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Principles of counseling and psychotherapy : learning the essential domains and nonlinear thinking of master practitioners

Author: Gerald J Mozdzierz; Paul R Peluso; Joseph Lisiecki
Publisher: New York : Routledge, 2014.
Edition/Format:   Print book : English : Second editionView all editions and formats
Summary:
Research has shown that the most effective way to prepare students for practice with real clients is to learn to think in a new way rather than simply learning and using a set of steps. While there is much to be learned from what master practitioners do in their sessions, there is even more knowledge to gain from learning how they think. The second edition of Principles of Counseling and Psychotherapy offers  Read more...
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Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Gerald J Mozdzierz; Paul R Peluso; Joseph Lisiecki
ISBN: 9780415704601 041570460X 9780415704618 0415704618
OCLC Number: 854541719
Description: xxiii, 384 pages ; 26 cm
Contents: Machine generated contents note: The Problem of the Sorcerer's Apprentice --
Learning from Experts-Those Who Demonstrate Their Effectiveness --
How Do Master Clinicians Achieve Mastery? --
Learning to Think Like a Therapist: The Characteristics of Expert Therapist Thinking and Why It Is Important --
Linear versus Nonlinear Thinking --
Nonlinear Thinking --
Clinical Case Example: A Broken Heart and Obsessing --
Am I a Nonlinear Thinker? --
Exercising Your Nonlinear Thinking --
Expertise and Learning How to Think Like a Practitioner --
How We Will Do It: Development of Mastery and Deliberate Practice --
So How Will We Do This? --
The Purpose of This Book --
The Current State of Psychotherapy --
Therapy Is Effective in Helping People with Mental Disorders, Adjustment Problems, and Relational Difficulties in Life --
Therapy Can Be Effective Quickly and Is a Cost-Effective Treatment --
Despite These Potential Benefits, Therapy Is Ineffective and Underutilized. Contents note continued: The Painful Truth: Effective Therapy Is Not Being Provided on a Consistent Basis --
Improving the Process of Learning How to Become an Effective Therapist: Proposed Solutions and Their Limitations --
The Movement toward Manualization or Evidence-Based Psychological Practices --
The Search for an Integrated Approach to Therapy --
Research and the Convergence of Understanding: Learning and Understanding the Seven Domains of Competence --
What Are Domains? --
What Domains Are Not --
Introducing the Seven Domains of Competence --
A Developmental Model of Therapist Growth: Guiding the Reader through the Learning Process to Help Speed Understanding of the Seven Domains of Competence and Nonlinear Thinking --
Stoltenberg's Developmental Model --
Integrating Stoltenberg's Developmental Model with the Seven Domains --
Conclusion --
Self-versus-Other Focus --
Anxiety --
The Quest for Perfection --
Insecurity --
Underdeveloped Sense of Clinical judgment. Contents note continued: Where to Begin? --
Introduction: The Mob Boss Is Your Client --
Clinician Attitude and Disposition: Curiosity --
Listening --
How Do You Listen in a Linear Way? --
Listening for Content or Information --
Listening for Feelings --
How to Listen in a Nonlinear Way --
Congruence (i.e., Correspondence-or Lack of Correspondence-between What Is Said and What Is Meant) --
Listening for Absence (i.e., What Is Not Said-by Silence, Avoidance, or Information Overload) --
Listening for Presence (Nonverbal Behaviors That Add Meaning) --
Listening for Inference (The Purpose behind "I Don't Want ..." Statements) --
Listening for Resistance: The Desire Not to Change-, --
Our Nonlinear Brain: Mirror Neurons and Connecting with a Client --
Possible Meanings Associated with Statements in Clinical Exercise: Beginning the Use of Nonlinear Thinking --
Introduction --
Linear Responding --
Responding to Content or-Information --
Responding to Feelings. Contents note continued: Advanced Linear responding --
Nonlinear Responding --
