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Programming with Sets : an Introduction to SETL

Author: J T Schwartz; R B K Dewar; E Schonberg; E Dubinsky
Publisher: New York, NY : Springer US, 1986.
Series: Texts and monographs in computer science.
Edition/Format:   eBook : Bibliographic data : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
The programming language SETL is a relatively new member of the so-called "very-high-level" class of languages, some of whose other well-known mem­ bers are LISP, APL, SNOBOL, and PROLOG. These languages all aim to reduce the cost of programming, recognized today as a main obstacle to future progress in the computer field, by allowing direct manipulation of large composite objects, considerably more complex than the  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Electronic books
Additional Physical Format: Printed edition:
Material Type: Bibliographic data, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: J T Schwartz; R B K Dewar; E Schonberg; E Dubinsky
ISBN: 9781461395751 1461395755 9781461395775 1461395771
OCLC Number: 840283070
Reproduction Notes: Electronic reproduction. [Place of publication not identified] : HathiTrust Digital Library, 2010. MiAaHDL
Description: 1 online resource (XV, 493 pages 31 illustrations)
Details: Master and use copy. Digital master created according to Benchmark for Faithful Digital Reproductions of Monographs and Serials, Version 1. Digital Library Federation, December 2002.
Contents: 1 Programming Concepts --
1.1 An Informal Overview of SETL --
1.2 Advice to the Would-Be Programmer --
1.3 Programming Steps: How to Run Your Program and Read Its Results --
1.4 How to Type a Program: Character Sets --
1.5 Appendix: More on How to Read Your Output Listing --
2 Simple Data Types, Expressions, and Operations --
2.1 The Main Classes of Data Objects --
2.2 Simple Types and Their Constants --
2.3 Variable Identifiers --
2.4 Expressions and Statements --
2.5 Operations with Simple Data Types --
3 Compound Data Types and Operators --
3.1 Sets and Set Denotations --
3.2 Tuples --
3.3 Maps --
3.4 The Size of Composite Objects: The # Operator --
3.5 Set Operations and Set Formers --
3.6 Tuple Operations and Tuple Formers --
3.7 Tuple Formers; Simple Tuple and String Iterators --
3.8 Map Operations --
3.9 Compound Operators --
3.10 Types and Type-Testing Operators --
3.11 The? Operator --
3.12 General Form of the SETL Assignment: The Operators from, frome, and fromb --
3.13 Operator Precedence Rules --
3.14 Om and Errors --
4 Control Structures --
4.1 The if Statement --
4.2 The case Statement --
4.3 Loops --
4.4 The goto Statement --
4.5 The stop Statement --
4.6 The assert Statement --
4.7 Programming Examples --
4.8 Reading and Writing Data --
5 Procedures --
5.1 Writing and Using Procedures --
5.2 Name Scopes; Local and Global Variable Names: The var Declaration --
5.3 Programming Examples 177 5.3.1 The buckets and well problem: a simple artificial intelligence example --
5.4 Recursive Procedures --
5.5 Procedures that Modify Their Parameters --
5.6 Other Procedure-Related Facilities --
5.7 Rules of Style in the Use of Procedures --
5.8 String Scanning Primitives --
5.9 Use of Atoms --
6 Program Development, Testing, and Debugging --
6.1 Bugs: How to Minimize Them --
6.2 Finding Bugs --
6.3 A Checklist of Common Bugs --
6.4 Program Testing --
6.5 Analysis of Program Efficiency --
6.6 Formal Verification of Programs --
6.7 Formative Influences on Program Development --
6.8 References to Material on Alternative Data Structures: References for Additional Material on Algorithms --
7 Backtracking --
7.1 Backtracking --
8 Structuring Large SETL Programs --
8.1 The const Declaration --
8.2 Macros --
8.3 Programming Examples --
8.4 Programs, Modules, Libraries, and Directories: Structuring Constructs for Large SETL Programs --
9 Input/Output and Communication with the Environment --
9.1 Input-Output Facilities --
9.2 Use of Inclusion Libraries --
9.3 Listing-Control Commands --
9.4 Environment Operators and SETL Command Parameters --
10 The Data Representation Sublanguage --
10.0 Implementation of the SETL Primitives --
10.1 The Standard Representation for Tuples --
10.2 The Standard Representation for Sets --
10.3 Type Declarations --
10.4 Basing Declarations --
10.5 Base Sets Consisting of Atoms Only --
10.6 Constant Bases --
10.7 The Packed Representations --
10.8 Guidelines for the Effective Use of the Data Representation Sublanguage --
11 The Language in Action: A Gallery of Programming Examples --
11.1 Eulerian Paths in a Graph --
11.2 Topological Sorting --
11.3 The Stable Assignment Problem --
11.4 A Text Preparation Program --
11.5 A Simplified Financial Record-Keeping System --
11.6 A Turing-Machine Simulator --
11.7 Huffman Coding of Text Files --
11.8 A Game-Playing Program --
11.9 Implementation of a Macroprocessor --
Appendix A SETL Reserved Words --
Appendix B Syntax Diagrams --
B.1 Lexical Structure --
B.2 Program Structure --
B.3 Declarative Forms --
B.4 Statement Forms --
B.5 Expressions.
Series Title: Texts and monographs in computer science.
Responsibility: by J.T. Schwartz, R.B.K. Dewar, E. Schonberg, E. Dubinsky.

Abstract:

The programming language SETL is a relatively new member of the so-called "very-high-level" class of languages, some of whose other well-known mem bers are LISP, APL, SNOBOL, and PROLOG.  Read more...

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