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Reconstruction : voices from America's first great struggle for racial equality

Author: Brooks D Simpson
Publisher: New York, N.Y. : Library of America, [2018] ©2018
Series: Library of America, 303.
Edition/Format:   Print book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
"The defeat of the Confederacy and the adoption of the Thirteenth Amendment in 1865 brought about the final destruction of slavery in the United States. Americans were confronted for the first time with the possibility of creating a republic dedicated to the principle of racial equality. What followed over the next twelve years was one of the most complex, inspiring, and ultimately tragic eras in American history.  Read more...
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Genre/Form: History
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Brooks D Simpson
ISBN: 9781598535556 1598535552
OCLC Number: 987279226
Description: xxix, 778 pages ; 21 cm
Contents: Presidential Reconstruction, 1865-1866. "Do nothing with us!" (What the Black man wants, Massachusetts, January 26, 1865) / Frederick Douglass --
Speech on Reconstruction (April 11, 1865, Washington, D.C.) / Abraham Lincoln --
Forgiving rebels (Restoration of the Union, Massachusetts, April 20, 1865) / Springfield Republican --
"Treason is a crime" (Interview with Pennsylvania Delegation, Washington, D.C., May 3, 1865) / Andrew Johnson --
Muskets and ballots (North Carolina, May 10, 1865) / Colored Men of North Carolina to Andrew Johnson --
"Liberty to work" (Reply to a delegation of colored ministers, Washington, D.C., May 11, 1865) / Andrew Johnson --
Three classes of white citizens (North Carolina, May 12, 1865) / Salmon P. Chase to Andrew Johnson --
The necessity of black suffrage (New York, May 27, 1865) / Joseph Noxon to Andrew Johnson --
"Most inhuman laws" (Washington, D.C., June 9, 1865) / Delegation of Kentucky colored people to Andrew Johnson --
False ideas of freedom (An Exchange, South Carolina, June 12 and 21, 1865) / Charles C. Soule and Oliver O. Howard --
"The grasp of war" (Speech at Boston, Massachusetts, June 21, 1865) / Richard Henry Dana --
"Shame & disaster" (Massachusetts, July 4, 1865) / Charles Sumner to Gideon Welles --
The danger of rebels in Congress (Massachusetts, July 8, 1865) / Wendell Phillips to the National Anti-Slavery Standard --
"The white race alone" (Maryland, August 1, 1865) / Francis Preston Blair to Andrew Johnson --
Defending "pure freedom" (Alabama, August 2, 1865) / Colored people of Mobile to Andrew J. Smith --
"Send us our wages" (Ohio, August 7, 1865) / Jourdon Anderson to P.H. Anderson --
Lawlessness and disloyalty (Mississippi, August 29, 1865) / Carl Schurz to Andrew Johnson --
"Indentures of apprenticeship" (North Carolina, September 4, 1865) / Christopher Memminger to Andrew Johnson --
Confiscating rebel estates (Speech at Lancaster, Pennsylvania, September 6, 1865) / Thaddeus Stevens --
"The question of negro suffrage" (New York, September 28, 1865) / Georges Clemenceau to Le Temps --
"We must be patient" (Interview with President Johnson, Washington, D.C., October 3, 1865) / George L. Stearns --
Speech to the 1st U.S. Colored Infantry (Washington, D.C., October 10, 1865) / Andrew Johnson --
"A lying, lazy people" (Virginia, October 12, 1865) / Sarah Whittlesey to Andrew Johnson --
"The only true and loyal people" (South Carolina, October 28, 1865) / Edisto Island Freedmen to Andrew Johnson --
Fear of armed freedmen (Tennessee, October 30, 1865) / J.A. Williamson to Nathan A.M. Dudley --
Claiming the rights of citizenship : Address of the Colored State Convention to the people of South Carolina (South Carolina, November 24, 1865) --
Prospects for the State Convention (Texas, November 27, 1865) / Andrew J. Hamilton to Andrew Johnson --
Travels in the Carolinas and Georgia : From The South Since the War (September-December 1865) / Sidney Andrews --
"Submission to necessity" : From Report on the Condition of the South (Washington, D.C., December 1865) / Carl Schurz --
"Such universal acquiescence" (Washington, D.C., December 18, 1865) / Ulysses S. Grant to Andrew Johnson --
"The Pharaoh of our day" : From Caste among Masons (Massachusetts, December 1865) / Lewis Hayden --
Destitution among the freed people (Georgia, January 9 and 19, 1866) / Harriet Jacobs to The Freedman --
"Insane malice against the freedman" (Virginia, January 15, 1866) / Marcus S. Hopkins to James Johnson --
Debating suffrage : an exchange and reply of the colored delegation to President Johnson (Washington, D.C., February 7, 1866) / Andrew Johnson and Frederick Douglass --
