Poems and essays (eBook, 1973) [WorldCat.org]
skip to content
Poems and essays
Checking...

Poems and essays

Author: Joseph Howe
Publisher: [Toronto], [Buffalo] University of Toronto Press [1973]
Series: Literature of Canada; poetry and prose in reprint
Edition/Format:   eBook : Document : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
"This volume, containing a selection of the poetry and prose of Joseph Howe, presents various aspects of a fascinating man who few Canadian know as other than the 'tribune of Nova Scotia' and a political giant of colonial times. Yet Howe was also a writer, and a good one. His intuitive grasp and pragmatic skill in political affairs were combined with wide-ranging intellectual curiosity, strong moral idealism, and a  Read more...
Rating:

(not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first.

Subjects
More like this

Find a copy online

Links to this item

Find a copy in the library

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Finding libraries that hold this item...

Details

Genre/Form: Electronic books
Additional Physical Format: Print version:
Howe, Joseph, 1804-1873.
Poems and essays.
[Toronto], [Buffalo] University of Toronto Press [1973]
(DLC) 73078943
(OCoLC)705048
Material Type: Document, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: Joseph Howe
ISBN: 9781487590314 1487590318 9781487599706 1487599706
OCLC Number: 655073123
Description: 1 online resource (xxxvi, 341 pages)
Contents: Frontmatter --
Preface --
Introduction --
Bibliographical Note --
Introduction --
Acadia --
Sable Island --
The Stewiacke --
Melville Island --
The Flag Of Old England --
Our Fathers --
Song For The 8th June --
The Streams --
Thanksgiving Hymn --
My Native Pines --
Fame --
La Tribune --
Home --
To The Queen --
Making Land --
The Rhine --
Coming Home --
Saturday Night At Sea --
The Stormy Petrel --
The Coaster --
The Song Of The Micmac --
The Wild Cherry Tree --
The Micmac --
My Father --
Glide Merrily On My Little Skiff --
To My Wife --
To My Sister Jane --
To Susan Ann --
Oh think not that my heart can e'er --
Nay, chide me not --
The Beach --
Tho' Time may steal the roseate blush --
Song --
The Birth Day --
The Wedding Day --
To Ellen --
A Love Song --
The Unseen Babe --
To Jane --
To Sophia --
To a Lady --
To M.J.K. --
To Mary --
To Ann --
Oh! It would more than transport be --
Lines written in an Album --
To Valentine --
Farewell my Brother --
Farewell --
To Sarah --
The Birth-day --
Written in a Bible --
To Woman --
What is a Friend? --
The Promise --
The Three Flowers --
To Mrs. Norton --
To Fancy --
The Blue Nose --
Friendship's Garden --
Tears --
The Travellers --
To the Moose --
The Talbots --
Cornelia!s Answer --
Cincinnatus --
To the Mayflower --
To the Linnet --
To the Fire-fly --
The Deserted Nest --
To a Rose --
The Wreath --
To the Town Clock --
A Toast --
The Fancy Ball No I --
The Fancy Ball No 2 --
Tom's Apology --
Once more I put my Bonnet on --
A New Member --
Epigrams --
Essays --
Shakspeare Oration --
Lecture on Eloquence --
Lecture on the Moral Influence of Woman --
Address at the Howe Family Gathering --
The Locksmith of Philadelphia, (a tale) --
Address --
Index
Series Title: Literature of Canada; poetry and prose in reprint
Responsibility: Introd. by M.G. Parks.
More information:

Abstract:

"This volume, containing a selection of the poetry and prose of Joseph Howe, presents various aspects of a fascinating man who few Canadian know as other than the 'tribune of Nova Scotia' and a political giant of colonial times. Yet Howe was also a writer, and a good one. His intuitive grasp and pragmatic skill in political affairs were combined with wide-ranging intellectual curiosity, strong moral idealism, and a lively imagination. He revealed a vigorous strength in journalism and politics, in public life in general, and in his prose. His poetry admittedly was minor and colonial -- he cultivated eighteenth-century verse models and habits of diction, which made him a second-generation Romantic in attitude and tone rather than in style -- and its merit, according to David Munroe, Dalhousie Review, XX, 1941, 'lies principally in the deep sincerity which is characteristic of all good verse.' However, to understand the man and his times it is essential to understand the full extent of his endeavours; hence the significance of this book. The selections in this volume were assembled after Howe's death by his ninth child, Sydenham. They include the unfinished poem 'Acadia, ' various serious and sentimental poems, five essays originally written and delivered as speeches, and a moral tale entitled 'The Locksmith of Philadelphia.'"--Publisher's description

Reviews

User-contributed reviews
Retrieving GoodReads reviews...
Retrieving DOGObooks reviews...

Tags

Be the first.
Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.