Q in Matthew : ancient media, memory, and early scribal transmission of the Jesus tradition (eBook, 2016) [WorldCat.org]
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Q in Matthew : ancient media, memory, and early scribal transmission of the Jesus tradition

Author: Alan Kirk
Publisher: New York : Bloomsbury T & T Clark, 2016.
Series: Library of New Testament studies, 564.
Edition/Format:   eBook : Document : English
Summary:
Advocates of the established hypotheses on the origins of the Synoptic gospels and their interrelationships (the Synoptic Problem), and especially those defending or contesting the existence of the "source" (Q), are increasingly being called upon to justify their position with reference to ancient media practices. Still others go so far as to claim that ancient media realities force a radical rethinking of the whole  Read more...
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Details

Material Type: Document, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: Alan Kirk
ISBN: 9780567667731 0567667731
OCLC Number: 1286757210
Description: 1 online resource (1 recurso electrónico.).
Contents: Orality, writing, and media interface in antiquity --
Source utilization practices and ancient media: in search of a model --
Manuscript and memory --
The 2DH's inconvenient problem: Matthew's Q utilization --
Source-utilization in the Sermon on the Mount --
Q and Matthew's Markan transpositions --
Q in Matthew: what difference does it make?
Series Title: Library of New Testament studies, 564.
Responsibility: by Alan Kirk.

Abstract:

Advocates of the established hypotheses on the origins of the Synoptic gospels and their interrelationships (the Synoptic Problem), and especially those defending or contesting the existence of the "source" (Q), are increasingly being called upon to justify their position with reference to ancient media practices. Still others go so far as to claim that ancient media realities force a radical rethinking of the whole project of Synoptic source criticism, and they question whether traditional documentary approaches remain valid at all. This debate has been hampered to date by the patchy reception of research on ancient media in Synoptic scholarship. Seeking to rectify this problem, Alan Kirk here mounts a defense, grounded in the practices of memory and manuscript transmission in the Roman world, of the Two Document Hypothesis. He shows how ancient media/memory approaches in fact offer new leverage on classic research problems in scholarship on the Synoptic Gospels, and that they have the potential to break the current impasse in the Synoptic Problem. The results of his analysis open up new insights to the early reception and scribal transmission of the Jesus tradition and cast new light on some long-conflicted questions in Christian origins.

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