Objections to the Freedmen's Bureau (Washington, D.C., February 9, 1866) / Joseph S. Fullerton to Andrew Johnson --
Veto of the Freedmen's Bureau Bill (Washington, D.C., February 19, 1866) / Andrew Johnson --
Speech on Washington's Birthday (Washington, D.C., February 22, 1866) / Andrew Johnson --
Veto of the Civil Rights Bill (Washington, D.C., March 27, 1866) / Andrew Johnson. Congressional Reconstruction, 1866-1869. Suffrage for women (West Virginia, April 1, 1866) / Maria F. Chandler to Thaddeus Stephens --
Defining radicalism (Radicalism and conservatism, New York, April 21, 1866) / Harper's Weekly --
"Accept what is possible" (Speech in Congress on the Fourteenth Amendment, Washington, D.C., May 8, 1866) / Thaddeus Stevens --
"We are all bound up together" (Speech at the National Woman's Rights Convention, New York, May 10, 1866) / Frances Ellen Watkins Harper --
The Memphis riot (Tennessee, May 12, 1866) / George Stoneman to Ulysses S. Grant --
Southern "rights" (An hour with Gen. Grant, Washington, D.C., May 24, 1866) / The New York Times --
"Butcheries and atrocities" (Tennessee, May 24, 1866) / Elihu B. Washburne to Thaddeus Stevens --
"They all fired at her" (Testimony to House Select Committee, Tennessee, May 30, 1866) / Cynthia Townsend --
Joint Resolution Proposing the Fourteenth Amendment (Washington, D.C., June 13, 1866) --
Treason and the Democrats : From Speech at Indianapolis (Indiana, June 20, 1866) / Oliver P. Morton --
The New Orleans riot (Louisiana, August 1 and 2, 1866) / Philip H. Sheridan to Ulysses S. Grant --
The President's responsibility (The massacre in New Orleans, New York, August 1866) / Harper's Weekly --
Speech at St. Louis (Missouri, September 8, 1866) / Andrew Johnson --
"Congress is the sovereign power" (Speech at Lancaster, Pennsylvania, September 27, 1866) / Thaddeus Stevens --
"Let there be no hesitation" (Reconstruction, December 1866) / Frederick Douglass --
"No nearer to a true republic" (Speech in Congress on Reconstruction, Washington, D.C., January 3, 1867) / Thaddeus Stevens --
"Spurning self-degradation" (No amendment : stand firm, Alabama, January 9, 1867) / Mobile Daily Advertiser and Register --
"An oligarchy or a republic?" (To the Voters of Guilford, North Carolina, October 21, 1867) / Albion W. Tourgée --
"Doubtful grounds" (Impeachment, New York, December 14, 1867) / Harper's Weekly --
Republican timidity (The reaction, North Carolina, January 4, 1868) / Albion W. Tourgée --
"Absolute and despotic power" (The president must be impeached, New York, February 24, 1868) / New-York Tribune --
"His wicked determination" (Speech in Congress on impeachment, Washington, D.C., February 24, 1868) / Thaddeus Stevens --
The new state Constitution (White men to the rescue!, Louisiana, March 1868) / Bossier Banner --
The president's acquittal (The result of the trial, New York, May 21, 1868) / The Nation --
Overthrowing Reconstruction (Washington, D.C., June 30, 1868) / Frank P. Blair to James O. Broadhead --
Electing Grant (The work before us, August 27, 1868) / Frederick Douglass --
"Universal suffrage" (Gerrit Smith on Petitions, New York, January 14, 1869) / Elizabeth Cady Stanton --
Joint Resolution Proposing the Fifteenth Amendment (Washington, D.C., February 27, 1869). "Let us have peace," 1869-1873. First Inaugural Address (Washington, D.C., March 4, 1869) / Ulysses S. Grant --
"The question of precedence" (Exchange on suffrage, New York, May 12, 1869) / Frederick Douglass and Susan B. Anthony --
A lynching in Tennessee (Only a nigger, The Buffalo Express, New York, August 26, 1869) / Mark Twain --
"Struggle for their existence" (France, November 3, 1869) / Georges Clemenceau to Le Temps --
"It secures political equality" (Reconstruction nationalized, New York, February 21, 1870) / The New York Times --
A Klan insurrection (North Carolina, March 10, 1870) / William W. Holden to Ulysses S. Grant --
"The greatest civil change" (Message to Congress on the Fifteenth Amendment, Washington, D.C., March 30, 1870) / Ulysses S. Grant --
Klan terrorism (North Carolina, May 24, 1870) / Albion W. Tourgée to Joseph C. Abbott --
"Inhuman and brutal outrages (South Carolina, October 22, 1870) / Robert K. Scott to Ulysses S. Grant --
"Their evil example" (Exchange on amnesty, New York and Washington, D.C., March 16-17, 1871) / Horace Greeley and Robert Brown Elliott --
Protecting rights (Speech in Congress on the Enforcement Bill, Washington, D.C., April 1, 1871) / Joseph H. Rainey --
Preserving local government (From Speech in Congress on the Enforcement Bill, Washington, D.C., April 4, 1871) / James A. Garfield --
