Other people's colleges : the origins of American higher education reform (Book, 2022) [WorldCat.org]
skip to content
Other people's colleges : the origins of American higher education reform
Checking...

Other people's colleges : the origins of American higher education reform

Author: Ethan W Ris
Publisher: Chicago ; London : The University of Chicago Press, 2022.
Edition/Format:   Print book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
"America's constant push to make its colleges and universities more efficient and more accountable is not a new phenomenon. Indeed, in Other People's Colleges, Ethan Ris argues that the reform impulse is baked into American higher education. For well over one hundred years, elite reformers have called for sweeping changes in the sector and raised existential questions about its sustainability. Colleges and  Read more...
Rating:

(not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first.

Subjects
More like this

Find a copy in the library

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Finding libraries that hold this item...

Details

Genre/Form: History
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Ethan W Ris
ISBN: 9780226820194 022682019X 9780226820224 022682022X
OCLC Number: 1274200217
Description: pages cm
Contents: Introduction --
The ethos of reform. The academic engineers; Toward system --
The program of reform. The higher education pyramid; "The practical life"; Separate and unequal --
The decline of reform. The counter-reformation; Organized resistance; A new consensus and a new ethos --
Conclusion: four legacies.
Other Titles: Origins of American higher education reform
Responsibility: Ethan W. Ris.

Abstract:

"America's constant push to make its colleges and universities more efficient and more accountable is not a new phenomenon. Indeed, in Other People's Colleges, Ethan Ris argues that the reform impulse is baked into American higher education. For well over one hundred years, elite reformers have called for sweeping changes in the sector and raised existential questions about its sustainability. Colleges and universities have responded with a combination of resistance and acquiescence. The end result is a sector that has learned to accept top-down reform as part of its existence. When that reform is beneficial (offering major rewards for minor changes), colleges and universities know how to assimilate it. When it is hostile (attacking autonomy or values), they know how to resist it. In the early twentieth century, the "academic engineers," a cadre of elite, external reformers from foundations, businesses, and government, worked to reshape and reorganize the vast base of the higher education pyramid. Their reform efforts were largely directed at the lower tiers of higher education, but their efforts fell short, despite their wealth and power, leaving a legacy of successful resistance that affects every college and university in the United States. Today, another coalition of business leaders, philanthropists, and politicians are again demanding efficiency, accountability, and utility from American higher education. But top-down design is not destiny. Today's reform agenda in higher education should not be viewed as a new existential threat. It is a longstanding fact of life to be assimilated, diverted, or subverted on an ongoing basis"--

Reviews

User-contributed reviews
Retrieving GoodReads reviews...
Retrieving DOGObooks reviews...

Tags

Be the first.
Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.