Reading essays : an invitation (Book, 2008) [WorldCat.org]
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Reading essays : an invitation
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Reading essays : an invitation

Author: G Douglas Atkins
Publisher: Athens : University of Georgia Press, 2008.
Edition/Format:   Print book : State or province government publication : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
This book provides helpful guidance on how to read an essay, from a noted scholar and practitioner of the form. Approaches abound to help us beneficially, enjoyably read fiction, poetry, and drama. Here is a book that aims to do the same for the essay. G. Douglas Atkins performs sustained readings of more than twenty-five major essays, explaining how we can appreciate and understand what this currently resurgent  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Lectures et morceaux choisis (Enseignement supérieur)
Material Type: Government publication, State or province government publication, Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: G Douglas Atkins
ISBN: 9780820328263 082032826X 9780820330303 0820330302
OCLC Number: 153598705
Description: xvii, 276 pages ; 24 cm
Contents: Essaying to be: on reading (and writing) essays --
The advent of personality and the beginning of the essay: Montaigne and Bacon --
"The passionate discourse of an amateur": John Dryden's prose and poetic essays --
With wit enough to manage judgment: Alexander Pope's An essay on criticism --
It's not an essay: Jonathan Swift's ''A modest proposal" and the immodesty of satire --
Turning inside out: Samuel Johnson's "The solitude of the country" --
An allegory of essaying? Process and product in William Hazlitt's "On going a journey" --
The risk of not being: Ralph Waldo Emerson's "Illusions" --
Forging in the smithy of the mind: Henry David Thoreau's "Walking" and the problematic of transcendence --
Estranging the familiar: Alice Meynell's "Solitudes" --
"By indirections find directions out": Hilaire Belloc's "The mowing of a field" --
Essaying and the strain of incarnational thinking: G.K. Chesterton's "A piece of chalk" --
Homage to the common reader: or how should one read Virginia Woolf's "The death of the moth"? --
The turning of the essay: T.S. Eliot's "Tradition and the individual talent" --
A site to behold: Richard Selzer's" A worm from my notebook" --
The discarnate word: Scott Russell Sanders's "Silence" --
"Love came to us incarnate": Annie Dillard's "God in the doorway" --
"A free intelligence": George Orwell, the essay, and "Reflections on Gandhi" --
Where "trifles rule like tyrants": Cynthia Ozick's "The seam of the snail" --
Essaying and pen passion: Anne Fadiman as common reader in "Eternal ink" --
Acts of simplifying: sense and sentences in Sam Pickering's "Composing a life" --
Caged lions and sustained sibilants: E.B. White as "recording secretary" in "The ring of time" --
Her oyster knife sharpened: control of tone in Zora Neale Hurston's "How it feels to be colored me" --
The basic ingredient: candor and compassion in Nancy Mairs's "On being a cripple" --
The work of the sympathetic imagination: James Baldwin's "Notes of a native son" --
"On a line between two sturdy poles": Edward Hoagland's "What I think, what I am" --
A note on writing the essay: the issue of process versus product (with an essay by Cara McConnell).
Responsibility: G. Douglas Atkins.
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Abstract:

Contains readings of more than twenty-five major essays, explaining how we can appreciate and understand what this literary form reveals about the ""art of living."" This book offers advice on the  Read more...

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