Paris between empires : monarchy and revolution, 1814-1852 (Audiobook on CD, 2003) [WorldCat.org]
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Paris between empires : monarchy and revolution, 1814-1852

Author: Philip Mansel
Publisher: Princeton, N.J. : Recording for the Blind & Dyslexic, 2003.
Edition/Format:   Audiobook on CD : CD audio : English
Summary:
Paris between 1814 and 1852 was the capital of Europe, a city of power and pleasure, a magnet for people of all nationalities that exerted an influence far beyond the reaches of France. Paris was the stage where the great conflicts of the age, between nationalism and cosmopolitanism, revolution and royalism, socialism and capitalism, atheism and Catholicism, were fought out before the audience of Europe. As Prince  Read more...
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Details

Genre/Form: History
Material Type: Audio book, etc.
Document Type: Sound Recording
All Authors / Contributors: Philip Mansel
OCLC Number: 52764115
Notes: Originally published: New York : St. Martin's Press, 2003, ©2001. 1st U.S. ed.
Originally published: London : J. Murray, ©2001.
Description: 1 audio disc ; 4 3/4 in.
Contents: Death of an empire: Europe takes Paris March-June 1814 --
Paris takes Europe July 1814-March 1815 --
War March-December 1815 --
Chambers and Salons 1815-1820 --
British Parisians 1814-1830 --
Murder at the opera 1820-1824 --
King and country 1824-1829 --
New Jerusalem August 1829-December 1830 --
Blood on the Boulevards 1831-1838 --
City of Ink 1830-1848 --
Nationalists and Europeans 1838-1840 --
Funerals 1840-1844 --
The People 1844-1852 --
Conclusion: Birth of an Empire Versailles, 17 January 1871 --
Appendixes: Royal family of France; Three cousins; Foreign writers, painters and musicians resident in Paris; Franco-British and Franco-Irish marriages.
Other Titles: Paris between empires, 1814-1852.
Responsibility: Philip Mansel.

Abstract:

Paris between 1814 and 1852 was the capital of Europe, a city of power and pleasure, a magnet for people of all nationalities that exerted an influence far beyond the reaches of France. Paris was the stage where the great conflicts of the age, between nationalism and cosmopolitanism, revolution and royalism, socialism and capitalism, atheism and Catholicism, were fought out before the audience of Europe. As Prince Metternich said: When Paris sneezes, Europe catches cold. Not since imperial Rome has one city so dominated European life. [This volume] tells the story of this golden age, from the entry of the allies into Paris on March 31, 1814, after the defeat of Napoleon I, to the proclamation of his nephew Louis-Napoleon, as Napoleon III in the Hotel de Ville on December 2, 1852. During those years, Paris, the seat of a new parliamentary government, was a truly cosmopolitan capital, home to Rossini, Heine, and Princess Lieven, as well as Berlioz, Chateaubriand, and Madame Recamier. Its salons were crowded with artisans and aristocrats from across Europe, attracted by the freedom from the political, social, and sexual restrictions that they endured at home. This was a time, too, of political turbulence and dynastic intrigue, of violence on the streets, and women manipulating men and events from their salons. In describing it, [the author] draws on the unpublished letters and diaries of some of the city's leading figures and of the foreigners who flocked there, among them Lady Holland, two British ambassadors, Lords Stuart de Rothesay and Normanby, and Charles de Flahaut, lover of Napoleon's step-daughter Queen Hortense. This ... book shows that the European ideal was as alive in the nineteenth century as it is today.-Dust jacket.

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