Nonlinear Responding to Incongruence (i.e., "I Hear-That There Is More Than One Side to This.") --
Nonlinear Responding to Absence (i.e., "I See What You Are Not Showing Me.") --
Nonlinear Responding to Presence (i.e., "I See What Your Body-Is Saying Even if You Don't.") --
Nonlinear Responding to Inference (i.e., "I Hear What You Are Not Saying.") --
Nonlinear Responding to Resistance (i.e., "I Understand That You Might Not Be Ready for This.") --
Conclusion --
Introduction: Every Story Must Have a Beginning, Middle, and an End --
Assessing the Client: Symptoms, Diagnoses, Strengths, and (Untapped) Resources --
Linear Methods of Assessment: Looking for Symptoms and Diagnoses --
The Goal of the Biopsychosocial Interview --
Linear Methods of Assessment: Looking for Strengths and Resources --
Nonlinear Methods of Assessing for Strengths and Resources --
Looking for Unused or Misused Power. Contents note continued: Connecting with Untapped Social Supports --
Assessing a Client's Readiness for Change: The Stages of Change Model --
Precontemplation --
Contemplation --
Preparation for Action --
Action --
Maintenance --
Relapse --
How to Identify a Client's Stage of Change --
Moving through the Stages of Change --
Conclusion --
Introduction --
Assessment: The Theme behind a Client's Narrative --
Theme of Desperation: "I Have a Problem That I Need to Work On!" --
Theme of Helplessness: The Symptom Is Out of Control ("I Can't Help Myself") --
Theme of Hopelessness: "I Have a Chronic Problem" --
Theme of Defensiveness: "Who or What Is the Problem? (Cause It's Not Me!)" --
Theme of Exhaustion: Being Overwhelmed (Physically, Emotionally, and/or Psychologically) --
Theme of Despair: The Experience of Loss --
Theme of Fear and Confusion: Double Binds --
Therapeutic Goals --
Making Good Therapeutic Goals --
Treatment Plans --
What Happens When Goals Don't Align? Contents note continued: Conclusion --
Introduction: The King's Speech --
Research Findings: The Therapeutic Relationship and the Therapeutic Alliance --
Factors that Contribute to the Therapeutic Relationship --
Selected Findings of the First Task Force (2002) --
Selected Findings of the Second Task Force (2011) --
Demonstrably Effective Element of the Therapeutic Relationship: The Therapeutic Alliance --
Positive Affective Bond --
Therapeutic Tasks --
Consensus on Goals --
Research on the Therapeutic Alliance --
Conclusions on the Therapeutic Alliance --
Demonstrably Effective Element of the Therapeutic Relationship: Empathy --
Empathic Rapport --
Communicative Attunement --
Person Empathy --
Demonstrably Effective Elements of the Therapeutic Relationship: Collecting Client Feedback --
Probably Effective Elements of the Therapeutic Relationship: Positive Regard --
Conclusion --
Introduction. Contents note continued: Promising Elements of the Therapeutic Relationship (But Insufficient Research to Judge): Congruence/Genuineness --
Promising Elements of the Therapeutic Relationship (But Insufficient Research to Judge): Managing Transference and Countertransference --
Countertransference --
Promising Elements of the Therapeutic Relationship (But Insufficient Research to Judge): Ruptures to the Therapeutic Alliance --
Therapeutic Ruptures and Nonlinear Thinking --
Identifying Ruptures to the Therapeutic Alliance --
Repairing Ruptures to the Therapeutic Alliance --
Methods of Adapting the Therapeutic Relationship --
Demonstrably Effective Method of Adapting the Therapeutic Relationship: Reactance/Resistance --
Reactance --
Demonstrably Effective Method of Adapting the Therapeutic Relationship: Client Preference --
Demonstrably Effective Method of Adapting the Therapeutic Relationship: Culture/Religion/Spirituality --
Ethically Maintaining the Therapeutic Relationship. Contents note continued: Boundary and Role Management I Boundaries --
Ethics and Boundaries --
Boundary and Role Management II Multiple Roles --
Flexibility of Boundaries --
Boundary and Role Management III Therapist Self-Disclosure --
Harm from Disclosure --
What Not to Do in a Therapeutic Relationship --