The murder of John Walthall (Testimony to the Joint Select Committee, Atlanta, Georgia, October 21, 1871) / Maria Carter --
Accepting a nomination (Reply to Committee of the Liberal Republican Convention, New York, May 20, 1872) / Horace Greeley --
Grant over Greeley (Speech at New York City, September 25, 1872) / Frederick Douglass --
"A descent into barbarism" (South Carolina prostrate, South Carolina, March 29, 1873) / James S. Pike --
Second Inaugural Address (Washington, D.C., March 4, 1873) / Ulysses S. Grant. The end of Reconstruction, 1873-1877. "Dead men all around me" (Testimony in the Colfax Massacre Trial, New Orleans, Louisiana, February 27 and March 3, 1874) / Levi Nelson and Benjamin Brim --
"Perfect equality before the law" (Speech in Congress on the Civil Rights Bill, Washington, D.C., January 6, 1874) / Robert Brown Elliott --
"I am tired of this nonsense" (General Grant's new departure, Washington, D.C., January 20, 1874) / New York Herald --
"A nation of croakers" (Speech in Congress on the Civil Rights Bill, Washington, D.C., January 24, 1874) / Richard Harvey Cain --
"I am treated as a pariah" (Speech in Congress on the Civil Rights Bill, Washington, D.C., June 9, 1874) / James T. Rapier --
"A reign of terror" (Massachusetts, September 3, 1874) / William Lloyd Garrison to the Boston Journal --
"A war of intimidation" (Louisiana, October 31, 1874) / Eugene Lawrence to Harper's Weekly --
A black veteran's appeal (Tennessee, November 9, 1874) / Isaac Loveless to Ulysses S. Grant --
From Annual Message to Congress (Washington, D.C., December 7, 1874) / Ulysses S. Grant --
Suppressing terrorism (Louisiana, January 4 and 5, 1875) / Philip H. Sheridan to William W. Belknap --
"A gross and manifest violation" (From Speech in the Senate on Louisiana, Washington, D.C., January 11, 1875) / Carl Schurz --
Defending Grant and Sheridan (Massachusetts, January 12, 1875) / William Lloyd Garrison to the Boston Journal --
Message to the Senate on Louisiana (Washington, D.C., January 13, 1875) / Ulysses S. Grant --
Social rights and public rights (From Speech in Congress on the Civil Rights Bill, Washington, D.C., February 3, 1875) / John R. Lynch --
"His condition cannot be altered" (From Speech in Congress on the Civil Rights Bill, Washington, D.C., February 3, 1875) / Thomas Whitehead --
"The pride of blood and race" (Speech in Congress on the Civil Rights Bill, Washington, D.C., February 4, 1875) / Charles A. Eldredge --
"This act of plain justice" (From Speech in Congress on the Civil Rights Bill, Washington, D.C., February 4, 1875) / James A. Garfield --
An election plan (How to meet the case, Mississippi, August 4, 1875) / Hinds County Gazette --
"The whole public are tired out" (New Jersey, September 13, 1875) / Ulysses S. Grant to Edwards Pierrepont --
Refusing an appeal for aid (Washington, D.C., September 14, 1875) / Edwards Pierrepont to Adelbert Ames --
"A kind of guerrilla war" (Mississippi, September 23, 1875) / Sarah A. Dickey to Ulysses S. Grant --
Murder in Hinds County, Mississippi, September-December 1875 (Testimony to the Select Senate Committee, June 20, 1876) / Margaret Ann Caldwell --
The failure of Reconstruction (Root, hog, or die, North Carolina, 1876) / Albion W. Tourgée --
Defending Republican rule (Speech in Congress on Mississippi, Washington, D.C., February 10, 1876) / John R. Lynch --
The "barbarous" Hamburg massacre (Washington, D.C., July 26, 1876) / Ulysses S. Grant to Daniel H. Chamberlain --
Republican corruption (The South in the canvass, New York, July 27, 1876) / The Nation --
"Every one was a Democrat" (From Speech at Indianapolis, Indiana, September 21, 1876) / Robert G. Ingersoll --
Intimidation at the polls (Georgia, October 14, 1876) / David Brundage to Ulysses S. Grant --
The election results (Diary, Ohio, November 12, 1876) / Rutherford B. Hayes --
The electoral crisis (Memorandum of Conversation with Ulysses S. Grant, Washington, D.C., December 3, 1876) / Abram Hewitt --
"The public demand peace" (The court of arbitration, Illinois, January 21, 1877) / Chicago Tribune --
"Let us not delude ourselves" (The warning, Missouri, March 31, 1877) / St. Louis Globe Democrat --
"Nothing more to do with him" (The political South hereafter, New York, April 5, 1877) / The Nation. Coda, 1879. Reflecting on Reconstruction (From Around the world with General Grant, China, Spring 1879) / John Russell Young ; "The destruction of a free ballot" (From Remarks in Congress on South Carolina elections, Washington, D.C., March 3, 1879) / Joseph H. Rainey.
Series Title: Library of America, 303.
Responsibility: Brooks D. Simpson, editor.
