The primitive, the aesthetic, and the savage : an enlightenment problematic (Book, 2012) [WorldCat.org]
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The primitive, the aesthetic, and the savage : an enlightenment problematic

Author: Tony C Brown
Publisher: Minneapolis : University of Minnesota Press, ©2012.
Edition/Format:   Print book : State or province government publication : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
Tony C. Brown examines "the inescapable yet infinitely troubling figure of the not-quite-nothing" in Enlightenment attempts to think about the aesthetic and the savage. The various texts Brown considers--including the writings of Addison, Rousseau, Kant, and Defoe--turn to exotic figures in order to delimit the aesthetic, and to aesthetics in order to comprehend the savage. In his intriguing exploration Brown  Read more...
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Details

Genre/Form: Criticism, interpretation, etc
Literary criticism
Material Type: Government publication, State or province government publication
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Tony C Brown
ISBN: 9780816675623 0816675627 9780816675630 0816675635
OCLC Number: 788275035
Description: xxi, 278 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm
Contents: Introduction: An enlightenment problematic --
The primitive --
The aesthetic --
The savage --
Joseph Addison's China --
Kant's tattooed New Zealanders --
Adding history to a footprint in Robinson Crusoe --
Indian mounds in the end-of-the-line mode --
Conclusion: ... as if Europe existed.
Responsibility: Tony C. Brown.
More information:

Abstract:

Tony C. Brown examines "the inescapable yet infinitely troubling figure of the not-quite-nothing" in Enlightenment attempts to think about the aesthetic and the savage. The various texts Brown considers--including the writings of Addison, Rousseau, Kant, and Defoe--turn to exotic figures in order to delimit the aesthetic, and to aesthetics in order to comprehend the savage. In his intriguing exploration Brown discovers that the primitive introduces into the aesthetic and the savage an element that proves necessary yet difficult to conceive. At its most profound, Brown explains, this element engenders a loss of confidence in one's ability to understand the human's relation to itself and to the world. That loss of confidence--what Brown refers to as a breach in anthropological security--traces to an inability to maintain a sense of self in the face of the New World. Demonstrating the impact of the primitive on the aesthetic and the savage, he shows how the eighteenth-century writers he focuses on struggle to define the human's place in the world. As Brown explains, these authors go back again and again to "exotic" examples from the New World--such as Indian burial mounds and Maori tattooing practice--making them so ubiquitous that they come to underwrite, even produce, philosophy and aesthetics.

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