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Readings on productivity in policing

Author: John A Grimes; Joan L Wolfle; John F Heaphy
Publisher: Washington : Police Foundation, [1975]
Edition/Format:   Print book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
Paper by Edward K. Hamilton: It is asserted that basic changes in the politics and economics of many American cities have affected the value city administrators and police leadership attach to determining and reporting police productivity measures. The author discusses the difficulty inherent in trying to link input productivity - optimal use of resources with respect to a stated list of police activities - with
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Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Readings on productivity in policing.
Washington : Police Foundation, [1975]
(OCoLC)551311687
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: John A Grimes; Joan L Wolfle; John F Heaphy
OCLC Number: 1529194
Description: v, 149 pages ; 22 cm
Contents: Foreword / Ivan Allen, Jr. --
Acknowledgements / Joan L. Wolfle, John F. Heaphy --
Productivity : a national concern / George H. Kuper --
Police productivity : the view from city hall / Edward K. Hamilton --
Police accountability / Patrick V. Murphy --
The police, the union, and the productivity imperative / John A. Grimes --
Wrestling with police crime control productivity measurement / Harry P. Hatry --
Planning and implementing a productivity program / James P. Morgan, Jr.
Responsibility: contributing authors, John A. Grimes [and others] ; edited by Joan L. Wolfle, John F. Heaphy.

Abstract:

Paper by Edward K. Hamilton: It is asserted that basic changes in the politics and economics of many American cities have affected the value city administrators and police leadership attach to determining and reporting police productivity measures. The author discusses the difficulty inherent in trying to link input productivity - optimal use of resources with respect to a stated list of police activities - with output productivity - the providing of adequate services and crime control. Numerous factors, largely political in character, which are said to have changed the perspectives of many mayors and city managers during the last 10 years are explored. The author speculates on prospects for the next decade, in which he feels it likely that the preoccupation with police productivity will either stimulate introduction of important new management tools, or that it will collapse in a wave of public and professional disillusionment.--Paper by Patrick V. Murphy: The author states that budgetary considerations will cause police administrators to be held increasingly accountable for their use of resources. Several factors, such as the difficulty inherent in attempts to define police responsibilities and the insular attitude of police departments toward each other, are said to have so far deferred such accountability. Industry's attempts at profit maximization through concentration on productivity measurement and improvement are said to present potentially valuable examples. Suggested areas for concentration include the defining of officers' responsibilities, increased interagency and interdepartmental cooperation, and coordination with lawmakers and public officials of enforcement policies.--Paper by John A. Grimes: Intended for officials involved in police productivity efforts, this paper describes police employee organizations - their goals, their perceptions of their role in management, and their attitudes on productivity. The history and development of police employee organizations is reviewed, and several of the prominent organizations are described. Police unions, and in particular local police employees associations, are examined, and the processes of interaction with police management are described. Because productivity programs require management/union cooperation, it is important that efficient mechanisms for communication and negotiation be maintained. Examples are presented of how several departments have approached this task. A number of case studies of productivity programs are included. The author concludes that productivity maximization is and will remain an imperative, as will the need for unions and management to reach mutually acceptable policies for achieving it.--Paper by Harry P. Hatry: This report discusses a number of alternatives that have been proposed to improve police crime control productivity measurement. The problem of defining units of output to be measured is discussed, and some specific productivity measurements are illustrated. Problems often encountered with existing measures - crime prevention and deterrence measures, arrest rates, citizen feedback measures, and workload oriented measures - and ways of circumventing those problems pre discussed. Input measures and related difficulties of quantification are examined. It is said that measurement of the productivity of individual police officers should be used only as an internal management tool for constructive improvements. Suggestions are made for the interpretation of productivity data. Methods include comparisons of past and current performance, comparison of the performance of similar departments and units, and comparison of actual with projected performance.

Paper by James P. Morgan, Jr.: A method is described by which police administrators can implement a program of productivity measurement and improvement. The creation of a productivity management unit, headed by a productivity analyst, is suggested. Primary areas of concentration are operations that consume large numbers of manhours or involve large numbers of employees who perform routine and repetitive tasks. Areas where unit costs are high and functions that normally result in backlogs of work. Several general rules for setting productivity objectives are given. Productivity measures must then be chosen, and baseline data accumulated. Methods of monitoring projects in productivity programs are discussed. Case study examples are provided for each of these steps. Common obstacles, and methods of avoidance, are described. The importance of approaching productivity programs in such a way that individual officers do not perceive their own interests to be threatened is stressed.

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