More information:

Abstract:

"The defeat of the Confederacy and the adoption of the Thirteenth Amendment in 1865 brought about the final destruction of slavery in the United States. Americans were confronted for the first time with the possibility of creating a republic dedicated to the principle of racial equality. What followed over the next twelve years was one of the most complex, inspiring, and ultimately tragic eras in American history. Reconstruction: Voices From America's First Great Struggle For Racial Equality brings this tumultuous and fateful period to dramatic and violent life through the vivid testimony of more than sixty participants and observers. Here is a vitally important book for anyone interested in this crucial period and its inescapable relevance for today."--

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<http:\/\/www.worldcat.org\/oclc\/987279226<\/a>> # Reconstruction : voices from America\'s first great struggle for racial equality<\/span>\n\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0a \nschema:CreativeWork<\/a>, schema:Book<\/a> ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nlibrary:oclcnum<\/a> \"987279226<\/span>\" ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nlibrary:placeOfPublication<\/a> <http:\/\/id.loc.gov\/vocabulary\/countries\/nyu<\/a>> ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:about<\/a> <http:\/\/experiment.worldcat.org\/entity\/work\/data\/4741884051#Topic\/history_african_american<\/a>> ; # HISTORY--African American<\/span>\n\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:about<\/a> <http:\/\/dewey.info\/class\/973.8\/e23\/<\/a>> ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:about<\/a> <http:\/\/experiment.worldcat.org\/entity\/work\/data\/4741884051#Place\/united_states<\/a>> ; # United States.<\/span>\n\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:about<\/a> <http:\/\/experiment.worldcat.org\/entity\/work\/data\/4741884051#Topic\/race_discrimination<\/a>> ; # Race discrimination<\/span>\n\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:about<\/a> <http:\/\/experiment.worldcat.org\/entity\/work\/data\/4741884051#Topic\/history_social_history<\/a>> ; # HISTORY--Social History<\/span>\n\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:about<\/a> <http:\/\/experiment.worldcat.org\/entity\/work\/data\/4741884051#Topic\/reconstruction_u_s_history_1865_1877<\/a>> ; # Reconstruction (U.S. history, 1865-1877)<\/span>\n\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:about<\/a> <http:\/\/experiment.worldcat.org\/entity\/work\/data\/4741884051#Topic\/social_aspects<\/a>> ; # Social aspects<\/span>\n\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:about<\/a> <http:\/\/experiment.worldcat.org\/entity\/work\/data\/4741884051#Event\/1861_1877<\/a>> ; # 1861-1877<\/span>\n\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:about<\/a> <http:\/\/experiment.worldcat.org\/entity\/work\/data\/4741884051#Topic\/history_united_states_civil_war_period_1850_1877<\/a>> ; # HISTORY--United States--Civil War Period (1850-1877)<\/span>\n\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:about<\/a> <http:\/\/experiment.worldcat.org\/entity\/work\/data\/4741884051#Topic\/race_discrimination_united_states_history<\/a>> ; # Race discrimination--United States--History<\/span>\n\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:bookFormat<\/a> bgn:PrintBook<\/a> ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:copyrightYear<\/a> \"2018<\/span>\" ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:datePublished<\/a> \"2018<\/span>\" ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:description<\/a> \"\"Let us have peace,\" 1869-1873. First Inaugural Address (Washington, D.C., March 4, 1869) \/ Ulysses S. Grant -- \"The question of precedence\" (Exchange on suffrage, New York, May 12, 1869) \/ Frederick Douglass and Susan B. Anthony -- A lynching in Tennessee (Only a nigger, The Buffalo Express, New York, August 26, 1869) \/ Mark Twain -- \"Struggle for their existence\" (France, November 3, 1869) \/ Georges Clemenceau to Le Temps -- \"It secures political equality\" (Reconstruction nationalized, New York, February 21, 1870) \/ The New York Times -- A Klan insurrection (North Carolina, March 10, 1870) \/ William W. Holden to Ulysses S. Grant -- \"The greatest civil change\" (Message to Congress on the Fifteenth Amendment, Washington, D.C., March 30, 1870) \/ Ulysses S. Grant -- Klan terrorism (North Carolina, May 24, 1870) \/ Albion W. Tourg\u00E9e to Joseph C. Abbott -- \"Inhuman and brutal outrages (South Carolina, October 22, 1870) \/ Robert K. Scott to Ulysses S. Grant -- \"Their evil example\" (Exchange on amnesty, New York and Washington, D.C., March 16-17, 1871) \/ Horace Greeley and Robert Brown Elliott -- Protecting rights (Speech in Congress on the Enforcement Bill, Washington, D.C., April 1, 1871) \/ Joseph H. Rainey -- Preserving local government (From Speech in Congress on the Enforcement Bill, Washington, D.C., April 4, 1871) \/ James A. Garfield -- The murder of John Walthall (Testimony to the Joint Select Committee, Atlanta, Georgia, October 21, 1871) \/ Maria Carter -- Accepting a nomination (Reply to Committee of the Liberal Republican Convention, New York, May 20, 1872) \/ Horace Greeley -- Grant over Greeley (Speech at New York City, September 25, 1872) \/ Frederick Douglass -- \"A descent into barbarism\" (South Carolina prostrate, South Carolina, March 29, 1873) \/ James S. Pike -- Second Inaugural Address (Washington, D.C., March 4, 1873) \/ Ulysses S. Grant.