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No-no boy

Author: John Okada; Karen Tei Yamashita
Publisher: [New York, New York] : Penguin Books, 2019. ©2019
Series: Penguin classics.
Edition/Format:   Print book : Fiction : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
"The first Japanese American novel: a powerful, radical testament to the experiences of Japanese American draft resisters in the wake of World War II After their forcible relocation to internment camps during World War II, Japanese Americans were expected to go on with their lives as though nothing had happened, assimilating as well as they could in a changed America. But some men resisted. They became known as  Read more...
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Details

Genre/Form: Fiction
History
Material Type: Fiction
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: John Okada; Karen Tei Yamashita
ISBN: 9780143134015 0143134019
OCLC Number: 1050278644
Notes: "First published in the United States of America by Charles E. Tuttle 1957."
Description: xxv, 210 pages ; 20 cm.
Series Title: Penguin classics.
Responsibility: John Okada ; introduction by Karen Tei Yamashita.

Abstract:

"The first Japanese American novel: a powerful, radical testament to the experiences of Japanese American draft resisters in the wake of World War II After their forcible relocation to internment camps during World War II, Japanese Americans were expected to go on with their lives as though nothing had happened, assimilating as well as they could in a changed America. But some men resisted. They became known as "no-no boys," for twice having answered "no" on a compulsory government survey asking whether they were willing to serve in the U.S. armed forces and to swear allegiance to the United States. No-No Boy tells the story of one such draft resister, Ichiro Yamada, whose refusal to comply with the U.S. government earns him two years in prison and the disapproval of his family and community in Seattle. A touchstone of the immigrant experience in America, it dispels the "model minority" myth and asks pointed questions about assimilation, identity, and loyalty"--

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