The only constant is change : technology, political communication, and innovation over time (eBook, 2018) [WorldCat.org]
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The only constant is change : technology, political communication, and innovation over time

Author: Ben Epstein
Publisher: New York, NY : Oxford University Press, [2018]
Series: Oxford studies in digital politics.
Edition/Format:   eBook : Document : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
"The overarching goals of political communication rarely change, yet political communication strategies have evolved a great deal over the course of American history. As this book argues, these changes (at least the successful ones) occur during brief periods of dramatic and permanent transformation, are driven by political actors and organizations, and tend to follow predictable patterns each time. Covering over  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Electronic books
Additional Physical Format: Print version:
Epstein, Ben, 1978-
Only constant is change.
New York, NY : Oxford University Press, [2018]
(DLC) 2017045029
Material Type: Document, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: Ben Epstein
ISBN: 9780190698997 0190698993 9780190699000 0190699000 9780190699017 0190699019
OCLC Number: 1029865454
Description: 1 online resource
Contents: Introduction : the elements of political communication change --
The social and technological history of political communication change --
The technological imperative : how and when new communication technology becomes politically viable --
Political choice : the behavioral role in political communication change --
Political choice and campaign communication innovation : why campaigns have the most consistent innovation adoption --
Innovation by political outsiders : why social movements innovate early and why it rarely matters --
Interest group innovation : how different target audiences affect political communication goals --
The stabilization process then and now --
Conclusion : where we are and where we might be headed.
Series Title: Oxford studies in digital politics.
Other Titles: Technology, political communication, and innovation over time
Responsibility: Ben Epstein.

Abstract:

"The overarching goals of political communication rarely change, yet political communication strategies have evolved a great deal over the course of American history. As this book argues, these changes (at least the successful ones) occur during brief periods of dramatic and permanent transformation, are driven by political actors and organizations, and tend to follow predictable patterns each time. Covering over 300 years of such changes - what it identifies as Political Communication Revolutions - the book shows how this process of change happens and why. To do this, Ben Epstein, following an American Political Development approach, proposes a new model that accounts for the technological, behavioral, and political factors that lead to revolutionary political communication changes over time. In this way the book moves beyond the technological determinism that characterizes communication history scholarship and the medium-specific focus of much political communication work. The book identifies the political communication revolutions that have, in the United States, led to four, relatively stable political communication orders over history: the elite, mass, broadcast, and (the current) information orders. It identifies and tests three pattern phases of each revolution, ultimately sketching possible paths for the future"--

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