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Reflections of the Invisible: How Native American Descendants of the Former Northwest Territories (1787-1837) Develop and Maintain a Native American Identity.

Author: Debora F Hurst; Union Institute & University.
Publisher: Ann Arbor : ProQuest Dissertations & Theses, 2017.
Dissertation: Ph. D. Union Institute and University 2017
Edition/Format:   Thesis/dissertation : Thesis/dissertation : English
Publication:Dissertation Abstracts International, 79-10A(E)
Summary:
Reflections of the Invisible: How Native American Descendants of the Former Northwest Territories (1787-1837) Develop and Maintain a Native American Identity A phenomenological study was designed to explore how federally non-recognized Native American self-identifiers, develop and maintain their Native American 1 identity through the lens of the Peoplehood model, as revised by Tom Holm et al. (2003). The Peoplehood
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Details

Material Type: Thesis/dissertation, Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Debora F Hurst; Union Institute & University.
ISBN: 9780438059603 0438059603
OCLC Number: 1047467525
Notes: Source: Dissertation Abstracts International, Volume: 79-10(E), Section: A.
Adviser: Jennifer Raymond.
Description: 186 pages

Abstract:

Reflections of the Invisible: How Native American Descendants of the Former Northwest Territories (1787-1837) Develop and Maintain a Native American Identity A phenomenological study was designed to explore how federally non-recognized Native American self-identifiers, develop and maintain their Native American 1 identity through the lens of the Peoplehood model, as revised by Tom Holm et al. (2003). The Peoplehood model consists of four Indigenous cultural concepts-- 1) sacred land, 2) sacred history, 3) cyclic ceremony and 4) language-- which are interrelated and interdependent. These self-identifiers are descendants of tribes of the former Northwest Territories (1787-1837), including the Ohio Miami Valley, who claim Native heritage. They may or may not assert affiliation with a specific tribal nation of the former geographical area of the Northwest Territory, but have not claimed rights and benefits under the federal recognition process2. Self-identifiers are impacted by non-recognition on many levels, such as, economically and socially experienced, as a loss of cultural identity, emotional and cultural isolation, and feelings of emptiness, which can be cultural problematic.

There were very few scholarly articles on federally non-recognized self-identifying Native people as the main focus in peer-reviewed social science journal articles. This study adds to the scholarly discourse by-- 1) making more visible federally non-recognized Native self-identifiers who live in the former Northwest Territories-- 2) offering an understanding of how self-identifiers develop and view Native identity despite social and political challenges-- 3) the meanings behind their resiliency in maintaining this identity and their need of belongingness and recognition or verification.

The main findings revealed that in developing a Native identity, the maternal family members by providing oral family history were the main influencers. Also, just as important was the self-identifiers attending powwows, acceptance of this heritage, learning the culture, and giving to their community (both residential and tribal) were significant factors. The maintenance of identity is enforced through family ties and participation in Native customs, practices, and traditions.

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