Peoples on parade : exhibitions, empire, and anthropology in nineteenth century Britain (eBook, 2011) [WorldCat.org]
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Peoples on parade : exhibitions, empire, and anthropology in nineteenth century Britain
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Peoples on parade : exhibitions, empire, and anthropology in nineteenth century Britain

Author: Sadiah Qureshi
Publisher: Chicago ; London : University of Chicago Press, 2011.
Edition/Format:   eBook : Document : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
In May 1853, Charles Dickens paid a visit to the & ldquo;savages at Hyde Park Corner, & rdquo; an exhibition of thirteen imported Zulus performing cultural rites ranging from songs and dances to a & ldquo;witch-hunt & rdquo; and marriage ceremony. Dickens was not the only Londoner intrigued by these & ldquo;living curiosities & rdquo;: displayed foreign peoples provided some of the most popular public entertainments  Read more...

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Details

Material Type: Document, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: Sadiah Qureshi
ISBN: 9780226700984 0226700984 1283242338 9781283242332
OCLC Number: 1105489995
Description: 1 online resource (382 p. :) il.
Contents: Introduction: Ladies and Gentlemen, I Bring You . . .; Part One: Street Spectacles; 1: Glimpsing Urban Savages; 2: Artful Promotion; Part Two: Metropolitan Encounters; 3: Managing Performance; 4: Recruiting Entertainers; 5: Interpreting Exhibitions; Part Three: The Natural History of Race; 6: Transforming "Unfruitful Wonder"; 7: The End of an Affair; Conclusion: Afterlives; Acknowledgments; Appendix: Terminology; Abbreviations; Notes; Bibliography; Index.
Responsibility: Sadiah Qureshi.

Abstract:

In May 1853, Charles Dickens paid a visit to the & ldquo;savages at Hyde Park Corner, & rdquo; an exhibition of thirteen imported Zulus performing cultural rites ranging from songs and dances to a & ldquo;witch-hunt & rdquo; and marriage ceremony. Dickens was not the only Londoner intrigued by these & ldquo;living curiosities & rdquo;: displayed foreign peoples provided some of the most popular public entertainments of their day. At first, such shows tended to be small-scale entrepreneurial speculations of just a single person or a small group. By the end of the century, performers were being imported.

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