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Radical enlightenment : philosophy and the making of modernity 1650-1750

Author: Jonathan I Israel
Publisher: Oxford : Oxford University Press, 2003
Edition/Format:   Print book : English : ReprintView all editions and formats
Summary:
Arguably the most decisive shift in the history of ideas in modern times was the complete demolition during the late seventeenth and eighteenth centuries - in the wake of the Scientific Revolution - of traditional structures of authority, scientific thought, and belief, by the new philosophy and the philosophies, culminating in Voltaire, Diderot, and Rousseau. In this revolutionary process which effectively  Read more...
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Named Person: Benedictus de Spinoza
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Jonathan I Israel
ISBN: 0198206089 9780198206088 0199254567 9780199254569
OCLC Number: 862098259
Notes: Originally published: 2001
Preface. Acknowledgements. List of plates. List of figures. List of map and tables. Abbreviations of library and archive locations. PART I. The 'radical enlightenment'. 1. Introduction. 2. Government and philosophy. 3. Society, institutions, revolution. 4. Women, philosophy, and sexuality. 5. Censorship and culture. 6. Libraries and enlightenment. 7. The learned journals. PART II. The rise of philosophical radicalism. 8. Spinoza. 9. Van den Enden : philosophy, democracy, and egalitarianism. 10. Radicalism and the people : the brothers Koerbagh. 11. Philosophy, the interpreter of scripture. 12. Miracles denied. 13. Spinoza's system. 14. Spinoza, science, and the scientists. 15. Philosophy, politics, and the liberation of man. 16. Publishing a banned philosophy. 17. The spread of a forbidden movement. PART III. Europe and the 'new' intellectual controversies 1680-1720. 18. Bayle and the 'virtuous atheist'. 19. The Bredenburg disputes. 20. Fontenelle and the war of the oracles. 21. The death of the devil. 22. Leenhof and the 'universal philosophical religion'. 23. The 'nature of God' controversy. PART IV. The intellectual counter-offensive. 24. New theological strategies. 25. The collapse of Cartesianism. 26. Leibniz and the radical enlightenment. 27. Anglomania : the 'triumph' of Newton and Locke. 28. The intellectual drama in Spain and Portugal. 29. Germany and the Baltic : the 'war of the philosophers'. PART V. The clandestine progress of the radical enlightenment (1680-1750). 30. Boulainvilliers and the rise of French deism. 31. French refugee deists in exile. 32. The Spinozistic novel in French. 33. English deism and Europe. 34. Germany : the radical Aufklärung. 35. The radical impact in Italy. 36. The clandestine philosophical manuscripts. 37. From La Mettrie to Diderot. 38. Epilogue : Rousseau, radicalism, revolution. Bibliography. Index
Description: xvi, 810 s. : illustrations, kort ; 24 cm
Contents: Preface --
Acknowledgements --
List of plates --
List of figures --
List of map and tables --
Abbreviations of library and archive locations --
PART I. The 'radical enlightenment'. 1. Introduction --
2. Government and philosophy --
3. Society, institutions, revolution --
4. Women, philosophy, and sexuality --
5. Censorship and culture --
6. Libraries and enlightenment --
7. The learned journals --
PART II. The rise of philosophical radicalism --
8. Spinoza --
9. Van den Enden : philosophy, democracy, and egalitarianism --
10. Radicalism and the people : the brothers Koerbagh --
11. Philosophy, the interpreter of scripture --
12. Miracles denied --
13. Spinoza's system --
14. Spinoza, science, and the scientists --
15. Philosophy, politics, and the liberation of man --
16. Publishing a banned philosophy --
17. The spread of a forbidden movement --
PART III. Europe and the 'new' intellectual controversies 1680-1720. 18. Bayle and the 'virtuous atheist'. 19. The Bredenburg disputes --
20. Fontenelle and the war of the oracles --
21. The death of the devil --
22. Leenhof and the 'universal philosophical religion'. 23. The 'nature of God' controversy --
PART IV. The intellectual counter-offensive --
24. New theological strategies --
25. The collapse of Cartesianism --
26. Leibniz and the radical enlightenment --
27. Anglomania : the 'triumph' of Newton and Locke --
28. The intellectual drama in Spain and Portugal --
29. Germany and the Baltic : the 'war of the philosophers'. PART V. The clandestine progress of the radical enlightenment (1680-1750). 30. Boulainvilliers and the rise of French deism --
31. French refugee deists in exile --
32. The Spinozistic novel in French --
33. English deism and Europe --
34. Germany : the radical Aufklärung --
35. The radical impact in Italy --
36. The clandestine philosophical manuscripts --
37. From La Mettrie to Diderot --
38. Epilogue : Rousseau, radicalism, revolution --
Bibliography --
Index.