<\/span>\"@en<\/a> ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:description<\/a> \"Congressional Reconstruction, 1866-1869. Suffrage for women (West Virginia, April 1, 1866) \/ Maria F. Chandler to Thaddeus Stephens -- Defining radicalism (Radicalism and conservatism, New York, April 21, 1866) \/ Harper\'s Weekly -- \"Accept what is possible\" (Speech in Congress on the Fourteenth Amendment, Washington, D.C., May 8, 1866) \/ Thaddeus Stevens -- \"We are all bound up together\" (Speech at the National Woman\'s Rights Convention, New York, May 10, 1866) \/ Frances Ellen Watkins Harper -- The Memphis riot (Tennessee, May 12, 1866) \/ George Stoneman to Ulysses S. Grant -- Southern \"rights\" (An hour with Gen. Grant, Washington, D.C., May 24, 1866) \/ The New York Times -- \"Butcheries and atrocities\" (Tennessee, May 24, 1866) \/ Elihu B. Washburne to Thaddeus Stevens -- \"They all fired at her\" (Testimony to House Select Committee, Tennessee, May 30, 1866) \/ Cynthia Townsend -- Joint Resolution Proposing the Fourteenth Amendment (Washington, D.C., June 13, 1866) -- Treason and the Democrats : From Speech at Indianapolis (Indiana, June 20, 1866) \/ Oliver P. Morton -- The New Orleans riot (Louisiana, August 1 and 2, 1866) \/ Philip H. Sheridan to Ulysses S. Grant -- The President\'s responsibility (The massacre in New Orleans, New York, August 1866) \/ Harper\'s Weekly -- Speech at St. Louis (Missouri, September 8, 1866) \/ Andrew Johnson -- \"Congress is the sovereign power\" (Speech at Lancaster, Pennsylvania, September 27, 1866) \/ Thaddeus Stevens -- \"Let there be no hesitation\" (Reconstruction, December 1866) \/ Frederick Douglass -- \"No nearer to a true republic\" (Speech in Congress on Reconstruction, Washington, D.C., January 3, 1867) \/ Thaddeus Stevens -- \"Spurning self-degradation\" (No amendment : stand firm, Alabama, January 9, 1867) \/ Mobile Daily Advertiser and Register -- \"An oligarchy or a republic?\" (To the Voters of Guilford, North Carolina, October 21, 1867) \/ Albion W. Tourg\u00E9e -- \"Doubtful grounds\" (Impeachment, New York, December 14, 1867) \/ Harper\'s Weekly -- Republican timidity (The reaction, North Carolina, January 4, 1868) \/ Albion W. Tourg\u00E9e -- \"Absolute and despotic power\" (The president must be impeached, New York, February 24, 1868) \/ New-York Tribune -- \"His wicked determination\" (Speech in Congress on impeachment, Washington, D.C., February 24, 1868) \/ Thaddeus Stevens -- The new state Constitution (White men to the rescue!, Louisiana, March 1868) \/ Bossier Banner -- The president\'s acquittal (The result of the trial, New York, May 21, 1868) \/ The Nation -- Overthrowing Reconstruction (Washington, D.C., June 30, 1868) \/ Frank P. Blair to James O. Broadhead -- Electing Grant (The work before us, August 27, 1868) \/ Frederick Douglass -- \"Universal suffrage\" (Gerrit Smith on Petitions, New York, January 14, 1869) \/ Elizabeth Cady Stanton -- Joint Resolution Proposing the Fifteenth Amendment (Washington, D.C., February 27, 1869).<\/span>\"@en<\/a> ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:description<\/a> \"The end of Reconstruction, 1873-1877. \"Dead men all around me\" (Testimony in the Colfax Massacre Trial, New Orleans, Louisiana, February 27 and March 3, 1874) \/ Levi Nelson and Benjamin Brim -- \"Perfect equality before the law\" (Speech in Congress on the Civil Rights Bill, Washington, D.C., January 6, 1874) \/ Robert Brown Elliott -- \"I am tired of this nonsense\" (General Grant\'s new departure, Washington, D.C., January 20, 1874) \/ New York Herald -- \"A nation of croakers\" (Speech in Congress on the Civil Rights Bill, Washington, D.C., January 24, 1874) \/ Richard Harvey Cain -- \"I am treated as a pariah\" (Speech in Congress on the Civil Rights Bill, Washington, D.C., June 9, 1874) \/ James T. Rapier -- \"A reign of terror\" (Massachusetts, September 3, 1874) \/ William Lloyd Garrison to the Boston Journal -- \"A war of intimidation\" (Louisiana, October 31, 1874) \/ Eugene Lawrence to Harper\'s Weekly -- A black veteran\'s appeal (Tennessee, November 9, 1874) \/ Isaac Loveless to Ulysses S. Grant -- From Annual Message to Congress (Washington, D.C., December 7, 1874) \/ Ulysses S. Grant -- Suppressing terrorism (Louisiana, January 4 and 5, 1875) \/ Philip H. Sheridan to William W. Belknap -- \"A gross and manifest violation\" (From Speech in the Senate on Louisiana, Washington, D.C., January 11, 1875) \/ Carl Schurz -- Defending Grant and Sheridan (Massachusetts, January 12, 1875) \/ William Lloyd Garrison to the Boston Journal -- Message to the Senate on Louisiana (Washington, D.C., January 13, 1875) \/ Ulysses S. Grant -- Social rights and public rights (From Speech in Congress on the Civil Rights