The politics of music in the Third Reich (Book, 1991) [WorldCat.org]
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The politics of music in the Third Reich

Author: Michael Meyer
Publisher: New York : P. Lang, ©1991.
Series: American university studies., Series IX,, History ;, v. 49.
Edition/Format:   Print book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
Music, the most beloved of the arts in Germany, began to be ideologized in Wagner's time. During the Nazi period, both music and musicology were adapted to the needs of the new regime, including "de-Judaization". The official Nazi policy in the first stage was segregation of Jewish musicians from Aryans. Jews were eliminated from the all-German musical scene, and the Jüdischer Kulturbund was established. In the  Read more...
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Details

Genre/Form: Criticism, interpretation, etc
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Michael Meyer
ISBN: 0820408050 9780820408057
OCLC Number: 19672799
Notes: Includes index.
Description: xiv, 416 pages, [13] of plates : illustrations, pls., music ; 24 cm.
Contents: PART 1: 1933 --
NAZI POWER, PURGES, AND REVOLUTIONARY PROMISE --
Gleichschaltung of the Press: An Area that Counted --
Instrumental Music Journalism --
Gleichschaltung of the Academy --
Gleichschaltung of Church Music --
Centralized Control and Manipulated Ideals --
A Singing Ideological Posture --
Segregated Jewish Music --
PART 2: MUSIC ORGANIZATION 1933-1945 --
Propaganda (RMVP) and Culture (RKK) --
Reich Music Chamber (RMK) --
Composers: Supreme Expectations --
The Corporate Body of Musicians --
Concert Management and Promotion --
Romanticism of Steel in Choral and Folk Music --
Music Publishers and Dealers --
RMK Reality and Achievements --
Totalitarian Controls: Other Power Centers --
Music Foreign Policy --
Music in Occupied Countries --
Means and Ends: The Goebbels-Rosenberg Rivalry --
Some Individual Portraits --
Organizational Success --
PART 3: RACE, FOLK HERO AND THE NEW GERMAN MUSICIAN --
The Musicologist as Myth Maker: Jews and Germans as Ideal Types --
The Myth of the Folk-Musical Community --
Search for the New Music --
The National Socialist Masterwork of the Future --
The New Peoples Opera --
Anti-Fascist Music: Karl Amadeus Hartmann --
The Fraud of a Music Theory --
PART 4: WILHELM FURTWANGLER: COLLABORATION AND A STRUGGLE OF AUTHORITY --
The Drama of Confrontation --
Transcendent Music in Totalitarian Society --
Rehabilitation --
An Apolitical Contrast: Strauss --
Hitlers Social Revolution.
Series Title: American university studies., Series IX,, History ;, v. 49.
Responsibility: Michael Meyer.

Abstract:

Music, the most beloved of the arts in Germany, began to be ideologized in Wagner's time. During the Nazi period, both music and musicology were adapted to the needs of the new regime, including "de-Judaization". The official Nazi policy in the first stage was segregation of Jewish musicians from Aryans. Jews were eliminated from the all-German musical scene, and the Jüdischer Kulturbund was established. In the struggle of the Nazi cultural establishment against "degenerative music", jazz and atonal music were ascribed to Jewish influence. German musicology also underwent "nazification". One of its tasks was to demonstrate that the composers of Jewish extraction had not contributed to German music. Ch. 4 (pp. 329-393) discusses Wilhelm Furtwaengler and argues that despite his good relations with the Nazi state, the conductor boldly defended Jewish musicians.

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