Responsibility: Jonathan I. Israel

Abstract:

Arguably the most decisive shift in the history of ideas in modern times was the complete demolition during the late seventeenth and eighteenth centuries - in the wake of the Scientific Revolution - of traditional structures of authority, scientific thought, and belief, by the new philosophy and the philosophies, culminating in Voltaire, Diderot, and Rousseau. In this revolutionary process which effectively overthrew all justification for monarchy, aristocracy, slavery, and ecclesiastical authority, as well as man's asendancy over woman and theology's domination over education and study, substituting the modern principles of equality, democracy, and universality, the Radical Enlightenment played a crucially important part. Despite the present-day interest in the revolutions of the late eighteenth century, the origins and rise of the Radical Enlightenment have been astonishingly little studied, doubtless largely because if its very wide international sweep and the obvious difficulties of fitting it into the restrictive conventions of 'national history' which until recently tended to dominate all historiography. The greatest obstacle to the Radical Enlightenment finding its proper place in modern historical writing is simply that it was not French, British, German, Italian, Jewish or Dutch, but all of these at the same time. In this novel interpretation of the Radical Enlightenment down to La Mettrie and Diderot, two of its key exponents, particular stress is placed on the pivotal role of Spinoza and the widespread underground international philosophical movement known before 1750 as Spinozism

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<http:\/\/www.worldcat.org\/oclc\/862098259<\/a>> # Radical enlightenment : philosophy and the making of modernity 1650-1750<\/span>\n\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0a \nschema:CreativeWork<\/a>, schema:Book<\/a> ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nlibrary:oclcnum<\/a> \"862098259<\/span>\" ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nlibrary:placeOfPublication<\/a> <http:\/\/id.loc.gov\/vocabulary\/countries\/uik<\/a>> ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nlibrary:placeOfPublication<\/a> <http:\/\/experiment.worldcat.org\/entity\/work\/data\/4915806768#Place\/oxford<\/a>> ; # Oxford<\/span>\n\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:about<\/a> <http:\/\/experiment.worldcat.org\/entity\/work\/data\/4915806768#Place\/europa<\/a>> ; # Europa.<\/span>\n\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:about<\/a> <http:\/\/experiment.worldcat.org\/entity\/work\/data\/4915806768#Topic\/philosophy_european<\/a>> ; # Philosophy, European<\/span>\n\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:about<\/a> <http:\/\/experiment.worldcat.org\/entity\/work\/data\/4915806768#Topic\/philosophie_europeenne<\/a>> ; # Philosophie europ\u00E9enne<\/span>\n\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:about<\/a> <http:\/\/viaf.org\/viaf\/22149024<\/a>> ; # Benedictus de Spinoza<\/span>\n\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:about<\/a> <http:\/\/id.loc.gov\/authorities\/subjects\/sh2008119708<\/a>> ; # Enlightenment--Europe<\/span>\n\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:about<\/a> <http:\/\/id.worldcat.org\/fast\/1245064<\/a>> ; # Europe<\/span>\n\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:about<\/a> <http:\/\/experiment.worldcat.org\/entity\/work\/data\/4915806768#Topic\/philosophie<\/a>> ; # Philosophie<\/span>\n\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:about<\/a> <http:\/\/experiment.worldcat.org\/entity\/work\/data\/4915806768#Topic\/enlightenment<\/a>> ; # Enlightenment<\/span>\n\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:about<\/a> <http:\/\/experiment.worldcat.org\/entity\/work\/data\/4915806768#Organization\/de<\/a>> ; # De<\/span>\n\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:about<\/a> <http:\/\/dewey.info\/class\/940.25\/e21\/<\/a>> ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:about<\/a> <http:\/\/experiment.worldcat.org\/entity\/work\/data\/4915806768#Topic\/siecle_des_lumieres_europe<\/a>> ; # Si\u00E8cle des lumi\u00E8res--Europe<\/span>\n\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:about<\/a> <http:\/\/experiment.worldcat.org\/entity\/work\/data\/4915806768#Topic\/aufklarung<\/a>> ; # Aufkl\u00E4rung<\/span>\n\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:about<\/a> <http:\/\/id.loc.gov\/authorities\/subjects\/sh86001772<\/a>> ; # Philosophy, European<\/span>\n\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:about<\/a> <http:\/\/id.loc.gov\/authorities\/classification\/B802<\/a>> ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:bookEdition<\/a> \"Reprint.