A Reference Grammar of the Onondaga Language. (eBook, 2018) [WorldCat.org]
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A Reference Grammar of the Onondaga Language.

Author: Hanni Woodbury
Publisher: Toronto : University of Toronto Press, 2018.
Edition/Format:   eBook : Document : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
In this text-based approach to the study of the Onondaga language, Hanni Woodbury provides detailed and careful explanations of the phonological and grammatical processes of a highly endangered language.
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Genre/Form: Electronic books
Additional Physical Format: Print version:
Woodbury, Hanni.
A Reference Grammar of the Onondaga Language.
Toronto : University of Toronto Press, ©2018
Material Type: Document, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: Hanni Woodbury
ISBN: 9781487516093 1487516096
OCLC Number: 1023542808
Notes: 4.4.3.2 Agent Neuters in the Stative Aspect of Active Verbs.
Description: 1 online resource (502 pages)
Contents: Cover; Half Title; Title; Copyright; Dedication; Contents; Figures and Tables; Acknowledgments; Abbreviations; 1 Introduction; 1.1 Onondaga and the Iroquoian Family of Language; 1.2 Linguistic Profile of Onondaga; 1.3 Previous Works on the Onondaga Language; 1.4 The Data: Resources, Their Uses, and Presentation; 2 The Sound System; 2.1 Onondaga Sounds and the Symbols Used to Describe Them; 2.1.1 Vowels; 2.1.2 Consonants; 2.2. Distribution of Phonemes; 2.2.1 Vowel Sequences; 2.2.1.1 Vowel Assimilation (Six Nations); 2.2.2 Consonant Sequences; 2.2.2.1 Surface Consonant Clusters. 2.2.2.2 Changes Involving /kk/ Clusters2.2.2.3 Changes Involving Sequences with /h/; 2.2.2.4 Changes Involving Sequences with Resonants; 2.3 Changes Resulting from the Loss of Northern Iroquoian *r; 2.3.1 The New Vowel; 2.3.2 Changes in Vowel Quality: Vowel Fronting; 2.3.3 Changes in Vowel Length: Compensatory Lengthening; 2.3.4 Changes Resulting from the First Stage of *r-Loss; 2.3.5 *r-Initial Stems Pattern Like Consonant-Initial Stems; 2.4 Loss of *w before y or *r; 2.5 Non-Automatic Morphophonemic Alternations; 2.5.1 Word-Initial and Prepronominal-Pronominal Prefix Boundaries. 2.5.1.1 Change of the Sequences wa?+wa or a+wa to ų2.5.1.2 Vowel Raising; 2.5.1.3 i-Insertion; 2.5.1.4 Dissimilation; 2.5.1.5 Glide Deletion; 2.5.2 The Boundary between Pronominal Prefix and Stem; 2.5.2.1 Vowel Sequences; 2.5.3 The Boundary between Stem and Aspect Suffix; 2.6 Epenthesis; 2.6.1 Prothetic i-; 2.6.2 e-Epenthesis; 2.6.3 The Stem-joiner -a-; 2.7 Prosody; 2.7.1 Historical Background; 2.7.2. Accent; 2.7.3 Syllable Shape and Syllable Weight; 2.7.4 Stress and Vowel Lengthening Processes; 2.7.4.1 Penultimate Vowel Lengthening; 2.7.4.2 Antepenultimate Vowel Lengthening. 2.7.4.3 Second Syllable Vowel Lengthening2.7.5 Footing and the Distribution of Primary and Secondary Stress; 2.7.5.1 The Choice of a Foot Type; 2.7.5.2 Sequencing of Diachronic Developments; 2.7.5.3 Foot Construction; 2.7.6 Comparing Word-Level with Utterance-Final Accent Patterns; 2.7.7 Pitch; 2.7.7.1 Previous Work; 2.7.7.2 The Data; 2.7.7.3 Determining the Location of Peak F0; 3 Parts of Speech; 3.1 The Word: Verbs, Nouns, and Particles; 3.1.1 Identifying the Word; 3.1.2 Parts of Speech; 3.2 The Structure of the Verb; 3.3 The Structure of the Noun; 3.4 Particles; 3.5 Cliticization. 4 The Verb4.1 Introduction; 4.2 Aspect and Mode; 4.2.1 The Basic Aspect Categories; 4.2.1.1 The Habitual Aspect; 4.2.1.2 The Stative Aspect; 4.2.1.3 The Punctual Aspect and Marking Mood; 4.2.1.4 The Imperatives; 4.3 The Pronominal Prefix System; 4.3.1 Intransitive Pronominal Prefixes; 4.3.2 Transitive Pronominal Prefixes; 4.4 How Aspect, Pronominal Selection, and Situation-Type Intersect; 4.4.1 The Major Verb Classes; 4.4.2 Consequentiality and the Active Verb; 4.4.3 Pronominal Prefix Selection in the Major Verb Classes; 4.4.3.1 The Basically Active Verb.
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In this text-based approach to the study of the Onondaga language, Hanni Woodbury provides detailed and careful explanations of the phonological and grammatical processes of a highly endangered  Read more...

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