Conclusion --
Focus of Attention --
Decreased Level of Anxiety --
The Development of Understanding and Nonlinear Thinking --
Introduction: The Shawshank Schema --
What Are Schemas? Where Do They Come from? --
Three General Characteristics of Schemas --
A Historical Overview of Schemas in Therapy --
Schemas Help Guide Our Responses to New Experiences --
Personality Development and Core Schema Dynamics --
View of Self --
View of Self and Optimism --
View of Self and the Family of Origin --
View of Others --
View of Others: Positive or Negative --
View of Others and the Family of Origin --
View of the World and View of Life --
View of Life and the World, and Family of Origin. Contents note continued: Universal Characteristics of Schemas --
Conclusion --
Introduction --
Schema Dynamics and Cognitive Distortions --
Schema Dynamics, Cognitive Distortions, and Psychological Disorders --
Schema Dynamics and the Development of Personality Disorders --
Linear Thinking, Listening, and Responding to Core Client Schemas --
Nonlinear Thinking, Listening, and Responding to Core Client Schemas --
Rigid Schema Dynamics and Linear and Nonlinear Listening. Absolutes, Dichotomies, Extremes, Polarities, and Exclusionary Thinking --
Elements of Formal Assessment in Understanding a Client's Schema Dynamics --
Readiness for Change --
Client Resources --
Themes --
Client Goals --
Using the Therapeutic Relationship to Better Understand a Client's Schema Dynamics --
Therapeutic Alliance --
Therapeutic Ruptures and Client Schemas --
Utilizing Assessment of Client Schema Dynamics --
Using Family-of-Origin Dynamics to Understand Client Schema Dynamics. Contents note continued: Sibling Position and the Development of Schemas --
Early Childhood Recollections --
Collecting ECRs --
Clinically Working with a Client's Schema Dynamics --
Assimilation, Accommodation, and Green Eggs and Ham --
Linear Methods of Intervening with Client Schema: Facilitating Assimilation --
Assimilation and First-Order Change --
Nonlinear Methods of Intervening with Client Schema: Facilitating Accommodation --
Metaphor and Second-Order Change --
Putting the Pieces of the Client's Story Together: The Formulation and Case Conceptualization --
Conclusion --
Introduction: Good Will Hunting and Emotions --
But What Are Emotions? --
Lingering Misperceptions of Emotions --
Emotions Are, Weak, Feminine, and to Be Feared --
Catharsis of Emotion as Sufficient for Change --
Emotions Are to Be Avoided, Contained, and Neutralized in Treatment. Contents note continued: Understanding and Differentiating: Expressions of Affect, Internal Feelings, Emotional States and Moods, Primary Emotions, Secondary Emotions, and Background Emotions --
Expressions of Affect --
Internal Feelings --
Emotional States --
Primary Emotions --
Secondary Emotions --
Background Emotions or Mood --
Emotions, Mood, and Affect --
The Appraisal Process --
Primary Appraisals and Assessment of Threats and Benefits --
Secondary Appraisals and Responses to Threats --
Problem-Focused versus Emotion-Focused Coping --
The Relationship between Schema;, Appraisal, Emotions, and Behavior --
The Link between Common Negative Emotions and Psychological Disorders in Counseling --
The Continuum from Fear to Anxiety --
The Continuum from Sadness to Depression --
The Continuum from Anger to Chronic Impulsivity --
Conclusion --
Introduction --
Using Other Domains in Dealing with Clients' Emotions --
Listening and Responding. Contents note continued: The Therapeutic Relationship and Emotions --
Emotion-Focused Therapy Using the Relationship between Emotions and Schema Dynamics --
EFT-Therapeutically Working with Emotions: Coaching the Therapist's Approach to Working Successfully with Emotions --
EFT-Therapeutically Working with Emotions: Focusing to Foster Recognition and Reflection of Emotions --
EFT-Therapeutically Working with Emotions: Revelation, Reflecting, and Focusing --
Using Mindfulness to Help Clients Understand and Manage Emotions Therapeutically --
Definition of Mindfulness --
Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy-Basic Mindfulness and Getting Emotional Distance --
Using Elements of Acceptance and Commitment therapy to Therapeutically Work with Emotions --
Acceptance --
Cognitive Diffusion --
Contact with the Present Moment --
Observing the Self as Context --
Values --
Committed Action --
Using Elements of Dialectical Behavioral Therapy to Therapeutically Work with Emotions. Contents note continued: Mindfulness --
Distress Tolerance --
Emotion Regulation --
Interpersonal Effectiveness --
Conclusion --
Introduction: Odysseus's Dilemma --
Understanding Clinical Ambivalence --
Definition --
Types of Ambivalence --
What Ambivalent Rats Can Tell Us about Human Behavior? --
Linear and Nonlinear Views of Ambivalence --
Listening for and Recognizing Ambivalence --
Listening for Congruence --
Listening for Absence --
Listening for Inference --
Listening for Presence --
Listening for Resistance --
Stages of Change and Ambivalence --
What about the Therapeutic Relationship? --
Schema Dynamics and Ambivalence --
Emotions and Emotional Reactions --
Behavioral Manifestations of Ambivalence --
Flight into Illness and Flight into Health --
Secondary Gain --
Double Binds (Revisited) --
Take Aways for Practitioners --
Conclusion --
Answer to Buridan's Bridge --
Introduction: The Kobayashi Maru. Contents note continued: Linear Strategies and Interventions to Manage and Resolve Client Ambivalence --
Resolving Ambivalence: Holding a Mirror up to a Client --
Awareness, Ambivalence, and Effective Treatment --
Pacing, Reactance, and Nonlinear Thinking --
Nonlinear Approaches: Using Solution-Focused and Narrative Therapy Methods to Help Manage and Resolve Ambivalence --
The Miracle Question --
Scaling Questions --
Externalizing the Problem --
Nonlinear Approaches: Using Motivational Interviewing to Help Manage and Resolve Ambivalence --
OARS: Basic Motivational Interviewing Methods --
Using Reflection and Responses beyond Reflection to Address Ambivalence --
Rolling with the Resistance --
Developing Discrepancies --
Listening for and Eliciting Change Talk --
Successful Resolution of Ambivalence --
Take Aways for Practitioners --
Conclusion --
Nonlinear Thinking and the Domains of Competence Revisited --
So What Is the Point to All This? Contents note continued: The Disengagement/Engagement Hypothesis --
Disengagement through Linear and Nonlinear Understanding --
Disengagement Facilitated through the Therapeutic Relationship and Therapeutic Alliance --
Disengagement through Externalization of the Symptom --
Disengagement through Focusing Outward versus Focusing Inward --
Engagement, Nonlinear Thinking, and Second-Order Change: Effective Means and Effective Ends --
Engagement --
Definition of Engagement --
Encouraging Engagement through Specific Therapeutic Goals --
Making Progress Not Seeking Perfection --
Engagement through Affirmation and Reaffirmation of Assets and Resources --
Engagement through Mindfulness/Self-Encouragement/Self-Soothing --
The Final Secret: Deliberate Practice and Back to the Sorcerer's Apprentice.
Responsibility: Gerald J. Mozdzierz, Paul R. Peluso, and Joseph Lisiecki.

Abstract:

Research has shown that the most effective way to prepare students for practice with real clients is to learn to think in a new way rather than simply learning and using a set of steps. While there is much to be learned from what master practitioners do in their sessions, there is even more knowledge to gain from learning how they think. The second edition of Principles of Counseling and Psychotherapy offers students and practitioners a way to understand the processes behind effective outcomes with a wide variety of clients. The second edition is infused with real-world clinical case examples and opportunities for readers to apply the material to the cases being presented. New "thought-exercise" sections are specifically designed to engage the reader’s natural non-linear thinking, and transcript material both from cases and from master therapists themselves are interwoven in the text. -- ‡c From publisher's description.

