Project-based writing : teaching writers to manage time and clarify purpose (Book, 2017) [WorldCat.org]
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Project-based writing : teaching writers to manage time and clarify purpose

Author: Liz Prather
Publisher: Portsmouth, NH : Heinemann, [2017]
Edition/Format:   Print book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
The idea that students should be "college and career ready" when they leave high school has become a major focus in education, but much of this conversation has been on reading readiness. What about writing readiness? Liz Prather argues that we can set students up for future success when we help them learn to care about what they're writing, and help them manage their time to write. "I needed a framework for  Read more...
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Details

Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Liz Prather
ISBN: 9780325089805 0325089809
OCLC Number: 994637339
Description: xiv, 208 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
Contents: Machine generated contents note: ch. One The Journey to Project-Based Writing --
Writing as an Individual Process --
Cute, Single Writing Process Seeks Robust Project Management Framework --
How to Use This Book --
A New Paradigm --
ch. Two An Overview for Project-Based Writing: A Framework in Seven Steps --
Discovering an Idea --
Framing the Work --
Planning the Work --
Doing the Work --
Refraining the Work --
Finalizing the Work --
Revealing the Work --
A Word About Failure and the Evolution of Writing --
Recognizing Student Exigencies --
ch. Three On Community: The Key to Building a Project-Based Writing Classroom --
Start with Story --
Embrace Transparency --
Champion the Uniqueness of Your Approach --
Establish a Happy Communal Space --
Root Yourself as Part of the Community --
Launch a Shared Narrative Space --
A Final Word on Community --
ch. Four Discovering an Idea: The First Step of Project-Based Writing --
Cultivate a Practice of Noticing Note continued: Cultivate a Practice of Writing --
Ten Tools for Generating Ideas --
Just Pick One Already --
ch. Five Framing the Work: Developing a Pitch and Proposal --
How Do Students Pitch? --
How Do Students Write a Proposal? --
ch. Six Planning the Work: Product Goals and Project Scheduling --
How Do Students Create Product-Specific Goals? --
How Do Students Create a Project Schedule? --
How Does Planning Lead to Self-Discovery? --
ch. Seven Doing the Work: Individual Studio Time, Project Conference, and Project Library --
What Is Individual Studio Time? --
How Do Students Set Up a Project Library? --
How Do You Conference with Students About Projects? --
A Final Word on Dedicated Writing Time --
ch. Eight Reframing the Work: Inquiry Draft, Inquiry Questions, Annotations, and Say-Back Sessions --
Inquiry Week: An Overview --
Creating Good Inquiry Questions --
How to Read, Annotate, and Respond to an Inquiry Draft --
What Are Say-Back Sessions? Note continued: Sarah's Say-Back Session: An Example --
Weighing Say-Back Data --
ch. Nine Finalizing the Work: Final Draft, Project Reflection, and Individual Evaluation Form --
What Matters as Students Revise the Final Product? --
How Do Students Compose the Project Reflection? --
How Do Students Create the Individual Evaluation Form? --
How Does a Final Evaluation Support Failure? --
ch. Ten Revealing the Work: Community Score and 4P --
How Do Students Evaluate Each Other's Projects in Community Score? --
How Do Students Go Public with Their Projects? --
ch. Eleven The Big Picture: Terms, Practices, Structures, Standards, and Grading --
Four Project-Based Writing Terms: Process, Product, Project, and Practice --
Project-Based Infrastructure: Four Perennial Practices --
Project-Based Structure: The Seven Steps --
Standards and Grading --
On Mastery and Failure.
Responsibility: Liz Prather ; foreword by Cris Tovani.

Abstract:

The idea that students should be "college and career ready" when they leave high school has become a major focus in education, but much of this conversation has been on reading readiness. What about writing readiness? Liz Prather argues that we can set students up for future success when we help them learn to care about what they're writing, and help them manage their time to write. "I needed a framework for teaching writing that would keep my students accountable and engaged," Liz explains, "but would allow them to write from their own passions, and instill in them an understanding of time management, goal setting, and production. By adding the tenets and practices of project-based learning, I could simultaneously protect the creative processes of my students while helping them learn to manage long term writing projects, the kind of projects they would be doing in college or in a career." Project-Based Writing provides a 7 step structure to conceive, manage, and deliver writing projects built upon student voice and student choice. Liz includes classroom-tested strategies for helping kids persevere through roadblocks, changes in direction, failed attempts, and most importantly, "anticipate the tricks of that wily saboteur, Time." Both practical and inspirational, Project-Based Writing teaches kids the real-world lessons they need to become real-world writers.

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