Remembering and forgetting Nazism : education, national identity, and the victim myth in postwar Austria (Book, 2003) [WorldCat.org]
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Remembering and forgetting Nazism : education, national identity, and the victim myth in postwar Austria
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Remembering and forgetting Nazism : education, national identity, and the victim myth in postwar Austria

Author: Peter Utgaard
Publisher: New York : Berghahn Books, 2003.
Edition/Format:   Print book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
This volume examines the myth of Austrian victimization at the hands of both Nazi Germany and the Allies from the years just before World War II through the mid 1990s. The author explains that the several interconnected themes that make up the myth turned the Austrian experience from 1938 to 1955 into a redemption narrative marking the birth of a democratic, prosperous, neutral, and non-German Austria. This concept  Read more...
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Genre/Form: History
Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Peter Utgaard
ISBN: 1571811877 9781571811875
OCLC Number: 50155338
Description: xiii, 234 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
Contents: Introduction: the "Austria-as-victim" myth and postwar Austrian identity --
pt. 1: Reversing the Anschluss, 1945-1955. From Blumchenkaffee to Wiener Mélange : schools, identity, and the birth of the Austria-as-victim myth --
pt. 2: Major themes of the Austria-as-victim myth, 1955-1986. Remembering and forgetting the Anschluss --
Remembering and forgetting World War II, the Holocaust, and the resistance --
Remembering and forgetting the allied occupation, rebuilding, and the state treaty : the second rebirth of Austria and new symbols of national identity --
pt. 3: The end of the Austria-as-victim myth? official memory since 1986. Fragmentation of the victim myth since 1986 : from Kurt Waldheim to Jörg Haider.
Responsibility: by Peter Utgaard.
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Abstract:

This volume examines the myth of Austrian victimization at the hands of both Nazi Germany and the Allies from the years just before World War II through the mid 1990s. The author explains that the several interconnected themes that make up the myth turned the Austrian experience from 1938 to 1955 into a redemption narrative marking the birth of a democratic, prosperous, neutral, and non-German Austria. This concept became the unifying theme of Austrian official memory and a key component of national identity as a new Austria emerged from the ruins. In the 1980s, Austrian myth of victimization came under intense scrutiny in the wake of the Kurt Waldheim scandal that marked the beginning of its erosion. The fiftieth anniversary of the Anschluss in 1988 accelerated this process and resulted in a collective shift away from the victim myth. Important themes examined include the rebirth of Austria, the Anschluss, the war and the Holocaust, the Austrian resistance, and the Allied occupation. The fragmentation of Austrian official memory since the late 1980s coincided with the dismantling of the Conservative and Social Democratic coalition, which had defined Austrian politics in the postwar period. Through the eyes of the Austrian school system, this book examines how postwar Austria came to terms with the Second World War.

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