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    schema:about <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/801197440#Topic/psychotherapy_education> ; # Psychotherapy--education
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    schema:bookEdition "Second edition." ;
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    schema:datePublished "2014" ;
    schema:description "Contents note continued: Boundary and Role Management I Boundaries -- Ethics and Boundaries -- Boundary and Role Management II Multiple Roles -- Flexibility of Boundaries -- Boundary and Role Management III Therapist Self-Disclosure -- Harm from Disclosure -- What Not to Do in a Therapeutic Relationship -- Conclusion -- Focus of Attention -- Decreased Level of Anxiety -- The Development of Understanding and Nonlinear Thinking -- Introduction: The Shawshank Schema -- What Are Schemas? Where Do They Come from? -- Three General Characteristics of Schemas -- A Historical Overview of Schemas in Therapy -- Schemas Help Guide Our Responses to New Experiences -- Personality Development and Core Schema Dynamics -- View of Self -- View of Self and Optimism -- View of Self and the Family of Origin -- View of Others -- View of Others: Positive or Negative -- View of Others and the Family of Origin -- View of the World and View of Life -- View of Life and the World, and Family of Origin."@en ;
    schema:description "Contents note continued: Advanced Linear responding -- Nonlinear Responding -- Nonlinear Responding to Incongruence (i.e., "I Hear-That There Is More Than One Side to This.") -- Nonlinear Responding to Absence (i.e., "I See What You Are Not Showing Me.") -- Nonlinear Responding to Presence (i.e., "I See What Your Body-Is Saying Even if You Don't.") -- Nonlinear Responding to Inference (i.e., "I Hear What You Are Not Saying.") -- Nonlinear Responding to Resistance (i.e., "I Understand That You Might Not Be Ready for This.") -- Conclusion -- Introduction: Every Story Must Have a Beginning, Middle, and an End -- Assessing the Client: Symptoms, Diagnoses, Strengths, and (Untapped) Resources -- Linear Methods of Assessment: Looking for Symptoms and Diagnoses -- The Goal of the Biopsychosocial Interview -- Linear Methods of Assessment: Looking for Strengths and Resources -- Nonlinear Methods of Assessing for Strengths and Resources -- Looking for Unused or Misused Power."@en ;
    schema:description "Contents note continued: The Therapeutic Relationship and Emotions -- Emotion-Focused Therapy Using the Relationship between Emotions and Schema Dynamics -- EFT-Therapeutically Working with Emotions: Coaching the Therapist's Approach to Working Successfully with Emotions -- EFT-Therapeutically Working with Emotions: Focusing to Foster Recognition and Reflection of Emotions -- EFT-Therapeutically Working with Emotions: Revelation, Reflecting, and Focusing -- Using Mindfulness to Help Clients Understand and Manage Emotions Therapeutically -- Definition of Mindfulness -- Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy-Basic Mindfulness and Getting Emotional Distance -- Using Elements of Acceptance and Commitment therapy to Therapeutically Work with Emotions -- Acceptance -- Cognitive Diffusion -- Contact with the Present Moment -- Observing the Self as Context -- Values -- Committed Action -- Using Elements of Dialectical Behavioral Therapy to Therapeutically Work with Emotions."@en ;
    schema:description "Contents note continued: Promising Elements of the Therapeutic Relationship (But Insufficient Research to Judge): Congruence/Genuineness -- Promising Elements of the Therapeutic Relationship (But Insufficient Research to Judge): Managing Transference and Countertransference -- Countertransference -- Promising Elements of the Therapeutic Relationship (But Insufficient Research to Judge): Ruptures to the Therapeutic Alliance -- Therapeutic Ruptures and Nonlinear Thinking -- Identifying Ruptures to the Therapeutic Alliance -- Repairing Ruptures to the Therapeutic Alliance -- Methods of Adapting the Therapeutic Relationship -- Demonstrably Effective Method of Adapting the Therapeutic Relationship: Reactance/Resistance -- Reactance -- Demonstrably Effective Method of Adapting the Therapeutic Relationship: Client Preference -- Demonstrably Effective Method of Adapting the Therapeutic Relationship: Culture/Religion/Spirituality -- Ethically Maintaining the Therapeutic Relationship."@en ;