Bill, Washington, D.C., February 3, 1875) \/ John R. Lynch -- \"His condition cannot be altered\" (From Speech in Congress on the Civil Rights Bill, Washington, D.C., February 3, 1875) \/ Thomas Whitehead -- \"The pride of blood and race\" (Speech in Congress on the Civil Rights Bill, Washington, D.C., February 4, 1875) \/ Charles A. Eldredge -- \"This act of plain justice\" (From Speech in Congress on the Civil Rights Bill, Washington, D.C., February 4, 1875) \/ James A. Garfield -- An election plan (How to meet the case, Mississippi, August 4, 1875) \/ Hinds County Gazette -- \"The whole public are tired out\" (New Jersey, September 13, 1875) \/ Ulysses S. Grant to Edwards Pierrepont -- Refusing an appeal for aid (Washington, D.C., September 14, 1875) \/ Edwards Pierrepont to Adelbert Ames -- \"A kind of guerrilla war\" (Mississippi, September 23, 1875) \/ Sarah A. Dickey to Ulysses S. Grant -- Murder in Hinds County, Mississippi, September-December 1875 (Testimony to the Select Senate Committee, June 20, 1876) \/ Margaret Ann Caldwell -- The failure of Reconstruction (Root, hog, or die, North Carolina, 1876) \/ Albion W. Tourg\u00E9e -- Defending Republican rule (Speech in Congress on Mississippi, Washington, D.C., February 10, 1876) \/ John R. Lynch -- The \"barbarous\" Hamburg massacre (Washington, D.C., July 26, 1876) \/ Ulysses S. Grant to Daniel H. Chamberlain -- Republican corruption (The South in the canvass, New York, July 27, 1876) \/ The Nation -- \"Every one was a Democrat\" (From Speech at Indianapolis, Indiana, September 21, 1876) \/ Robert G. Ingersoll -- Intimidation at the polls (Georgia, October 14, 1876) \/ David Brundage to Ulysses S. Grant -- The election results (Diary, Ohio, November 12, 1876) \/ Rutherford B. Hayes -- The electoral crisis (Memorandum of Conversation with Ulysses S. Grant, Washington, D.C., December 3, 1876) \/ Abram Hewitt -- \"The public demand peace\" (The court of arbitration, Illinois, January 21, 1877) \/ Chicago Tribune -- \"Let us not delude ourselves\" (The warning, Missouri, March 31, 1877) \/ St. Louis Globe Democrat -- \"Nothing more to do with him\" (The political South hereafter, New York, April 5, 1877) \/ The Nation.<\/span>\"@en<\/a> ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:description<\/a> \"Presidential Reconstruction, 1865-1866. \"Do nothing with us!\" (What the Black man wants, Massachusetts, January 26, 1865) \/ Frederick Douglass -- Speech on Reconstruction (April 11, 1865, Washington, D.C.) \/ Abraham Lincoln -- Forgiving rebels (Restoration of the Union, Massachusetts, April 20, 1865) \/ Springfield Republican -- \"Treason is a crime\" (Interview with Pennsylvania Delegation, Washington, D.C., May 3, 1865) \/ Andrew Johnson -- Muskets and ballots (North Carolina, May 10, 1865) \/ Colored Men of North Carolina to Andrew Johnson -- \"Liberty to work\" (Reply to a delegation of colored ministers, Washington, D.C., May 11, 1865) \/ Andrew Johnson -- Three classes of white citizens (North Carolina, May 12, 1865) \/ Salmon P. Chase to Andrew Johnson -- The necessity of black suffrage (New York, May 27, 1865) \/ Joseph Noxon to Andrew Johnson -- \"Most inhuman laws\" (Washington, D.C., June 9, 1865) \/ Delegation of Kentucky colored people to Andrew Johnson -- False ideas of freedom (An Exchange, South Carolina, June 12 and 21, 1865) \/ Charles C. Soule and Oliver O. Howard -- \"The grasp of war\" (Speech at Boston, Massachusetts, June 21, 1865) \/ Richard Henry Dana -- \"Shame & disaster\" (Massachusetts, July 4, 1865) \/ Charles Sumner to Gideon Welles -- The danger of rebels in Congress (Massachusetts, July 8, 1865) \/ Wendell Phillips to the National Anti-Slavery Standard -- \"The white race alone\" (Maryland, August 1, 1865) \/ Francis Preston Blair to Andrew Johnson -- Defending \"pure freedom\" (Alabama, August 2, 1865) \/ Colored people of Mobile to Andrew J. Smith -- \"Send us our wages\" (Ohio, August 7, 1865) \/ Jourdon Anderson to P.H. Anderson -- Lawlessness and disloyalty (Mississippi, August 29, 1865) \/ Carl Schurz to Andrew Johnson -- \"Indentures of apprenticeship\" (North Carolina, September 4, 1865) \/ Christopher Memminger to Andrew Johnson -- Confiscating rebel estates (Speech at Lancaster, Pennsylvania, September 6, 1865) \/ Thaddeus Stevens -- \"The question of negro suffrage\" (New York, September 28, 1865) \/ Georges Clemenceau to Le Temps -- \"We must be patient\" (Interview with President Johnson, Washington, D.C., October 3, 1865) \/ George L. Stearns -- Speech to the 1st U.S. Colored Infantry (Washington, D.C., October 10, 1865) \/ Andrew Johnson -- \"A lying, lazy people\" (Virginia, October 12, 1865) \/ Sarah Whittlesey to Andrew Johnson -- \"The only true and loyal people\" (South Carolina, October 28, 1865) \/ Edisto Island Freedmen to Andrew Johnson -- Fear of armed freedmen (Tennessee, October 30, 1865) \/ J.A. Williamson to Nathan A.M. Dudley -- Claiming the rights of citizenship : Address of the Colored State Convention to the people of South Carolina (South Carolina, November 24, 1865) -- Prospects for the State Convention (Texas, November 27, 1865) \/ Andrew J. Hamilton to Andrew Johnson -- Travels