Peoples of the Plateau : the Indian photographs of Lee Moorhouse, 1898-1915 (Book, 2005) [WorldCat.org]
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Peoples of the Plateau : the Indian photographs of Lee Moorhouse, 1898-1915

Author: Steven L Grafe; Lee Moorhouse; National Cowboy and Western Heritage Museum.
Publisher: Norman : University of Oklahoma Press, ©2005.
Series: Western legacies series, v. 2.
Edition/Format:   Print book : State or province government publication : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
"The Columbia River Plateau, in the interior Pacific Northwest, was populated for centuries by the Umatilla, Walla Walla, and Cayuse Indians. By the late nineteenth century, after the U.S. government had confined these peoples to a single reservation, their lives began to change irrevocably. Major Lee Moorhouse, a businessman and former militia officer, served as an Indian agent during this period. Believing that
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Details

Genre/Form: Illustrated works
Pictorial works
Portraits
Named Person: Lee Moorhouse; Lee Moorhouse
Material Type: Government publication, State or province government publication
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Steven L Grafe; Lee Moorhouse; National Cowboy and Western Heritage Museum.
ISBN: 0806137274 9780806137278 0806137428 9780806137421
OCLC Number: 60348865
Notes: "Published in cooperation with the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum."
Description: xiii, 221 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm.
Series Title: Western legacies series, v. 2.
Responsibility: Steven L. Grafe ; foreword by Paula Richardson Fleming.

Abstract:

"The Columbia River Plateau, in the interior Pacific Northwest, was populated for centuries by the Umatilla, Walla Walla, and Cayuse Indians. By the late nineteenth century, after the U.S. government had confined these peoples to a single reservation, their lives began to change irrevocably. Major Lee Moorhouse, a businessman and former militia officer, served as an Indian agent during this period. Believing that the Indians he encountered were a "dying race," Moorhouse was driven to collect their artifacts and, for posterity, take their photographs."

"Although he was not a professional photographer, Moorhouse produced more than 9,000 glass-plate negatives, one-third with Indians as his subjects. Some fifty of his images were published in 1906 in his popular Souvenir Album of Noted Indian Photographs, while others appeared as postcards, prints, or textual images. He reportedly sold 150,000 copies of his photograph The Cayuse Twins. While his works to some degree reflect a stereotypical view, they are an aid for tribal researchers and historians because they identify their subjects by name. In an era when others were seeing their Indian subjects as types, Moorhouse was aware that he was photographing people.

In addition, his images record with some accuracy the everyday styles and dress of turn-of-the-century southern Plateau peoples." "This book marks the first major examination of Moorhouse and his work. Featuring eighty plates, it not only showcases Moorhouse's extensive photographs but also tells the story of the man and of the world in which he lived and worked."--Jacket.

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