    schema:description "Contents note continued: The Painful Truth: Effective Therapy Is Not Being Provided on a Consistent Basis -- Improving the Process of Learning How to Become an Effective Therapist: Proposed Solutions and Their Limitations -- The Movement toward Manualization or Evidence-Based Psychological Practices -- The Search for an Integrated Approach to Therapy -- Research and the Convergence of Understanding: Learning and Understanding the Seven Domains of Competence -- What Are Domains? -- What Domains Are Not -- Introducing the Seven Domains of Competence -- A Developmental Model of Therapist Growth: Guiding the Reader through the Learning Process to Help Speed Understanding of the Seven Domains of Competence and Nonlinear Thinking -- Stoltenberg's Developmental Model -- Integrating Stoltenberg's Developmental Model with the Seven Domains -- Conclusion -- Self-versus-Other Focus -- Anxiety -- The Quest for Perfection -- Insecurity -- Underdeveloped Sense of Clinical judgment."@en ;
    schema:description "Machine generated contents note: The Problem of the Sorcerer's Apprentice -- Learning from Experts-Those Who Demonstrate Their Effectiveness -- How Do Master Clinicians Achieve Mastery? -- Learning to Think Like a Therapist: The Characteristics of Expert Therapist Thinking and Why It Is Important -- Linear versus Nonlinear Thinking -- Nonlinear Thinking -- Clinical Case Example: A Broken Heart and Obsessing -- Am I a Nonlinear Thinker? -- Exercising Your Nonlinear Thinking -- Expertise and Learning How to Think Like a Practitioner -- How We Will Do It: Development of Mastery and Deliberate Practice -- So How Will We Do This? -- The Purpose of This Book -- The Current State of Psychotherapy -- Therapy Is Effective in Helping People with Mental Disorders, Adjustment Problems, and Relational Difficulties in Life -- Therapy Can Be Effective Quickly and Is a Cost-Effective Treatment -- Despite These Potential Benefits, Therapy Is Ineffective and Underutilized."@en ;
    schema:description "Contents note continued: Mindfulness -- Distress Tolerance -- Emotion Regulation -- Interpersonal Effectiveness -- Conclusion -- Introduction: Odysseus's Dilemma -- Understanding Clinical Ambivalence -- Definition -- Types of Ambivalence -- What Ambivalent Rats Can Tell Us about Human Behavior? -- Linear and Nonlinear Views of Ambivalence -- Listening for and Recognizing Ambivalence -- Listening for Congruence -- Listening for Absence -- Listening for Inference -- Listening for Presence -- Listening for Resistance -- Stages of Change and Ambivalence -- What about the Therapeutic Relationship? -- Schema Dynamics and Ambivalence -- Emotions and Emotional Reactions -- Behavioral Manifestations of Ambivalence -- Flight into Illness and Flight into Health -- Secondary Gain -- Double Binds (Revisited) -- Take Aways for Practitioners -- Conclusion -- Answer to Buridan's Bridge -- Introduction: The Kobayashi Maru."@en ;
    schema:description "Contents note continued: Sibling Position and the Development of Schemas -- Early Childhood Recollections -- Collecting ECRs -- Clinically Working with a Client's Schema Dynamics -- Assimilation, Accommodation, and Green Eggs and Ham -- Linear Methods of Intervening with Client Schema: Facilitating Assimilation -- Assimilation and First-Order Change -- Nonlinear Methods of Intervening with Client Schema: Facilitating Accommodation -- Metaphor and Second-Order Change -- Putting the Pieces of the Client's Story Together: The Formulation and Case Conceptualization -- Conclusion -- Introduction: Good Will Hunting and Emotions -- But What Are Emotions? -- Lingering Misperceptions of Emotions -- Emotions Are, Weak, Feminine, and to Be Feared -- Catharsis of Emotion as Sufficient for Change -- Emotions Are to Be Avoided, Contained, and Neutralized in Treatment."@en ;