in the Carolinas and Georgia : From The South Since the War (September-December 1865) \/ Sidney Andrews -- \"Submission to necessity\" : From Report on the Condition of the South (Washington, D.C., December 1865) \/ Carl Schurz -- \"Such universal acquiescence\" (Washington, D.C., December 18, 1865) \/ Ulysses S. Grant to Andrew Johnson -- \"The Pharaoh of our day\" : From Caste among Masons (Massachusetts, December 1865) \/ Lewis Hayden -- Destitution among the freed people (Georgia, January 9 and 19, 1866) \/ Harriet Jacobs to The Freedman -- \"Insane malice against the freedman\" (Virginia, January 15, 1866) \/ Marcus S. Hopkins to James Johnson -- Debating suffrage : an exchange and reply of the colored delegation to President Johnson (Washington, D.C., February 7, 1866) \/ Andrew Johnson and Frederick Douglass -- Objections to the Freedmen\'s Bureau (Washington, D.C., February 9, 1866) \/ Joseph S. Fullerton to Andrew Johnson -- Veto of the Freedmen\'s Bureau Bill (Washington, D.C., February 19, 1866) \/ Andrew Johnson -- Speech on Washington\'s Birthday (Washington, D.C., February 22, 1866) \/ Andrew Johnson -- Veto of the Civil Rights Bill (Washington, D.C., March 27, 1866) \/ Andrew Johnson.<\/span>\"@en<\/a> ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:description<\/a> \"\"The defeat of the Confederacy and the adoption of the Thirteenth Amendment in 1865 brought about the final destruction of slavery in the United States. Americans were confronted for the first time with the possibility of creating a republic dedicated to the principle of racial equality. What followed over the next twelve years was one of the most complex, inspiring, and ultimately tragic eras in American history. Reconstruction: Voices From America\'s First Great Struggle For Racial Equality brings this tumultuous and fateful period to dramatic and violent life through the vivid testimony of more than sixty participants and observers. Here is a vitally important book for anyone interested in this crucial period and its inescapable relevance for today.\"--<\/span>\"@en<\/a> ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:description<\/a> \"Coda, 1879. Reflecting on Reconstruction (From Around the world with General Grant, China, Spring 1879) \/ John Russell Young ; \"The destruction of a free ballot\" (From Remarks in Congress on South Carolina elections, Washington, D.C., March 3, 1879) \/ Joseph H. Rainey.<\/span>\"@en<\/a> ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:editor<\/a> <http:\/\/experiment.worldcat.org\/entity\/work\/data\/4741884051#Person\/simpson_brooks_d<\/a>> ; # Brooks D. Simpson<\/span>\n\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:exampleOfWork<\/a> <http:\/\/worldcat.org\/entity\/work\/id\/4741884051<\/a>> ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:genre<\/a> \"History<\/span>\"@en<\/a> ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:inLanguage<\/a> \"en<\/span>\" ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:isPartOf<\/a> <http:\/\/experiment.worldcat.org\/entity\/work\/data\/4741884051#Series\/library_of_america<\/a>> ; # Library of America ;<\/span>\n\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:name<\/a> \"Reconstruction : voices from America\'s first great struggle for racial equality<\/span>\"@en<\/a> ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:productID<\/a> \"987279226<\/span>\" ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:workExample<\/a> <http:\/\/worldcat.org\/isbn\/9781598535556<\/a>> ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\numbel:isLike<\/a> <http:\/\/bnb.data.bl.uk\/id\/resource\/GBB830693<\/a>> ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nwdrs:describedby<\/a> <http:\/\/www.worldcat.org\/title\/-\/oclc\/987279226<\/a>> ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0.\n\n\n<\/div>\n\n

Related Entities<\/h3>\n
<http:\/\/dewey.info\/class\/973.8\/e23\/<\/a>>\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0a \nschema:Intangible<\/a> ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0.\n\n\n<\/div>\n
<http:\/\/experiment.worldcat.org\/entity\/work\/data\/4741884051#Event\/1861_1877<\/a>> # 1861-1877<\/span>\n\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0a \nschema:Event<\/a> ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:name<\/a> \"1861-1877<\/span>\" ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0.\n\n\n<\/div>\n
<http:\/\/experiment.worldcat.org\/entity\/work\/data\/4741884051#Person\/simpson_brooks_d<\/a>> # Brooks D. Simpson<\/span>\n\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0a \nschema:Person<\/a> ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:familyName<\/a> \"Simpson<\/span>\" ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:givenName<\/a> \"Brooks D.<\/span>\" ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:name<\/a> \"Brooks D. Simpson<\/span>\" ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0.\n\n\n<\/div>\n
