Power to the People : Energy in Europe over the Last Five Centuries. (eBook, 2014) [WorldCat.org]
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Power to the People : Energy in Europe over the Last Five Centuries.

Author: Astrid Kander; Paolo Malanima; Paul Warde
Publisher: Princeton : Princeton University Press, 2014.
Series: Princeton economic history of the Western world.
Edition/Format:   eBook : Document : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
Power to the People examines the varied but interconnected relationships between energy consumption and economic development in Europe over the last five centuries. It describes how the traditional energy economy of medieval and early modern Europe was marked by stable or falling per capita energy consumption, and how the First Industrial Revolution in the eighteenth century--fueled by coal and steam engines--redrew  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Electronic book
Electronic books
History
Additional Physical Format: Print version:
Kander, Astrid.
Power to the people : energy in Europe over the last five centuries.
Princeton, NJ : Princeton University Press, [2013]
x, 457 pages
(DLC) 17880472
Material Type: Document, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: Astrid Kander; Paolo Malanima; Paul Warde
ISBN: 0691143625 9780691143620 1306160227 9781306160223 9781400848881 1400848881
OCLC Number: 952777361
Description: 1 online resource (473 pages).
Contents: Cover; Title; Copyright; Contents; Preface; CHAPTER ONE: Introduction; CHAPTER TWO: Definitions and Concepts; PART I: Pre-Industrial Economies; CHAPTER THREE: Traditional Sources; 1. Energy in Premodern Societies; 2. Organic Sources and Agricultures; 3. Non-organic Sources; 4. Seven Long-run Propositions; 5. Conclusion; CHAPTER FOUR: Constraints and Dynamics; 1. Population and Climate; 2. Energy Scarcity; 3. Saving Land; 4. Saving Labor; 5. Conclusion; PART II: The First Industrial Revolution; CHAPTER FIVE: A Modern Energy Regime; 1. The Take-off of Coal. 2. Traditional Sources: Rise but Relative Decline3. Conclusion; CHAPTER SIX: The Coal Development Block; 1. The Core Innovations; 2. The Growth Dynamics of the Coal Development Block; 3. The Transport Revolution; CHAPTER SEVEN: Energy and Industrial Growth; 1. Coal and Growth; 2. Seven Long-run Propositions; 3. Energy Intensity and Economic Structure; 4. Conclusion; PART III: The Second and Third Industrial Revolutions; CHAPTER EIGHT: Energy Transitions in the Twentieth Century; 1. The Rise of Oil and Electricity; 2. Old and New in Energy Regimes; 3. Conclusion. CHAPTER NINE: Major Development Blocks in the Twentieth Century and Their Impacts on Energy1. The ICE-Oil Block; 2. The Electricity Block; 3. The ICT Development Block; 4. Conclusion; CHAPTER TEN: The Role of Energy in Twentieth-Century Economic Growth; 1. Development Blocks and GDP; 2. Seven Long-run Propositions; 3. Energy Intensity and Economic Structure; CHAPTER ELEVEN: Summary and Implications for the Future; 1. Summing Up the Book; 2. Thinking about the Future; 3. Some Remarks about the Future; APPENDIXES; A. The Role of Energy in Growth Accounting. B. Decomposing Energy Intensity 1870-1970C. The Impact from the Service Transition on Energy Intensity; D. Biased Technical Development; References; Index.
Series Title: Princeton economic history of the Western world.
Other Titles: Princeton Economic History of the Western World
Princeton Economic History of the Western World : Power to the People : Energy in Europe over the Last Five Centuries

Abstract:

Power to the People examines the varied but interconnected relationships between energy consumption and economic development in Europe over the last five centuries. It describes how the traditional energy economy of medieval and early modern Europe was marked by stable or falling per capita energy consumption, and how the First Industrial Revolution in the eighteenth century--fueled by coal and steam engines--redrew the economic, social, and geopolitical map of Europe and the world. The Second Industrial Revolution continued this energy expansion and social transformation through th.

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