    schema:description "Contents note continued: Conclusion -- Introduction: The King's Speech -- Research Findings: The Therapeutic Relationship and the Therapeutic Alliance -- Factors that Contribute to the Therapeutic Relationship -- Selected Findings of the First Task Force (2002) -- Selected Findings of the Second Task Force (2011) -- Demonstrably Effective Element of the Therapeutic Relationship: The Therapeutic Alliance -- Positive Affective Bond -- Therapeutic Tasks -- Consensus on Goals -- Research on the Therapeutic Alliance -- Conclusions on the Therapeutic Alliance -- Demonstrably Effective Element of the Therapeutic Relationship: Empathy -- Empathic Rapport -- Communicative Attunement -- Person Empathy -- Demonstrably Effective Elements of the Therapeutic Relationship: Collecting Client Feedback -- Probably Effective Elements of the Therapeutic Relationship: Positive Regard -- Conclusion -- Introduction."@en ;
    schema:description "Contents note continued: Where to Begin? -- Introduction: The Mob Boss Is Your Client -- Clinician Attitude and Disposition: Curiosity -- Listening -- How Do You Listen in a Linear Way? -- Listening for Content or Information -- Listening for Feelings -- How to Listen in a Nonlinear Way -- Congruence (i.e., Correspondence-or Lack of Correspondence-between What Is Said and What Is Meant) -- Listening for Absence (i.e., What Is Not Said-by Silence, Avoidance, or Information Overload) -- Listening for Presence (Nonverbal Behaviors That Add Meaning) -- Listening for Inference (The Purpose behind "I Don't Want ..." Statements) -- Listening for Resistance: The Desire Not to Change-, -- Our Nonlinear Brain: Mirror Neurons and Connecting with a Client -- Possible Meanings Associated with Statements in Clinical Exercise: Beginning the Use of Nonlinear Thinking -- Introduction -- Linear Responding -- Responding to Content or-Information -- Responding to Feelings."@en ;
    schema:description "Research has shown that the most effective way to prepare students for practice with real clients is to learn to think in a new way rather than simply learning and using a set of steps. While there is much to be learned from what master practitioners do in their sessions, there is even more knowledge to gain from learning how they think. The second edition of Principles of Counseling and Psychotherapy offers students and practitioners a way to understand the processes behind effective outcomes with a wide variety of clients. The second edition is infused with real-world clinical case examples and opportunities for readers to apply the material to the cases being presented. New "thought-exercise" sections are specifically designed to engage the reader’s natural non-linear thinking, and transcript material both from cases and from master therapists themselves are interwoven in the text. -- ‡c From publisher's description."@en ;
    schema:description "Contents note continued: Understanding and Differentiating: Expressions of Affect, Internal Feelings, Emotional States and Moods, Primary Emotions, Secondary Emotions, and Background Emotions -- Expressions of Affect -- Internal Feelings -- Emotional States -- Primary Emotions -- Secondary Emotions -- Background Emotions or Mood -- Emotions, Mood, and Affect -- The Appraisal Process -- Primary Appraisals and Assessment of Threats and Benefits -- Secondary Appraisals and Responses to Threats -- Problem-Focused versus Emotion-Focused Coping -- The Relationship between Schema;, Appraisal, Emotions, and Behavior -- The Link between Common Negative Emotions and Psychological Disorders in Counseling -- The Continuum from Fear to Anxiety -- The Continuum from Sadness to Depression -- The Continuum from Anger to Chronic Impulsivity -- Conclusion -- Introduction -- Using Other Domains in Dealing with Clients' Emotions -- Listening and Responding."@en ;