<\/span>\" ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:bookFormat<\/a> bgn:PrintBook<\/a> ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:contributor<\/a> <http:\/\/viaf.org\/viaf\/100908195<\/a>> ; # Israel Jonathan Irvine Israel<\/span>\n\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:datePublished<\/a> \"2003<\/span>\" ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:description<\/a> \"Arguably the most decisive shift in the history of ideas in modern times was the complete demolition during the late seventeenth and eighteenth centuries - in the wake of the Scientific Revolution - of traditional structures of authority, scientific thought, and belief, by the new philosophy and the philosophies, culminating in Voltaire, Diderot, and Rousseau. In this revolutionary process which effectively overthrew all justification for monarchy, aristocracy, slavery, and ecclesiastical authority, as well as man\'s asendancy over woman and theology\'s domination over education and study, substituting the modern principles of equality, democracy, and universality, the Radical Enlightenment played a crucially important part. Despite the present-day interest in the revolutions of the late eighteenth century, the origins and rise of the Radical Enlightenment have been astonishingly little studied, doubtless largely because if its very wide international sweep and the obvious difficulties of fitting it into the restrictive conventions of \'national history\' which until recently tended to dominate all historiography. The greatest obstacle to the Radical Enlightenment finding its proper place in modern historical writing is simply that it was not French, British, German, Italian, Jewish or Dutch, but all of these at the same time. In this novel interpretation of the Radical Enlightenment down to La Mettrie and Diderot, two of its key exponents, particular stress is placed on the pivotal role of Spinoza and the widespread underground international philosophical movement known before 1750 as Spinozism<\/span>\" ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:description<\/a> \"Preface -- Acknowledgements -- List of plates -- List of figures -- List of map and tables -- Abbreviations of library and archive locations -- PART I. The \'radical enlightenment\'. 1. Introduction -- 2. Government and philosophy -- 3. Society, institutions, revolution -- 4. Women, philosophy, and sexuality -- 5. Censorship and culture -- 6. Libraries and enlightenment -- 7. The learned journals -- PART II. The rise of philosophical radicalism -- 8. Spinoza -- 9. Van den Enden : philosophy, democracy, and egalitarianism -- 10. Radicalism and the people : the brothers Koerbagh -- 11. Philosophy, the interpreter of scripture -- 12. Miracles denied -- 13. Spinoza\'s system -- 14. Spinoza, science, and the scientists -- 15. Philosophy, politics, and the liberation of man -- 16. Publishing a banned philosophy -- 17. The spread of a forbidden movement -- PART III. Europe and the \'new\' intellectual controversies 1680-1720. 18. Bayle and the \'virtuous atheist\'. 19. The Bredenburg disputes -- 20. Fontenelle and the war of the oracles -- 21. The death of the devil -- 22. Leenhof and the \'universal philosophical religion\'. 23. The \'nature of God\' controversy -- PART IV. The intellectual counter-offensive -- 24. New theological strategies -- 25. The collapse of Cartesianism -- 26. Leibniz and the radical enlightenment -- 27. Anglomania : the \'triumph\' of Newton and Locke -- 28. The intellectual drama in Spain and Portugal -- 29. Germany and the Baltic : the \'war of the philosophers\'. PART V. The clandestine progress of the radical enlightenment (1680-1750). 30. Boulainvilliers and the rise of French deism -- 31. French refugee deists in exile -- 32. The Spinozistic novel in French -- 33. English deism and Europe -- 34. Germany : the radical Aufkl\u00E4rung -- 35. The radical impact in Italy -- 36. The clandestine philosophical manuscripts -- 37. From La Mettrie to Diderot -- 38. 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