<http:\/\/experiment.worldcat.org\/entity\/work\/data\/4741884051#Place\/united_states<\/a>> # United States.<\/span>\n\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0a \nschema:Place<\/a> ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:name<\/a> \"United States.<\/span>\" ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:name<\/a> \"United States<\/span>\" ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0.\n\n\n<\/div>\n
<http:\/\/experiment.worldcat.org\/entity\/work\/data\/4741884051#Series\/library_of_america<\/a>> # Library of America ;<\/span>\n\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0a \nbgn:PublicationSeries<\/a> ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:hasPart<\/a> <http:\/\/www.worldcat.org\/oclc\/987279226<\/a>> ; # Reconstruction : voices from America\'s first great struggle for racial equality<\/span>\n\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:name<\/a> \"Library of America ;<\/span>\" ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0.\n\n\n<\/div>\n
<http:\/\/experiment.worldcat.org\/entity\/work\/data\/4741884051#Topic\/history_african_american<\/a>> # HISTORY--African American<\/span>\n\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0a \nschema:Intangible<\/a> ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:name<\/a> \"HISTORY--African American<\/span>\"@en<\/a> ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0.\n\n\n<\/div>\n
<http:\/\/experiment.worldcat.org\/entity\/work\/data\/4741884051#Topic\/history_social_history<\/a>> # HISTORY--Social History<\/span>\n\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0a \nschema:Intangible<\/a> ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:name<\/a> \"HISTORY--Social History<\/span>\"@en<\/a> ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0.\n\n\n<\/div>\n
<http:\/\/experiment.worldcat.org\/entity\/work\/data\/4741884051#Topic\/history_united_states_civil_war_period_1850_1877<\/a>> # HISTORY--United States--Civil War Period (1850-1877)<\/span>\n\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0a \nschema:Intangible<\/a> ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:name<\/a> \"HISTORY--United States--Civil War Period (1850-1877)<\/span>\"@en<\/a> ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0.\n\n\n<\/div>\n
<http:\/\/experiment.worldcat.org\/entity\/work\/data\/4741884051#Topic\/race_discrimination<\/a>> # Race discrimination<\/span>\n\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0a \nschema:Intangible<\/a> ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:name<\/a> \"Race discrimination<\/span>\"@en<\/a> ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0.\n\n\n<\/div>\n
<http:\/\/experiment.worldcat.org\/entity\/work\/data\/4741884051#Topic\/race_discrimination_united_states_history<\/a>> # Race discrimination--United States--History<\/span>\n\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0a \nschema:Intangible<\/a> ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:name<\/a> \"Race discrimination--United States--History<\/span>\"@en<\/a> ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0.\n\n\n<\/div>\n
<http:\/\/experiment.worldcat.org\/entity\/work\/data\/4741884051#Topic\/reconstruction_u_s_history_1865_1877<\/a>> # Reconstruction (U.S. history, 1865-1877)<\/span>\n\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0a \nschema:Intangible<\/a> ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:name<\/a> \"Reconstruction (U.S. history, 1865-1877)<\/span>\"@en<\/a> ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0.\n\n\n<\/div>\n
<http:\/\/experiment.worldcat.org\/entity\/work\/data\/4741884051#Topic\/social_aspects<\/a>> # Social aspects<\/span>\n\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0a \nschema:Intangible<\/a> ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:name<\/a> \"Social aspects<\/span>\"@en<\/a> ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0.\n\n\n<\/div>\n
<http:\/\/id.loc.gov\/vocabulary\/countries\/nyu<\/a>>\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0a \nschema:Place<\/a> ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\ndcterms:identifier<\/a> \"nyu<\/span>\" ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0.\n\n\n<\/div>\n
<http:\/\/worldcat.org\/isbn\/9781598535556<\/a>>\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0a \nschema:ProductModel<\/a> ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:isbn<\/a> \"1598535552<\/span>\" ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:isbn<\/a> \"9781598535556<\/span>\" ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0.\n\n\n<\/div>\n
<http:\/\/www.worldcat.org\/title\/-\/oclc\/987279226<\/a>>\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0a \ngenont:InformationResource<\/a>, genont:ContentTypeGenericResource<\/a> ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:about<\/a> <http:\/\/www.worldcat.org\/oclc\/987279226<\/a>> ; # Reconstruction : voices from America\'s first great struggle for racial equality<\/span>\n\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:dateModified<\/a> \"2020-10-29<\/span>\" ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nvoid:inDataset<\/a> <http:\/\/purl.oclc.org\/dataset\/WorldCat<\/a>> ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0.\n\n\n<\/div>\n\n

Content-negotiable representations<\/p>\n