings of his contemporaries, William Briggs and Thomas Willis, two English physicians who were at the forefront of their respective specialties, ophthalmology and neurology. Only then is it possible to generalise to the divine sensorium, because Newton's method of reasoning from experience requires that the second part of his concept is last in the order of knowledge. And the reason for this sequence is that Newton's method, which he sometimes referred to as the 'analogy of nature', proceeds from that which has been observed to be universally true to that which is beyond the limits of observation. Consequently, generalisation passes insensibly into reasoning by analogy. During the discovery process, a number of widespread assumptions are called into question, including that Newton can be classed as a theological voluntarist for whom will is superior to intellect, or that, for Newton, not only the material world but also God occupies the whole extent of infinite space. The insights afforded through this book will appeal to historians of natural philosophy and philosophy of mind.

Reviews

User-contributed reviews
Retrieving GoodReads reviews...
Retrieving DOGObooks reviews...

Tags

Be the first.
Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Linked Data


Primary Entity

<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/1035510163> # Newton's Sensorium : anatomy of a concept
    a schema:Book, schema:MediaObject, schema:CreativeWork ;
    library:oclcnum "1035510163" ;
    library:placeOfPublication <http://id.loc.gov/vocabulary/countries/sz> ;
    schema:about <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/5107740526#Topic/senses_and_sensation> ; # Senses and sensation
    schema:about <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/5107740526#Topic/metaphysics> ; # Metaphysics
    schema:about <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/5107740526#Topic/physics_philosophy> ; # Physics--Philosophy
    schema:about <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/5107740526#Topic/science_physics_general> ; # SCIENCE / Physics / General
    schema:about <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/5107740526#Topic/science_mechanics_general> ; # SCIENCE / Mechanics / General
    schema:about <http://dewey.info/class/530.01/e23/> ;
    schema:about <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/5107740526#Topic/science_energy> ; # SCIENCE / Energy
    schema:about <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/5107740526#Person/newton_isaac_1642_1727> ; # Isaac Newton
    schema:author <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/5107740526#Person/kassler_jamie_c> ; # Jamie C. Kassler
    schema:bookFormat schema:EBook ;
    schema:datePublished "2018" ;
    schema:description "Introduction -- Part I. The sensorium in Newton’s texts: 1. Preliminary remarks. 1.1. The data -- Part II. The human sensorium in context: 2.1. Newton on the sensory-motor system. 2.2. Summary and comment -- Part III. The human sensorium in wider context. 3.1. William Briggs on the visual sensory system. 3.2. Thomas Willis on the nervous system. 3.3. The spectator in the dark room -- Part IV. Generalising to the divine sensorium: 4.1. Taking stock. 4.2. The divine spectator and the cosmic spectacle. 4.3. Afterword: Is infinite space a container? -- Conclusion."@en ;
    schema:description "In the writings that Newton intended for a public audience, he used the term 'sensorium' in relation to both humans and God. But in the writings of commentators, it has been little recognised that these two usages form a complete concept, so that even today there is no consensus about the meaning of his term. This book, which is written as a process of discovery, not a thesis to be demonstrated, represents the first systematic investigation of the two parts of Newton's sensorium concept, which is a construct, that is, a concept specially devised for a theory. Therefore, the author sought to discover the meaning of his complete sensorium concept, as well as the model that underlies it, beginning with the human sensorium. This part of his concept is situated, first, in the context of Newton's published writings and, then, in the context of the writings of his contemporaries, William Briggs and Thomas Willis, two English physicians who were at the forefront of their respective specialties, ophthalmology and neurology. Only then is it possible to generalise to the divine sensorium, because Newton's method of reasoning from experience requires that the second part of his concept is last in the order of knowledge. And the reason for this sequence is that Newton's method, which he sometimes referred to as the 'analogy of nature', proceeds from that which has been observed to be universally true to that which is beyond the limits of observation. Consequently, generalisation passes insensibly into reasoning by analogy. During the discovery process, a number of widespread assumptions are called into question, including that Newton can be classed as a theological voluntarist for whom will is superior to intellect, or that, for Newton, not only the material world but also God occupies the whole extent of infinite space. The insights afforded through this book will appeal to historians of natural philosophy and philosophy of mind."@en ;
    schema:exampleOfWork <http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/5107740526> ;
    schema:genre "Electronic books"@en ;
    schema:inLanguage "en" ;
    schema:isPartOf <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/5107740526#Series/archimedes_new_studies_in_the_history_and_philosophy_of_science_and_technology> ; # Archimedes, new studies in the history and philosophy of science and technology ;
    schema:isPartOf <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/5107740526#Series/archimedes_dordrecht_netherlands> ; # Archimedes (Dordrecht, Netherlands) ;
    schema:isSimilarTo <http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/1009069387> ;
    schema:name "Newton's Sensorium : anatomy of a concept"@en ;
    schema:productID "1035510163" ;
    schema:url <http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-72053-1> ;
    schema:url <https://0-link-springer-com.pugwash.lib.warwick.ac.uk/10.1007/978-3-319-72053-1> ;
    schema:url <http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&scope=site&db=nlebk&db=nlabk&AN=1806742> ;
    schema:url <http://link.springer.com/10.1007/978-3-319-72053-1> ;
    schema:url <https://link.springer.com/openurl?genre=book&isbn=978-3-319-72052-4> ;
    schema:url <http://liverpool.idm.oclc.org/login?url=http://link.springer.com/10.1007/978-3-319-72053-1> ;
    schema:url <https://library.smu.ca/login?url=http://link.springer.com/10.1007/978-3-319-72053-1> ;
    schema:workExample <http://worldcat.org/isbn/9783319720531> ;
    schema:workExample <http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-72053-1> ;
    wdrs:describedby <http://www.worldcat.org/title/-/oclc/1035510163> ;
    .


