The queen of heaven and a goddess for all the people : kingship, religion, and cultural evolution between Greece and the Near East, 3000-500 BCE (Book, 2016) [WorldCat.org]
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The queen of heaven and a goddess for all the people : kingship, religion, and cultural evolution between Greece and the Near East, 3000-500 BCE

Author: Megan Johanna DanielsIan MorrisCarolina López-RuizRichard MartinJosiah OberAll authors
Publisher: 2016.
Dissertation: Ph. D. Stanford University 2016
Edition/Format:   Thesis/dissertation : Document : Thesis/dissertation : eBook   Computer File : English
Summary:
This dissertation traces the evolution of the ideologies of divine kingship within the cultural groups of western Asia and the eastern Mediterranean across the Bronze and Iron Ages through textual and material sources concerning the worship of the Queen of Heaven. Using a range of case studies from the Bronze and Iron Ages to understand the shifting meanings of this deity and her relation to earthly kingship, I  Read more...
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Details

Genre/Form: Academic theses
Material Type: Document, Thesis/dissertation, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: Megan Johanna Daniels; Ian Morris; Carolina López-Ruiz; Richard Martin; Josiah Ober; Stanford University. Department of Classics.
OCLC Number: 953631233
Notes: Submitted to the Department of Classics.
Description: 1 online resource
Responsibility: Megan Johanna Daniels.

Abstract:

This dissertation traces the evolution of the ideologies of divine kingship within the cultural groups of western Asia and the eastern Mediterranean across the Bronze and Iron Ages through textual and material sources concerning the worship of the Queen of Heaven. Using a range of case studies from the Bronze and Iron Ages to understand the shifting meanings of this deity and her relation to earthly kingship, I argue that the Iron Age Greeks, even as they experimented with novel egalitarian forms of rule, engaged with and transformed discourses of divine kingship through mythical and ritual practices that critiqued and reoriented human beings' relationships with the gods. The major aim of this study is to develop a comprehensive historical perspective on Greece and its cultural, social, and political relations with cultural groups to the east through the shared ritual language surrounding divine kingship. To this end, along with my case studies, I consider theories of cultural evolution of religion, and in particular religion's role in the cultural and cognitive shifts that heralded the axial age, to understand the trajectories and meanings of these shifting relationships, between Greece and the Near East, king and society, and humans and their gods.

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