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Pop song piracy : disobedient music distribution since 1929

Author: Barry Dean Kernfeld
Publisher: Chicago ; London : University of Chicago Press, ©2011.
Edition/Format:   Print book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
The music industry's ongoing battle against digital piracy is just the latest skirmish in a long conflict over who has the right to distribute music. Starting with music publishers' efforts to stamp out bootleg compilations of lyric sheets in 1929, Barry Kernfeld's Pop Song Piracy details nearly a century of disobedient music distribution from song sheets to MP3s. In the 1940s and '50s, Kernfeld reveals, song sheets  Read more...
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Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Barry Dean Kernfeld
ISBN: 9780226431826 0226431827 9780226431833 0226431835
OCLC Number: 672300127
Description: xii, 273 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
Contents: Tin Pan Alley's near-perfect distribution system --
Bootlegging song sheets --
The content and uses of song sheets --
Fake books and music photocopying --
Pirate radio in Northwestern Europe --Illegal copying of phonograph records --
Illegal copying of tapes --
Bootleg albums as unauthorized new releases --
Illegal copying of compact discs --
Song sharing.
Other Titles: Disobedient music distribution since 1929
Responsibility: Barry Kernfeld.

Abstract:

Starting with music publishers' efforts to stamp out bootleg compilations of lyric sheets in 1929, this title details nearly a century of disobedient music distribution, from song sheets to MP3s.  Read more...

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"Kernfeld's rich and stimulating book makes a significant contribution to current debates over technology, copying, piracy, and the political economy of the music industry. He clarifies not just the Read more...

 
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