    schema:description "Contents note continued: Universal Characteristics of Schemas -- Conclusion -- Introduction -- Schema Dynamics and Cognitive Distortions -- Schema Dynamics, Cognitive Distortions, and Psychological Disorders -- Schema Dynamics and the Development of Personality Disorders -- Linear Thinking, Listening, and Responding to Core Client Schemas -- Nonlinear Thinking, Listening, and Responding to Core Client Schemas -- Rigid Schema Dynamics and Linear and Nonlinear Listening. Absolutes, Dichotomies, Extremes, Polarities, and Exclusionary Thinking -- Elements of Formal Assessment in Understanding a Client's Schema Dynamics -- Readiness for Change -- Client Resources -- Themes -- Client Goals -- Using the Therapeutic Relationship to Better Understand a Client's Schema Dynamics -- Therapeutic Alliance -- Therapeutic Ruptures and Client Schemas -- Utilizing Assessment of Client Schema Dynamics -- Using Family-of-Origin Dynamics to Understand Client Schema Dynamics."@en ;
    schema:description "Contents note continued: Connecting with Untapped Social Supports -- Assessing a Client's Readiness for Change: The Stages of Change Model -- Precontemplation -- Contemplation -- Preparation for Action -- Action -- Maintenance -- Relapse -- How to Identify a Client's Stage of Change -- Moving through the Stages of Change -- Conclusion -- Introduction -- Assessment: The Theme behind a Client's Narrative -- Theme of Desperation: "I Have a Problem That I Need to Work On!" -- Theme of Helplessness: The Symptom Is Out of Control ("I Can't Help Myself") -- Theme of Hopelessness: "I Have a Chronic Problem" -- Theme of Defensiveness: "Who or What Is the Problem? (Cause It's Not Me!)" -- Theme of Exhaustion: Being Overwhelmed (Physically, Emotionally, and/or Psychologically) -- Theme of Despair: The Experience of Loss -- Theme of Fear and Confusion: Double Binds -- Therapeutic Goals -- Making Good Therapeutic Goals -- Treatment Plans -- What Happens When Goals Don't Align?"@en ;
    schema:description "Contents note continued: The Disengagement/Engagement Hypothesis -- Disengagement through Linear and Nonlinear Understanding -- Disengagement Facilitated through the Therapeutic Relationship and Therapeutic Alliance -- Disengagement through Externalization of the Symptom -- Disengagement through Focusing Outward versus Focusing Inward -- Engagement, Nonlinear Thinking, and Second-Order Change: Effective Means and Effective Ends -- Engagement -- Definition of Engagement -- Encouraging Engagement through Specific Therapeutic Goals -- Making Progress Not Seeking Perfection -- Engagement through Affirmation and Reaffirmation of Assets and Resources -- Engagement through Mindfulness/Self-Encouragement/Self-Soothing -- The Final Secret: Deliberate Practice and Back to the Sorcerer's Apprentice."@en ;
    schema:description "Contents note continued: Linear Strategies and Interventions to Manage and Resolve Client Ambivalence -- Resolving Ambivalence: Holding a Mirror up to a Client -- Awareness, Ambivalence, and Effective Treatment -- Pacing, Reactance, and Nonlinear Thinking -- Nonlinear Approaches: Using Solution-Focused and Narrative Therapy Methods to Help Manage and Resolve Ambivalence -- The Miracle Question -- Scaling Questions -- Externalizing the Problem -- Nonlinear Approaches: Using Motivational Interviewing to Help Manage and Resolve Ambivalence -- OARS: Basic Motivational Interviewing Methods -- Using Reflection and Responses beyond Reflection to Address Ambivalence -- Rolling with the Resistance -- Developing Discrepancies -- Listening for and Eliciting Change Talk -- Successful Resolution of Ambivalence -- Take Aways for Practitioners -- Conclusion -- Nonlinear Thinking and the Domains of Competence Revisited -- So What Is the Point to All This?"@en ;
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