Related Entities

<http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/5107740526#Person/kassler_jamie_c> # Jamie C. Kassler
    a schema:Person ;
    schema:familyName "Kassler" ;
    schema:givenName "Jamie C." ;
    schema:name "Jamie C. Kassler" ;
    .

<http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/5107740526#Person/newton_isaac_1642_1727> # Isaac Newton
    a schema:Person ;
    schema:birthDate "1642" ;
    schema:deathDate "1727" ;
    schema:familyName "Newton" ;
    schema:givenName "Isaac" ;
    schema:name "Isaac Newton" ;
    .

<http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/5107740526#Series/archimedes_dordrecht_netherlands> # Archimedes (Dordrecht, Netherlands) ;
    a bgn:PublicationSeries ;
    schema:hasPart <http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/1035510163> ; # Newton's Sensorium : anatomy of a concept
    schema:name "Archimedes (Dordrecht, Netherlands) ;" ;
    .

<http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/5107740526#Series/archimedes_new_studies_in_the_history_and_philosophy_of_science_and_technology> # Archimedes, new studies in the history and philosophy of science and technology ;
    a bgn:PublicationSeries ;
    schema:hasPart <http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/1035510163> ; # Newton's Sensorium : anatomy of a concept
    schema:name "Archimedes, new studies in the history and philosophy of science and technology ;" ;
    .

<http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/5107740526#Topic/physics_philosophy> # Physics--Philosophy
    a schema:Intangible ;
    schema:name "Physics--Philosophy"@en ;
    .

<http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/5107740526#Topic/science_energy> # SCIENCE / Energy
    a schema:Intangible ;
    schema:name "SCIENCE / Energy"@en ;
    .

<http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/5107740526#Topic/science_mechanics_general> # SCIENCE / Mechanics / General
    a schema:Intangible ;
    schema:name "SCIENCE / Mechanics / General"@en ;
    .

<http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/5107740526#Topic/science_physics_general> # SCIENCE / Physics / General
    a schema:Intangible ;
    schema:name "SCIENCE / Physics / General"@en ;
    .

<http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/5107740526#Topic/senses_and_sensation> # Senses and sensation
    a schema:Intangible ;
    schema:name "Senses and sensation"@en ;
    .

<http://link.springer.com/10.1007/978-3-319-72053-1>
    rdfs:comment "from Springer" ;
    rdfs:comment "(Unlimited Concurrent Users)" ;
    .

<http://worldcat.org/isbn/9783319720531>
    a schema:ProductModel ;
    schema:isbn "3319720538" ;
    schema:isbn "9783319720531" ;
    .

<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/1009069387>
    a schema:CreativeWork ;
    schema:isSimilarTo <http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/1035510163> ; # Newton's Sensorium : anatomy of a concept
    .


Content-negotiable representations

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.