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Ranging behaviour and foraging habitats of breeding Sparrowhawks Accipiter nisus in a continuous forested area in Norway
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Ranging behaviour and foraging habitats of breeding Sparrowhawks Accipiter nisus in a continuous forested area in Norway

Author: Vidar Selås Affiliation: Department of Biology and Nature Conservation, Agricultural University of Norway, PO Box 5014, N-1432 Ås, Norway; Trond Rafoss Affiliation: Department of Biology and Nature Conservation, Agricultural University of Norway, PO Box 5014, N-1432 Ås, Norway
Edition/Format: Article Article : English
Publication:Ibis, v141 n2 (April 1999): 269-276
Summary:
The ranging behaviour and foraging habitats of Sparrowhawks Accipiter nisus were studied in a continuous forest area in southern Norway by use of radiotelemetry in 1995 and 1996. The mean size of the home ranges was 9.2 km² for males (sd ± 3.7, n= 6) and 12.3 km² for females (sd ± 6.4, n= 6), but the difference was not significant. Females ranged farther away from nests (mean 1824 m) than did males (mean 1240 m). None of the Sparrowhawks were located outside forest habitats. For the three pairs where both mates were radiotracked in 1996, habitat use did not differ between the sexes. Habitat composition in the home ranges differed from that of the study area. The most important difference was a higher proportion of medium-aged forest and a lower proportion of old forest in home ranges than in the study area. The selection for medium-aged forests was probably a response to high food supply and good hunting opportunities. Mixed regeneration and old forests were used more than clear-fell areas, which were seldom used. Mixed regeneration was also used more than coniferous replanting. The large home ranges in this study compared with those in studies in Great Britain is probably due to lower land productivity and associated lower densities of prey species in the present study. The study indicates that the Sparrowhawk benefits from modern forestry, which has created an increased proportion of medium-aged stands in the forest landscape.  Read more...
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Details

Document Type: Article
All Authors / Contributors: Vidar Selås Affiliation: Department of Biology and Nature Conservation, Agricultural University of Norway, PO Box 5014, N-1432 Ås, Norway; Trond Rafoss Affiliation: Department of Biology and Nature Conservation, Agricultural University of Norway, PO Box 5014, N-1432 Ås, Norway
ISSN:0019-1019
Language Note: English
Unique Identifier: 5157014496
Notes: *Corresponding author. Email: vidar.selas@ibn.nlh.no
7 December 1997
Number of References: 39
Awards:

Abstract:

The ranging behaviour and foraging habitats of Sparrowhawks Accipiter nisus were studied in a continuous forest area in southern Norway by use of radiotelemetry in 1995 and 1996. The mean size of the home ranges was 9.2 km² for males (sd ± 3.7, n= 6) and 12.3 km² for females (sd ± 6.4, n= 6), but the difference was not significant. Females ranged farther away from nests (mean 1824 m) than did males (mean 1240 m). None of the Sparrowhawks were located outside forest habitats. For the three pairs where both mates were radiotracked in 1996, habitat use did not differ between the sexes. Habitat composition in the home ranges differed from that of the study area. The most important difference was a higher proportion of medium-aged forest and a lower proportion of old forest in home ranges than in the study area. The selection for medium-aged forests was probably a response to high food supply and good hunting opportunities. Mixed regeneration and old forests were used more than clear-fell areas, which were seldom used. Mixed regeneration was also used more than coniferous replanting. The large home ranges in this study compared with those in studies in Great Britain is probably due to lower land productivity and associated lower densities of prey species in the present study. The study indicates that the Sparrowhawk benefits from modern forestry, which has created an increased proportion of medium-aged stands in the forest landscape.

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